Palestine tradition – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Sun, 08 May 2022 21:32:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine tradition – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 The escalation of Ramadan in Jerusalem https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-escalation-of-ramadan-in-jerusalem/ Sun, 08 May 2022 08:05:07 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-escalation-of-ramadan-in-jerusalem/ (May 8, 2022 / Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs) There has been a history of violence during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in recent years, but it’s not like Islamic law calls for an escalation during this time. There has been an effort by those wishing to promote violence to use Ramadan as a […]]]>

There has been a history of violence during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in recent years, but it’s not like Islamic law calls for an escalation during this time. There has been an effort by those wishing to promote violence to use Ramadan as a battle cry, and there really is no basis in Islamic theology for doing so.

It is true that there were important Muslim victories at the time of Ramadan, when Islam was just beginning. Muslims are all familiar with the Battle of Badr, the first battle between Muslims and the people of Mecca, which took place on the 19th of Ramadan in the year 624 CE. It was a tremendous victory for the Prophet Muhammad, and that is why it is commemorated. But the date is a coincidence. It was not a religious plan.

Nine years later, in the year 632, the conquest of Mecca by Muhammad and his armies took place on the 20th of Ramadan. Ramadan is therefore associated with the victory of the Muslim armies. It should not have been surprising that some Egyptians called the 1973 war the Ramadan war. Some have called Ramadan a month of jihad, but it’s not as if in their religious tradition you must wage war in Ramadan.

Muslims accept security cameras in mosques in Abu Dhabi and Makkah

A few years ago the idea was put forward that we should have cameras on the Temple Mount to see exactly who is smuggling weapons into Al-Aqsa Mosque. The idea was to catch them in the act, and it seemed like a smart move. But the Muslim religious Waqf and the Jordanians who sponsor the Waqf have opposed this idea.

When I was Director General of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a delegation visited Abu Dhabi. The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is one of the most beautiful mosques in the Muslim world. When we went to the mosque, there was no problem for me to wear a kippa, because the UAE believes in universalism. Inside the mosque, I looked up at the ceiling and saw security cameras – the same cameras we wanted to install in Al-Aqsa Mosque, which everyone was making a fuss about. But in the Sheikh Zayed mosque, no one objected.

Later, I researched what is happening at the Grand Mosque in Mecca in Saudi Arabia, looking at photos and films, and saw that the cameras had been installed there. So the cameras were okay for the Grand Mosque in Makkah and for the Sheikh Zayed Mosque, but for some reason security officials on the Muslim side felt embarrassed to allow cameras in the Al-Aqsa Mosque. And that was only an invitation to disaster in the following years.

The Muslim Brotherhood is behind the incitement

Sheikh Raed Salah leads the northern branch of the Islamic Movement in Israel. The Islamic Movement in Israel is actually a branch of the Muslim Brotherhood. Salah was one of the great incentive writers we dealt with. Israel imprisoned him for incitement several times. It causes a lot of problems.

When I was in the Israeli government, between 1996 and 1998, I had to deal with the aftermath of Salah’s incitement. For example, one of his ideas was to go up to the Temple Mount and clean the water cisterns there, then bring water to the Temple Mount from the Zamzam spring in Mecca. It wasn’t just our security forces who raised their eyebrows when they heard about the Zamzam plan. The Arabs themselves were concerned.

Salah lives in the Galilee, where he sponsors mass gatherings with huge signs in Arabic saying “Al-Aqsa is in danger”. It was really fanning the flames of Muslim concern that the Jews were going to take control of Al-Aqsa and drive them out, even though no one was planning for it. No one had mentioned it. But it was a very dangerous conspiracy theory to promote. And it took a lot of work on Israel’s part to allay those concerns.

It’s calmed down a bit, but it’s something we have to watch very closely. Freedom of religion and freedom of expression are fundamental to Israeli democracy, and we must protect them. But we also work in a context where religious incitement is rampant in the Middle East. You have to achieve some sort of balance so that you can keep Jerusalem open and free and not have a city where there are religious concerns jihad and things like that, and maintaining that careful balance is something that Israel specializes in.

Prayer on the Temple Mount

In 1967, Moshe Dayan, Israel’s Minister of Defense during the Six Day War, established the rule that Jews could visit the Temple Mount but could not pray there. Today, by popular demand, Jews pray on the Temple Mount, albeit privately and not in obviously organized public prayers. The rules have changed, and I think that’s a good thing.

When we visit religious sites around the world, for example in Rome, if you go to St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, you will see people of different faiths there, and St. Peter’s is open to all religions. It is extremely important that Israel, as custodian of the holy sites in Jerusalem, ensures that all religious sites are free and open. That’s what others in our international coalition of democracies are doing, and that’s what we should be doing.

I don’t think we should impose ourselves on Muslims. On the contrary, we must respect their religious sensitivities. But at the same time, a place like the Temple Mount should be open to all faiths. And frankly, I firmly believe that only Israel can protect religious freedom for all major religions. We have done it in the past and we will do it in the future. But it will take a lot of expert diplomacy to make it work.

The role of the media

The media have a huge responsibility in these matters. They shouldn’t become conduits for a whole mythology that someone is planning to destroy someone else’s religion. We must also be aware of the sensitivity of certain periods and ensure that Muslims feel reassured about the protection of their interests. Don’t send pen pals to sensitive areas of the Muslim world at sensitive times and have them run like a bull through a Chinese store, creating a lot of historic animosity.

I believe we can coexist. I have had meetings with Muslim colleagues from the Arab world and we understand each other. This is what must happen. I believe it can happen and that is what we should promote.

The evolving role of Saudi Arabia

In the early 1990s, I wrote a provocatively titled book about Saudi Arabia, “The Kingdom of Hatred,” and I have continued to monitor what has been happening in Saudi Arabia ever since. Many of the early engagements of the jihadist world to religious war arose in the years 1998 until 2005. Then, after 9/11, an overhaul occurred in Saudi Arabia. I’ve noticed some really big policy changes that haven’t gotten the coverage they should have gotten in the media.

When I wrote my book on Saudi Arabia in 2003, the Saudis were funding 50-70% of Hamas’ budget through huge international charities. Then, after the second intifada, the second uprising among the Palestinians, we had a lot of evidence of how the money was circulating and why. But the Saudis suddenly stopped supporting Hamas. The money then came from Iran, not Saudi Arabia. This deserves to be noted and recognized, as it is a fundamental shift in policy that could make possible an understanding and even an eventual peace agreement between Israel and Saudi Arabia. All is not pessimistic.

The Growing Iranian Nuclear Threat

Geopolitically, we have a growing danger in the East with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Iran is developing a nuclear weapons program and says Israel should be wiped off the map. We have to be very aware of what they are doing and be careful to neutralize a program like that.

I think it is possible that the states of the Middle East, especially the Gulf states and Israel, can find common ground to work together, especially to stop the Iranian threat. Iran does not have to be Israel’s inevitable enemy. Iran and Israel got along before and could get along again.

