Palestine tradition – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:23:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine tradition – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 “Taste the Revolution”, it’s really good https://therightroadtopeace.com/taste-the-revolution-its-really-good/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 17:08:41 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/taste-the-revolution-its-really-good/ It’s no secret that I like beer a lot, everyone who knows me knows that and also my stomach betrays me. I owe the hobby to my father and many good friends who, like my old man, accompany me from other dimensions knowing that I remember them every time I drink a cold beer, also […]]]>

It’s no secret that I like beer a lot, everyone who knows me knows that and also my stomach betrays me. I owe the hobby to my father and many good friends who, like my old man, accompany me from other dimensions knowing that I remember them every time I drink a cold beer, also to people with whom I continue to enjoy the pleasure of a cold beer whenever life allows.

One of my beer dreams has always been to visit Oktoberfest in Bavaria. Enjoy German beer, as it should be, as God intended. Also, I must admit that the typical image of smiling Germans in their “dirndl” carrying huge mugs of frothy beer really appeals to me. But Germany is still on hold and for now I’ve changed this image to typical Palestinian costumes, kufiyas and a newly discovered beer that I love, Taybeh.

A few days ago, I was at the Taybeh Brewery Oktoberfest in the Christian Palestinian town of the same name in the occupied West Bank. An event that has been held since 2005 when, just after the Second Intifada, Nadim Khoury, creator of the popular beer, decided to organize an Oktoberfest to show the world that Palestinians are resisting and that they are people who like to enjoy life.

The courtyard of the factory, usually empty, was decorated for the occasion with a long bar with beer dispensers, a