But there must be a fundamental change in behavior because, alongside the nuclear weapons program, Iran has been active in promoting the spread of revolutionary organizations across the Middle East, from Morocco in the west to Iraq to the east. These organizations threaten the stability of a wide variety of regimes, and they are a threat to Israel. We need to work with our Arab neighbors, especially in the Gulf, and see if we can create a more stable region. The basis for doing so is there. What would make a big difference is for the United States and European powers to work with us to support such an effort if we undertake it ourselves.

Dore Gold is Israel’s former ambassador to the United Nations and current chair of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs.

This article was first published by the Jerusalem Public Affairs Center.

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The escalation of Ramadan in Jerusalem | The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com | Amb. Golden Gold | 4 Iyyar 5782 – 5 May 2022 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-escalation-of-ramadan-in-jerusalem-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-amb-golden-gold-4-iyyar-5782-5-may-2022/ Thu, 05 May 2022 08:11:20 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-escalation-of-ramadan-in-jerusalem-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-amb-golden-gold-4-iyyar-5782-5-may-2022/ Photo credit: Jamal Awad / Flash 90 Palestinian Authority Arabs pray during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan at the Al-Aqsa Mosque within the Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem’s Old City, April 15, 2022. Using Ramadan as a battle cry to promote escalation There has been a history of violence during the Muslim holy month […]]]>

Photo credit: Jamal Awad / Flash 90

Palestinian Authority Arabs pray during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan at the Al-Aqsa Mosque within the Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem’s Old City, April 15, 2022.

Using Ramadan as a battle cry to promote escalation

There has been a history of violence during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in recent years, but it’s not like Islamic law calls for an escalation of escalation during this time. There has been an effort by those who wish to promote violence to use Ramadan as a battle cry to mobilize forces, to mobilize people. And there really is no basis in Islamic theology for doing that.

It is true that there were important Muslim victories at the time of Ramadan, when Islam was just beginning. Muslims all know about the Battle of Badr. It was the first battle between the Muslims and the people of Mecca on the 19th of Ramadan in the year 624. It was a tremendous victory for the Prophet Muhammad, and that is why it is commemorated. But the date is a coincidence. It was not a religious plan.

Nine years later, in the year 632, the conquest of Mecca by Muhammad and his armies took place on the 20th of Ramadan. Thus, Ramadan is associated with the moment of the victory of the Muslim armies. It should not have been surprising that some Egyptians called the 1973 war the Ramadan war. Some have called Ramadan a month of jihadbut it’s not as if, in their religious tradition, you have to wage war on Ramadan.

Muslims accept security cameras in mosques in Abu Dhabi and Makkah

A few years ago the idea was put forward that we should have cameras on the Temple Mount to see exactly who is smuggling weapons into Al-Aqsa Mosque. The idea was to catch them in the act, and it seemed like a smart move. But the Muslim religious Wakf and the Jordanians who sponsor the Wakf have opposed the idea.

When I was Director General of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a delegation visited Abu Dhabi. The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is one of the most beautiful mosques in the Muslim world. When we went to the mosque, there was no problem with me wearing a yarmulke because the UAE believes in universalism. Inside the mosque, I looked up at the ceiling and saw security cameras – the same cameras that we wanted to install in Al-Aqsa Mosque and that everyone was making a fuss about. But in the Sheikh Zayed mosque, no one objected.

Later, I researched what is happening at the Grand Mosque in Mecca in Saudi Arabia, looking at photos and films, and I saw the cameras that had been installed in the Grand Mosque. Thus, the cameras were correct for the Grand Mosque of Mecca and for the Sheikh Zayed Mosque. But for some reason, security officials on the Muslim side felt reluctant to allow cameras into Al-Aqsa Mosque. And that was only an invitation to disaster in the following years.

The Muslim Brotherhood is behind the incitement

Sheikh Raed Salah leads the northern branch of the Islamic Movement in Israel. The Islamic Movement in Israel is actually a branch of the Muslim Brotherhood. Salah was one of the great incentive writers we dealt with. Israel imprisoned him for incitement at different times. It causes a lot of problems.

When I was in the Israeli government for the first time between 1996 and 1998, I had to deal with the aftermath of Sheikh Raed Salah. For example, one of his ideas was to go up to the Temple Mount and clean the cisterns meant to hold water, and to bring water to the Temple Mount from the holy well of the Zamzam Spring. in Mecca. It wasn’t just our security forces who raised their eyebrows when they heard about the Zamzam plan. The Arabs themselves were concerned.

Sheikh Raed Salah lives in the Galilee where he sponsors mass gatherings with huge signs in Arabic saying “Al-Aqsa is in danger”. It was really fanning the flames of Muslim concern that the Jews were going to take control of Al-Aqsa and drive them out, even though no one was planning for that. No one had mentioned it. But it was a very dangerous conspiracy theory to promote. And it took a lot of work on Israel’s part to allay those concerns.

It’s calmed down a bit, but it’s something we have to watch very closely. Freedom of religion and freedom of expression are fundamental to Israeli democracy and we must protect them. But we also work in a context where religious incitement is rampant in the Middle East. You have to achieve some sort of balance so that you can keep Jerusalem open and free and not have a city where there are religious concerns jihad and things like that, and maintaining that careful balance is something that Israel specializes in.

Prayer on the Temple Mount

In 1967, Moshe Dayan, Israel’s Minister of Defense during the Six Day War, established the rule that Jews could visit the Temple Mount but they could not pray there. Today, by popular demand, Jews now go to the Temple Mount where they pray in private, not in obviously organized public prayers. The rules have changed and I think that’s a good thing.

When we visit religious sites around the world, for example in Rome, if you go to St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, you will see people of different faiths there and St. Peter is open to all religions. It is extremely important that Israel, as custodian of the holy sites in Jerusalem, follows precedents in the world where there are free and open religious sites. That’s what others in our international coalition of democracies are doing, and that’s what we should be doing.

I don’t think we should impose ourselves on Muslims. On the contrary, we must respect their religious sensitivities. But at the same time, a place like the Temple Mount should be open to all faiths. And frankly, I firmly believe that only Israel can protect religious freedom for all major religions. We have done it in the past and we will do it in the future. But it will take a lot of expert diplomacy to make it work.

The role of the media

The media have a huge responsibility in these matters. They shouldn’t become conduits for a whole mythology that someone is planning to destroy someone else’s religion. We must also be aware of the sensitivity of certain periods of time and ensure that Muslims feel reassured about the protection of their interests. Don’t send pen pals to sensitive areas of the Muslim world at sensitive times and have them run like a bull through a Chinese store and create a lot of historical animosity.

I believe we can coexist. I have had meetings with Muslim colleagues from the Arab world and we understand each other. This is what must happen. I believe it can happen and that is what we should promote.

The evolving role of Saudi Arabia

In the early 1990s, I wrote a very provocatively titled book about Saudi Arabia called kingdom of hatreds, and I have continued to monitor what has been happening in Saudi Arabia ever since. Many of the early engagements of the jihadist world to religious war arose in the years 1998 until 2005. Then after 9/11 in Saudi Arabia there was an overhaul that happened. I have noticed very significant policy changes that have not received the proper coverage they should have received in the media.

When I wrote my book on Saudi Arabia in 2003, the Saudis were funding 50-70% of Hamas’ budget through these huge international charities. Then after the second intifada, the second uprising among the Palestinians, we had a lot of evidence of how the money was flowing and why it was happening. But the Saudis suddenly stopped supporting Hamas and they stopped giving it large sums of money. The money then came from Iran, not Saudi Arabia. It is worth noting and giving them credit for it, as it is a fundamental shift in policy that could make possible an understanding and even an eventual peace agreement between Israel and Saudi Arabia. All is not pessimistic.

The Growing Iranian Nuclear Threat

Geopolitically, we have a growing danger in the East with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Iran is developing a nuclear weapons program and says Israel should be wiped off the map. We have to be very aware of what they are doing and be careful to neutralize a program like that.

I think it is possible that the states of the Middle East, especially the Gulf states and Israel, can find common ground to work together, especially to stop the Iranian threat. Iran does not have to be Israel’s inevitable enemy. Iran and Israel got along before and could get along again.

But there must be a fundamental change in behavior because, alongside the nuclear weapons program, Iran has been active in promoting the spread of revolutionary organizations across the Middle East, from Morocco in the west to Iraq to the east. These organizations threaten the stability of a wide variety of regimes, and they are a threat to Israel. We need to work with our Arab neighbors, especially in the Gulf, and see if we can create a more stable region. The basis for doing so is there. What would make a big difference is for the United States and European powers to work with us to support such an effort if we undertake it ourselves.

{Reposted from JCPA site}

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The Absolute Best Mediterranean Restaurants in the United States https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-absolute-best-mediterranean-restaurants-in-the-united-states/ Sun, 01 May 2022 06:04:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-absolute-best-mediterranean-restaurants-in-the-united-states/ Chef Enrique Limardo is the originator of Imperfecto’s fusion concept. The menu changes daily with an ongoing commitment to exploring the interplay between Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines. The white and blue hues are reminiscent of Greece and may recall notions tied to Artistolean perfectionism, a concept that Limardo rejects, opting instead for a world […]]]>

Chef Enrique Limardo is the originator of Imperfecto’s fusion concept. The menu changes daily with an ongoing commitment to exploring the interplay between Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines. The white and blue hues are reminiscent of Greece and may recall notions tied to Artistolean perfectionism, a concept that Limardo rejects, opting instead for a world that only evolves by being “imperfect”.

Light and airy, the dining room uses height and bold curves to create architectural intrigue, mimicking the feel of a whitewashed Greek town. As for the cocktail menu, the Perfectly Imperfect cocktail combines Belvedere vodka, Limoncello, yuzu juice, fresh pineapple and vanilla syrup in a coupe glass. La Noche Caliente combines jalapeño reposado tequila, Alessio vermouth, biscotti liqueur and mirto rosso.

According to Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema, Moussaka cigars with smoked eggplant and goat cheese-manchego cream are incredible. Sietsema also praises foie gras with crisp plantain brioche, soursop compote, parmesan and truffle.

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Berlin’s Gropius Bau hosts Beirut and the Golden Sixties exhibition https://therightroadtopeace.com/berlins-gropius-bau-hosts-beirut-and-the-golden-sixties-exhibition/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 05:15:06 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/berlins-gropius-bau-hosts-beirut-and-the-golden-sixties-exhibition/ A work by Aref El Rayess at the exhibition. Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer Beirut and the Golden Sixties: A Manifesto of Fragility, is an exhibition at Gropius Bau, Berlin (March 25 – June 12). It revisits an exhilarating chapter of global modernism in Beirut, from the Lebanese crisis of 1958 to 1975, the year that […]]]>

A work by Aref El Rayess at the exhibition.

Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer

Beirut and the Golden Sixties: A Manifesto of Fragility, is an exhibition at Gropius Bau, Berlin (March 25 – June 12). It revisits an exhilarating chapter of global modernism in Beirut, from the Lebanese crisis of 1958 to 1975, the year that saw the outbreak of the Lebanese civil war. The exhibition presents a heterogeneous mix of artists whose desire for formal innovation is matched only by the tenacity of their political convictions.

It traces the antagonism between the politicized cosmopolitanism of Beirut and the transregional conflicts that surround it. With 230 works by 34 artists and more than 300 archival documents from nearly 40 collections, it is the most complete presentation to date of a pivotal period in the history of Beirut, a city that continues to carry the weight of his irreconcilable ambitions.

“Our programming at Gropius Bau looks at history from a contemporary perspective while emphasizing the interconnectedness of art with current and past sociopolitical conflicts,” says Stephanie Rosenthal, Director of Gropius Bau.

Martin-Gropius-Bau, commonly known as Gropius Bau, is a major exhibition building in Berlin, Germany. Originally a museum of applied arts, it has been listed as a historical monument since 1966.

Art Birlin 2 A composition by Nicolas Moufarrege at the exhibition.

Beirut and the Golden Sixties mark a brief but rich period of artistic and political effervescence. A continuous influx of intellectuals and cultural practitioners from the Arabic-speaking Middle East and North Africa has flocked to Beirut during three turbulent decades marked by revolutions, coups and wars in all regions.

Encouraged in part by Lebanon’s Banking Secrecy Law of 1956, a flow of foreign capital has also flowed into the city. New commercial galleries, independent art spaces and museums flourished. Beirut was packed, not only with people, but also with ideas.

Yet beneath the surface of a glistening golden age of prosperity, antagonisms festered, before finally exploding into a 15-year civil war.

“Beirut and the Golden Sixties demonstrate our commitment to challenging the metanarratives of modernism by illuminating centers of artistic production often relegated to the fringes of art history,” say Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, Associate Curators, Gropius Bau. Presented in five thematic sections, the exhibition presents the range of artistic practices and political projects that flourished in Beirut from the 1950s to the 1970s.

The Port of Beirut: The Place: In 1958, Beirut was a hub of intellectual and artistic life in the Middle East. With its long tradition of freedom of expression, it has attracted artists and intellectuals fleeing autocratic regimes elsewhere in the region. The Place explores the tense notion of belonging between artists from different communities in the region. The title of the section is taken from the title of a 1974 Etel Adnan leporello.

Art Birlin 3 The exhibition unveils a chapter of global modernism in Beirut.

Lovers: The Body: The second section of the exhibition, The Body, explores Beirut’s role as a site of experimentation and testing ground against the confines of a heteronormative bourgeois society. The title of this section is taken from the title of a Mona Saudi painting from 1963.

Takween (Composition): The Form: A mix of artists using and negotiating a wide range of techniques, materials and styles converging on Beirut’s rich art scene. The cultural programming was diverse and involved global players such as Max Ernst, André Masson, Wifredo Lam and Zao Wou-Ki. The Form considers local debates around the articulation of various modernist tendencies in Beirut, paying particular attention to the predominance of abstraction in the 1950s to 1970s. It traces the link between artists’ political affinities and their adherence to a style or school, ranging from oriental abstraction to informal art.

The title of this section is taken from the title of a painting by Hashim Samarchi from 1972.

Monster and Child: The Politics: The fourth section, The Politics, takes a close look at the relationship between art and politics in the years leading up to the Lebanese Civil War before bigotry took over all aspects of life in the city. During this height of cultural production, artists searched for forms suited to their various engagements – from the utopian projects of pan-Arabism and postcolonial struggle to the divisive political alignments of the Cold War, the Vietnam War and the Palestinian cause.

The title of this section is taken from the title of a painting by Fateh al-Mudarres from 1970.

Blood of the Phoenix: The War: The final section of the exhibition examines the lasting impact of the Lebanese Civil War on cultural production in Beirut. With the closure of galleries and independent art spaces and the migration of artists to Europe, the United States and the Gulf (prefiguring migration from contemporary Lebanon in crisis), the war took its toll. The ensuing devastation exposed the irreconcilability of Beirut’s complex politics, laying bare the myth of a ‘golden age’.

The title of this section is taken from the title of a tapestry by Nicolas Moufarrege from 1975. Beirut and the Golden Sixties: A Manifesto of Fragility was drawn up concurrently with the October uprisings, the devastating explosion of August 2020, to Lebanon’s unprecedented economic crisis and the global COVID-19 pandemic. A comprehensive multimedia installation is created specifically for the exhibition by artists and filmmakers Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, who live and work between Paris and Beirut. He contemplates the transformation of works of art by acts of violence in an immersive installation of screens and performances.

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AAUP errs in taking sides on definition of anti-Semitism (opinion) https://therightroadtopeace.com/aaup-errs-in-taking-sides-on-definition-of-anti-semitism-opinion/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 07:09:59 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/aaup-errs-in-taking-sides-on-definition-of-anti-semitism-opinion/ The American Association of University Teachers for a hundred years has protected its political neutrality by not taking a position on controversial issues unrelated to academic freedom. Academics on both sides of current policy debates might thus see the organization as a defender of the core principles that underpin the academy, not as an advocate […]]]>

The American Association of University Teachers for a hundred years has protected its political neutrality by not taking a position on controversial issues unrelated to academic freedom. Academics on both sides of current policy debates might thus see the organization as a defender of the core principles that underpin the academy, not as an advocate of a position that would otherwise divide its members. But the organization has recently compromised the tradition that has served it well for so many decades. Worse still, the very AAUP committee that has kept and upheld this tradition—Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure—has now taken sides on a hotly debated topic it should have scrupulously avoided: the definition of academic freedom. anti-Semitism.

For more than a decade, the AAUP has had both national staff and faculty appointees with strong views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but staff and faculty leaders have largely eschewed actions or statements. who aligned the organization with their personal political views. No more. Under the pretext of opposing intrusive legislation, Committee A unnecessarily decided to reject the definition of anti-Semitism widely adopted by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), particularly with regard to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a completely superfluous position in relation to the real problem of legislation. interference. As a result, the national AAUP has now officially endorsed the political assault on the IHRA definition.

Committee A’s March 2022 statement titled “Legislative Threats to Academic Freedom: Redefinitions of Antisemitism and Racism” casts its critique as an objection to legislative efforts to restrict teachings on antisemitism and critical theory of racism. race in universities, citing Florida legislation as a key example. The plan to protect the university curriculum from legislative intrusion is both laudable and very much in keeping with AAUP tradition. We agree with Committee A that state legislatures should refrain from interfering in school curricula at all levels and that the definition of IHRA should not be enshrined in law. But Committee A’s decision to link the very different topics of anti-Semitism and critical race theory is misguided and appears to serve an ideological purpose the committee should not have advanced.

The committee erroneously claims that the IHRA definition “equates criticism of the policies of the State of Israel with anti-Semitism.” In fact, the IHRA definition makes it unambiguous that criticism of Israeli policies comparable to those exercised against other democratic nations is do not anti-semitic. The IHRA only states that the Jewish state must be eliminated can labeled as anti-Semitic, depending on the exact circumstances. Eliminationist claims, of course, are about Israel’s right to exist, raising questions of self-determination, not its government policies.

Committee A adds that the IHRA “prioritizes the political interests of the State of Israel and suppresses discussion and activism in the name of Palestinian rights.” It’s wrong. There are almost endless human rights violations around the world that are available for comparison and potential application to Israel and other countries in the Middle East under the principle of the IHRA. In any case, the IHRA definition itself was never intended to be a law, but only a teaching aid. The debate over Palestinian rights is not inhibited by the IHRA’s examples of the many forms that contemporary anti-Semitism can take.

Committee A further asserts, without links or citations, that the IHRA definition has led to “cancellation of academic courses and conferences” and “targeting of faculty members in Middle Eastern studies.” “. If true, that would be a basis for opposing the militarization of the definition (as we do), but not a valid critique of the definition itself. Any statement of principles can be misused by extremists.

The 2019 Florida law on which the AAUP statement focuses includes elements of the IHRA definition, which we agree is an improper exercise of government enforcement power. But the AAUP goes beyond criticism of the legislation, attacking the IHRA’s definition itself as “overly broad” and discriminatory. The slippage is more than misguided. It’s also misleading. definition of the IHRA has been adopted by more than 800 entities worldwide, including a number of governments and universities. AAUP does not explicitly oppose the adoption of the IHRA by universities, but in erroneously implying that the definition itself restricts academic freedom, the AAUP has made its opposition clear.

The politicization of the AAUP is underscored by its endorsement of the “Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism,” a recent document opposing the IHRA which, as one of us has argued elsewhere, validates the anti-Zionism. The AAUP’s stated preference for the Jerusalem Declaration is gratuitous at best. Opposition to legislative constraints on academic speech in no way necessitates or warrants endorsement of the Jerusalem Declaration or any other contested definition of anti-Semitism. Florida’s statute would likely be just as reprehensible had it enshrined the committee’s favorite Jerusalem Declaration, rather than the IHRA. The committee admits that “the growth of anti-Semitism is a serious threat” – in a single half-sentence – but concludes, without explanation or reasoning, that it should not be considered “a particular form of discrimination” . Whether due to ignorance or indifference, the committee believes that anti-Semitism “can and should be treated under existing civil rights laws as religious or racial discrimination,” an observation that goes well beyond its expertise and has no bearing on academic freedom.

The committee’s statement makes no reference to legal prohibitions on discrimination based on national origin, a choice that precludes consideration of discrimination against Israelis. But it also means eliminating discrimination against Jews as a people. If the Jews are not a people, their aspirations for a state of their own are largely discredited. More broadly, recognizing that anti-Semitism is a conspiracy theory that purports to explain the world – the course of modern history, the hidden manifestations of Jewish power, the relations between nations, the struggle between good and evil – is impossible if the discussion is limited to questions of race and religion. Even to understand Nazi anti-Semitism with its emphasis on race, one must understand the extent of the other theories that the Third Reich weaponized against the Jews.

Even setting aside the unique history of anti-Semitism in Western culture, it should be obvious to a knowledgeable researcher that most forms of anti-Jewish discrimination in the United States do not fit neatly into categories of religion or of race found in most legislation. Indeed, a federal court ruled in 2019 that a non-practicing Jew — a category that includes more than one million Americans — was not covered by Title VII’s prohibition against discrimination based on “sex.” , race, color, national origin and religion”. The court then ruled that Jews are protected by Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866, but only because Jews were considered racially distinct at that time, a categorization that was later adopted by the Nazis. then repudiated in the United States.

There is another problem with the committee’s objection to laws treating anti-Semitism as “a special form of discrimination.” Until the United States Supreme Court’s Bostock decision in 2020, it was unclear whether gay and transgender people were covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination. based on sex” but does not specifically address sexual orientation or gender. identify. In the meantime, many states and municipalities have admirably enacted laws and ordinances specifically protecting gay men and other LGBT+ people from discrimination in housing and employment. According to the committee’s reasoning, states should have refrained from addressing these “special forms[s] discrimination” until the courts catch up with our contemporary conception of equality. In fact, anti-LGBT+ activists regularly made arguments nearly identical to the committee’s view on anti-Semitism, opposing what they saw as “special rights” for LGBT+ people.

The risk in the AAUP polemic against the IHRA, however, is not only to disable historical understanding, but also to block understanding of the contemporary world. This understanding should take into account a broader account of the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement than the generous and sympathetic one that the AAUP offers in labeling it a “peaceful form of economic and cultural protest.” It could be pointed out that BDS advocates support academic boycotts, which the AAUP still officially opposes.

The IHRA definition has its shortcomings, as do all statements on complex issues. Readers may disagree with her on the merits, while acknowledging that the AAUP has overstepped its role in weighing in on the issue. The stated mission of Committee A is to protect academic freedom and tenure. Opposition to restrictive legislation, whatever its form or substance, falls squarely within this mandate. Stating a position on the definition of anti-Semitism, however, is well beyond its mandate.

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Russian cyberattack could capitalize on electoral doubts | app https://therightroadtopeace.com/russian-cyberattack-could-capitalize-on-electoral-doubts-app/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 12:03:25 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/russian-cyberattack-could-capitalize-on-electoral-doubts-app/ As the war in Ukraine continues, the United States is warning that Russia and aligned criminal groups could launch cyberattacks against critical US infrastructure, potentially including electoral systems ahead of the November election. Election officials and cybersecurity experts fear that disruption by Russia or other foreign actors could take advantage of plummeting confidence in election […]]]>

As the war in Ukraine continues, the United States is warning that Russia and aligned criminal groups could launch cyberattacks against critical US infrastructure, potentially including electoral systems ahead of the November election.

Election officials and cybersecurity experts fear that disruption by Russia or other foreign actors could take advantage of plummeting confidence in election integrity among American voters, fueled by the myths and misinformation that have saturated the country.

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The Finnish Kiasma museum reopens with a space dedicated to Middle Eastern art https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-finnish-kiasma-museum-reopens-with-a-space-dedicated-to-middle-eastern-art/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 10:56:21 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-finnish-kiasma-museum-reopens-with-a-space-dedicated-to-middle-eastern-art/ HELSINKI: Two years after being forced to close due to pandemic restrictions, Helsinki’s Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art has reopened in Finland’s capital with a newly renovated interior and a sprawling exhibition that takes up all five floors of the building. “ARS22 — Living Encounters” brings together contemporary visual arts, performances and films from local […]]]>

HELSINKI: Two years after being forced to close due to pandemic restrictions, Helsinki’s Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art has reopened in Finland’s capital with a newly renovated interior and a sprawling exhibition that takes up all five floors of the building.

“ARS22 — Living Encounters” brings together contemporary visual arts, performances and films from local and international artists in a large-scale exhibition that will run until October 16, 2022.

ARS, a series of major international exhibitions of contemporary art, was first conceived in 1961 and held at the Ateneum museum in Helsinki. ARS22 is the 14th exhibition in the series and the 10th to be held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma. In total, the exhibitions welcomed more than one million visitors and featured works by around 600 artists or groups.

Since its opening 61 years ago, the gallery has addressed major issues around the world, and this year’s edition continues the tradition.

In addition to the 15 commissions produced exclusively for the exhibition, works by 55 artists from 26 countries, including Iraq, the United Arab Emirates, Australia and Mexico, explore the exhibition’s themes of coexistence, our relationship with the world and the challenges facing the planet and humanity. .

Michael Rakowitz, “The Ballad of Special Ops Cody” (2017). Provided

“The idea behind ARS22 was to build an entity where multiple voices would coexist together. To create a museum as a platform for encounters, we curated an exhibition where many stories, instead of a linear storyline, would exist,” said said Piia Oksanen, who curated the exhibit alongside museum director Leevi Haapala, chief exhibit curator Joao Laia, and a team including her twin sister Satu Oksanen, Saara Hacklin, Kati Kivinen, Patrik Nyberg, Jonna Strandberg and Jari -Pekka Vanhala.

“That’s why invitations were sent out to artists from different backgrounds, from different geographies, working with a variety of media,” she said.

According to Oksanen, “there is a growing interest in artists from the Arab world”.

Several artists from the Middle East have been invited to participate in ARS22, including Kholod Hawash, a self-taught textile artist from Iraq; Farah Al-Qasimi, an Emirati visual artist; Michael Rakowitz, an Iraqi-American multidisciplinary artist; and Slavs and Tatars, a collective of anonymous artists founded in 2006 by a Polish-Iranian duo.

Al-Qasimi told Arab News that “it’s always great to be able to show your work in new environments. The show-investigations are fascinating for the dialogues they offer between artists who work in different ways.

The Abu Dhabi-born artist is known for her color-saturated photographs, many of which are displayed on the second floor of the museum.


Farah Al-Qasimi, ‘Khaleeji Dance’ (2020). Provided

Al-Qasimi’s artwork, which features images of a woman watching an anime on her iPhone, butterflies sitting on a slice of orange and an injured falcon being treated in a hospital, was brought to the exhibition by chief curator Laia, who invited the artist for a studio visit while she was in quarantine last November.

“You have to attend the works one by one,” Al-Qasimi said.

NADA Artadia Prize winner is known for her seductive portraits illustrating materialism and gender relations in the United Arab Emirates.

“The work in the exhibition is part of my research into ideas of paradise in contemporary culture; specifically, in religion and in the leisure and entertainment industries,” she said.

“There are references to the little ways people try to embody their own versions of idealism in everyday life, through shopping, nature or worship. It’s joyful, but also a little critical at times.

The second floor of the museum also exhibits works of the Slavic and Tatar art collective.

This year’s edition of the exhibition is the first to include works from previous exhibitions.

“We are delighted that our work will be included in the first iteration to include works from decades past, given that Slaves and Tatars was designed, in part, to counter the amnesiac focus on the new, the present, the current “, the artists mentioned.

The group installed a carpeted seating area that is a cross between a rahle, a reading desk for religious texts, and the takht, a space to sit and converse in traditional teahouses. Titled ‘PrayWay’, the installation also references flying carpets from Middle Eastern fairy tales such as ‘Aladdin’ and an example of the group’s interactive work – a space to sit, chat and connect with others .


Slavs and Tatars, “Mother tongues and paternal throats” (2012). Provided

Next to the silk and wool rug is a five-meter-high hanging rug titled “Mother Tongues, Father Throats” which depicts a diagram of the mouth showing which parts are responsible for pronouncing the letters of the Arabic alphabet. In the middle (the throat), the artists have added the Hebrew and Cyrillic equivalents of the Arabic “kha” and “qaf”, which are not present in the Western language, and mark a clear boundary between East and West.

“We are interested in redeeming the other organs of language, be it the throat or the nose, often overshadowed by the tongue,” the art collective said. “Alphabets are eminently political vehicles. We tend to imagine them innocent, but Latin, Cyrillic and Arabic each accompanied the imperial projects.

Meanwhile, two floors above hang colorful patchwork quilts by Hawash, born in Basra, now based in Helsinki and known for her hand-sewn textile pieces using a traditional Iraqi technique.

The artist taught herself to sew after watching her mother make patchwork quilts by hand-sewing scraps of discarded fabric.

According to Hawash, sanctions against Iraq at the time meant that textiles and fabrics were in short supply, so Iraqis had to use old clothes and materials taken from home to sew their “jodaleia”, the Arabic term designating traditional handmade Iraqi quilts.

Three of his outstanding works occupy the fourth floor of the museum.


Kholod Hawash, ‘Wild Song’ (2021). Provided

Hawash and her husband, Saddam Jumaily, an Iraqi painter and sculptor, sought refuge in Amman from persecution before settling in Finland with the help of Artists at Risk. Exiled artists were the first residents of AR-ICORN Safe Haven Helsinki.

“I’ve been threatened multiple times for not wearing a hijab,” Hawash said, standing next to a quilt depicting a woman cutting her hair.

“In our culture, many women cut their hair as a form of resistance and a way to distance themselves from the ‘weaker sex’,” she said.

In addition to being beautiful, Hawash’s textiles deal with political decadence, social and economic justice, refugee and migration issues, religious freedom, and other humanitarian issues.

She also draws inspiration from Iraqi folklore, with figures of goats, fish, birds and horses featuring in her embroidered work.

“It’s relevant to look outside the western world and recognize how intertwined histories and current concerns are,” Oksanen said of the decision to include artists and works from the Middle East in the series. exposure.

Indeed, there is an endless supply of sophisticated and thought-provoking works from the Arab world and it is time dedicated spaces were made available to them.

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Double Time: Mt. Vernon Jarrards win 2021-22 Men’s Basketball Athlete of the Year honors – Reuters Sports News https://therightroadtopeace.com/double-time-mt-vernon-jarrards-win-2021-22-mens-basketball-athlete-of-the-year-honors-reuters-sports-news/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 03:32:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/double-time-mt-vernon-jarrards-win-2021-22-mens-basketball-athlete-of-the-year-honors-reuters-sports-news/ Mt. Vernon’s Amhad Jarrard, left, and Armon Jarrard were named the 2021-22 Daily Reporter All-Hancock County Boys’ Basketball Players of the Year. Tom Russo | Daily reporter FORTVILLE – Armon Jarrard knows better. At the same time, he’s also not one to back down. It’s been several years since Mt. Vernon’s senior twins, Amhad and […]]]>

Mt. Vernon’s Amhad Jarrard, left, and Armon Jarrard were named the 2021-22 Daily Reporter All-Hancock County Boys’ Basketball Players of the Year.

Tom Russo | Daily reporter

FORTVILLE – Armon Jarrard knows better. At the same time, he’s also not one to back down.

It’s been several years since Mt. Vernon’s senior twins, Amhad and Armon Jarrard, faced off on the basketball court. Their father, Antwain, put an end to this ancient tradition some time ago, and for good reason.

Neither Jarrard ever wants to lose.

“We don’t play anymore because we always end up arguing,” Amhad said. “We haven’t played for a long time.”

On the court, Amhad, who is 15 minutes older, has never failed to get under his brother’s skin with a quick hoop practice, fingertip steal or vice versa with Armon burying a jumper with Amhad’s hand in his face or attacking the rim, himself.

“He hasn’t dunked me yet,” Armon pointed out.

“He knows,” joked Amhad. “It won’t fit under the ledge.”

Armon has seen his brother punish iron many times, whether in an AAU game, in-season at Mt. Vernon, or in a random pickup game.

Amhad knows that Armon is not one to challenge from any distance, let alone in the lane.

Quiet by nature, the Jarrards talk loudly when playing basketball, and their abilities have not gone unnoticed this offseason.

Every day, a new honor or a new invitation to a presentation seems to arrive.

First, IBCA All-State selections with Armon earning a spot on the prestigious Senior Supreme 15 team, while Amhad was named to the Senior Large School All-State team.

Both were also invited to compete in the IHSAA/IBCA Workout Top 100, Hoosier Reunion Classic at Historic Hoosier Gym in Knightstown later this month and earned automatic placements on the All-Hoosier Heritage Conference team for a second. consecutive year.

Recently, Armon was named Class 4A Associated Press Third-Team All-State. A week earlier, Amhad was recognized by becoming the fourth Mt. Vernon male player in school history to earn Indiana All-Star accolade.

Amhad’s Indiana All-Star selection includes him with Brian Gilpin (1992), Daniel Turner (2002) and Michael Ertel (2017), former Marauders.

“Armon got AP all state, and Amhad didn’t. One is an all-star and the other was not. One was Supreme 15 and the other was not. I think it shows when you really look at their stats, they’re literally tenths of a point from each other per game,” Mt. Vernon head coach Ben Rhoades said. “They are not the same. They are different, and they would come at different times. If one had a tough game, the other was willing and understood that he had to take over.

If anything has been proven over the past four years, it’s the Jarrards who work better together than against each other, and rightfully so, they share the honor of being selected as basketball athletes from the 2021-22 All-Hancock County Co-Boys year.

“It’s the reward they get for their hard work and their focus on what they have in hand. They were both focused on going to college and playing basketball. They both wanted to win and have scholarships for IUPUI next year. I’m very happy for them and their family that they’re getting what I think they really wanted out of it,” Rhoades said.

“They had a good experience at Mt. Vernon, and I know we’re going to miss them, but they have brighter things to come.”

Prior to the start of their senior season, the Jarrards cemented their collegiate future by committing to the IUPUI, and it paid off for their mindset.

Able to compete without distractions, the duo had their best seasons in 2021-22 and guided the Class 4A Marauders to back-to-back HHC and sectional championships and 61 wins in four college campaigns.

The Marauders finished the 2021-22 season with a 22-3 record, winning 16 straight games before falling to Ben Davis, 52-50, in the regional semi-finals at Southport on March 12.

The mission for the Jarrards and other Mt. Vernon seniors this season was crystal clear – get back to regional, get back to Southport Fieldhouse.

As juniors, the duo reached the same stage and lost to senior-laden Plainfield in the regional semi-finals. In their second consecutive regional appearance, victory eluded them, once again, but it was only decided in the dying seconds.

“It was pretty good in a way. We came back to regionals, but we couldn’t win. I hate it, but it’s okay. I feel like we had a good career over the years, and I’m so grateful to my teammates and Coach Rhoades and Coach (John) Rockey and Coach Nate (Bingham),” Amhad said.

The Mt. Vernon coaching staff shares that sentiment. It won’t be easy to replace the work ethic and production the twins have provided since Rhoades and his team took over four years ago.

“When I came here, they didn’t really know me and I didn’t really know them. I told them, and all the seniors included, I owe those guys a lot because I was the new one too, and they bought into it. We weren’t all okay every day, but I think we managed to get through it all to be our best, and overall I think it really helped us,” said Rhoades.

“Leadership by example from these guys was so important. They were never too talkative, but they always tried to do the right thing.

The best thing for the Marauders was for the Jarrards to be themselves.

Although more of the social butterfly of the two, Armon has taken off statistically as a senior, averaging 16.3 points per game. The starting point guard posted 3.9 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 2.0 steals a contest, finishing with 997 career points and 119 3-pointers, 262 rebounds, 169 assists and 133 steals.

Amhad, a shooter, nearly duplicated his brother’s final numbers, averaging 14.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.2 steals for 895 points, 287 rebounds, 225 assists, 91 steals and 47 blocks.

Feeding off each other’s energy, the twins were determined to put Mt. Vernon on the map, and voters paid attention to the Marauders who broke in and remained in the Class 4A top 10 a majority of the year.

“There were still people who thought we couldn’t play with the best teams,” Armon said. “That was the motivation.”

Finishing with 11-12 straight seasons as a freshman and sophomore prompted the Jarrards to accelerate their development.

In 2020-21, the Marauders went 17-7 and clinched the program’s first section title since 2018 and 14th overall. This year marked the team’s 15th and first repeat since the Marauders won three straight in 1985-87 and 1990-92.

“It was tough at the start, but we got through it in the end. Our first and second year, we were struggling. We didn’t win the cup. Our record was under 0.500 our first year, so it was good to keep going up over the years,” Amhad said. “We just wanted to keep proving everyone wrong.”

With every win this season, skeptics have turned into believers.

A season-opening loss at 4A Fishers, 65-59, on Dec. 4 led to a six-game winning streak, including a 44-41 win over former 4A No. 1 Zionsville at Mt. Vernon, as ‘Amhad buried the Eagles with a last-second 3-pointer.

After an 87-78 loss at 4A Westfield on January 4, the Marauders went unbeaten for over two months.

Throughout, the Jarrards simply put their heads down and dug.

“Their whole family is calm and reserved, but at the same time they have definitely been leaders for example during the four years. This year I will say, especially after Christmas, I think they’ve both been a bit more vocal and showed more emotion both on the pitch, in games and in training,” said Rhoades. “Everyone saw what the main objective was and wanted to achieve it.”

Now they’re reaping the benefits, including an Indiana All-Star tour for Amhad that comes full circle on June 8 when the Indiana Junior All-Stars take on him and the seniors at Mt. Vernon High School.

Rhoades will serve as an assistant coach for the visiting Indiana Junior All-Stars.

Amhad respects his manager, but he is already making his prediction for the exhibition match this summer at home where he went unbeaten in 2021-22.

“Yes, I have to go undefeated in my senior season at my home gym. I can’t date with an L,” Amhad said with a smile. “Yeah, just like against Zionsville. I’ll look at Coach Rhoades and tell him, I told you.

2021-22 Daily Reporter All-Hancock County Boys Basketball

first team

Armon Jarrard, Mount Vernon

Amhad Jarrard, Mount Vernon

Steele Brasfield, New Palestine

Dylan Moles, Greenfield-Central

Landon O’Neal, Eastern Hancock

second team

Blaine Nunnally, New Palestine

Ian Stephens, New Palestine

Jacob Spaulding, Eastern Hancock

Ray Wells, Mount Vernon

Silas Spaulding, Eastern Hancock

Honorable mentions: Eastern Hancock—Edric Miller, Cole Rainbolt, Grant Gray, Cyrus Burton; Greenfield-Central—Braylon Mullins, Joey Roland; Mt. Vernon – Avery Williams, Jr., Cooper Galli, Eli Bridenthal; New Palestine – Ben Slagley.

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Fall River Nonprofit Hosting Lively Juneteenth Celebration https://therightroadtopeace.com/fall-river-nonprofit-hosting-lively-juneteenth-celebration/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 21:36:52 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/fall-river-nonprofit-hosting-lively-juneteenth-celebration/ After a successful inaugural event last year at Kennedy Park, The Doors of Hope Opportunity & Open Diversity Inc. (D’HOOD) is gearing up for another Juneteenth celebration that will unite the SouthCoast community in a day-long event at park on June 18 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. D’HOOD is a non-profit organization that develops […]]]>

After a successful inaugural event last year at Kennedy Park, The Doors of Hope Opportunity & Open Diversity Inc. (D’HOOD) is gearing up for another Juneteenth celebration that will unite the SouthCoast community in a day-long event at park on June 18 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

D’HOOD is a non-profit organization that develops a multicultural arts and entertainment outreach program for children, based in Fall River.

June 19 story

President Alicia Powell and Vice President Cydney Brown provided insight into the history of Juneteenth, sharing that it is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the end of slavery.

“It wasn’t until June 19, 1865, that Union soldiers were finally able to reach Galveston, Texas, with the news that the war was over and the slaves were now free… two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation,” they said.

It was only last year that the state of Massachusetts declared June 16 a holiday, proving that the importance of this day and its history must spread to the masses.

June 16th Fall River Celebration

In 2021, D’HOOD took over Kennedy Park in honor of Juneteenth, drawing hundreds of people to celebrate African-American freedom and respect for all cultures.

“Our vision for this year is to double that attendance and collaborate even more with neighboring towns and cities as we celebrate freedom, unity and progression,” Brown said.

“Celebrating Juneteenth is important to everyone,” D’HOOD said. “It celebrates African-American freedom and achievement while encouraging continued personal development and respect for all cultures.”

Both Brown and Powell agree that getting involved and supporting the June 19th celebrations creates new friendships and a better understanding of our neighbors while acknowledging how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go.

“We are all one mind. … We are one humanity,” they said.

What to expect this year

Chris Aguiar, Media Manager for the event, gave a preview of what Fall River can expect at this year’s celebration.

“Last year it spread all over Kennedy Park. This year we are trying to condense the area and fill it with vendor tents and an entertainment stage,” he said.

Exciting shows are on the schedule, but Aguiar is keeping them a secret.

Aguiar shared that several motivational speakers, city councilors and officials will speak at the event, along with food trucks and even free food provided by People Incorporated.

Festivals set to hit the South Coast this summer

A pirate festival is coming to Yarmouth this summer, which got Michael and Maddie thinking. What other unique festivals would we like to see happen?

WATCH: Milestones in women’s history from the year you were born

Women have left their mark on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics and technology. Each passing year and each new milestone makes it clear how recent this history is compared to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still have to go. The resulting timeline shows women consistently making history worthy of best-selling biographies and textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll to find out when women in the United States and around the world won rights, the names of women who broke the glass ceiling, and which country’s women banded together to end a civil war.

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Don’t listen to wealthy lobby groups. Our fisheries are carefully managed and well protected https://therightroadtopeace.com/dont-listen-to-wealthy-lobby-groups-our-fisheries-are-carefully-managed-and-well-protected/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/dont-listen-to-wealthy-lobby-groups-our-fisheries-are-carefully-managed-and-well-protected/ Are our coastal fisheries being unfairly criticized? OUR 19 year old son has just bought his first fishing boat, having spent the last two years working for my husband, a semi-retired fisherman. It was his dream to follow the long family tradition, to earn a living and to be able to stay on the island […]]]>

Are our coastal fisheries being unfairly criticized?

OUR 19 year old son has just bought his first fishing boat, having spent the last two years working for my husband, a semi-retired fisherman. It was his dream to follow the long family tradition, to earn a living and to be able to stay on the island of his birth. We are proud and support this aspiration. How disheartening to read Martha Vaughan’s article describing the practices used by our son and other inshore fishers in this area as “mismanaged” and a threat to the ecology of the area, our area (“Scottish Burbot , stingray and stingray added to ‘red list’ for consumers”, The Herald, April 6).

Our son was well educated by his father: target the species you intend to catch; release live undersized lobsters and brown crabs from the trap; limit the number of traps you set, and flip and notch all egg-bearing lobsters. This notch means they cannot be landed and helps maintain healthy stock levels. After all, why would small coastal fishermen seek to destroy their own fishery?

The Marine Conservation Society is not a statutory body, it is a pressure group with a large bank balance that has enabled it to lobby and unleash this latest attack on our culture and livelihoods. The statutory body we listen to is Marine Scotland, both nationally and through the network of fisheries boards. There is industry management and regulation and constant monitoring of stock levels and landings, not the wild west coast your article suggests.

I’m disappointed that, for balance, you didn’t look for the sight of “wellies on the ground” – a Hebridean fisherman.

Christina Campbell, Plockropool, Isle of Harris.

ISRAEL IS THE AGGRESSOR

I WAS stunned to read Adam Tomkins’ article on Israel (“Fears stalks Israel as country faces uncertain future”, The Herald, April 6, and Letters, April 7). There was barely a single paragraph without whitewashed terminology.

Professor Tomkins could not bring himself to describe how the country was actually formed, simply stating that it was “founded” in 1948 and depicting happy kibbutzim flourishing in Yaffa (Jaffa) soon after.

1948 for the Palestinians is synonymous with “the Nakba”, literally meaning “the Catastrophe”. The Palestinians use the key as a symbol of that time – they brought their keys with them, thinking that when the fighting was over they would return home. Many of their villages were completely destroyed. Seven hundred thousand people fled.

It is no coincidence that when discussing the founding of Israel, those who support the state evade the reality of its formation. By ignoring and erasing the people who existed in Palestine before 1948, criticism of the State of Israel can be characterized as purely anti-Semitic – that opponents of Israel deny the right to self-determination.

This ignores the true historical and contemporary context: Israel was formed by displacing people from the land they had been on for generations. People are alive today who lived through this disaster, although many more died without the possibility of returning home. The same behavior can be seen in East Jerusalem today, with the state evicting Palestinians and giving their land to Israeli citizens.

Israel has aggressively used expansionist behavior via illegal “settlements” in the occupied territories. Professor Tomkins glosses over the occupation as governed by the international law of belligerent occupation (Israel is the belligerent. In 2017, the European Council on Foreign Relations called it an “unlawfully prolonged occupation”).

All this, and Professor Tomkins’ friends lament that ‘the Israel their grandparents sought to build is being replaced’. Incredible.

Elspeth Kanaan Brown, Milngavie.

DOUBTS ABOUT NET ZERO POLICIES

THE doubts of Alexander McKay (Letters, April 7) and others about the potential usefulness of net-zero policies are well taken warnings for many reasons.

First, the monetary cost of decarbonising the UK has been estimated by Prime Minister Theresa May to be at least £3 trillion. We cannot afford such a sum. The inevitable consequences include huge domestic, industrial and transportation disruptions, risking dangerous civil upheavals.

Second, doubts are now cast by work in Canada, Denmark and Israel about the main mechanisms underlying our climate change.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) may not be the right target. For molecular and physical reasons, the Earth’s climate is more likely to be under the basic control of the sun, water vapor, humidity, cosmic rays and cloud formation. CO2, at 0.04% of the atmosphere, represents less than 5% of total greenhouse gases. The balance varies with atmospheric humidity. Global warming has stopped over the past two decades, as accurately monitored by NASA satellites to abolish the impact of urban “heat islands”. Meanwhile, CO2 concentrations have continued to rise, proof that CO2 is not the primary driver of global warming.

The relative imminence of a grand solar minimum, based on the sun’s reduced activity, would lead to drops in Earth’s temperatures, as has happened intermittently over the past centuries.

Finally, given that the UK’s share of the world’s total man-made CO2 is negligible at less than 1.5%, haven’t we already reached virtual net zero?

Could governments explain to us the explanation and justification for net zero in the UK?

Charles Wardrop, Perth.

PRIMARY CAUSES

ONE must admire Chris Mason (“All quiet on west London front as job carouselturns”, The Herald, April 4) for overcoming the severe social disadvantage of having had not just one, but two primary school teachers as parents. Maybe he kept something that might have been okay in a red brick a shameful secret when he was at Cambridge. I don’t know if his Yorkshire accent should be seen as an advantage, rather than another social handicap, but personally I haven’t found it to dilute his BBC RP.

Ronald MacLean, Beauly.

AT THE HEIGHT

I NOTE Jim Meikle’s observation that “for men at least, golf is a lot like sex. You can really enjoy it without being good at it” (Letters, April 7).

In my advanced years, still not very good at it, on a good day playing a round lasts more than four hours.

It is obvious. What’s not to like?

R Russell Smith, Largs.

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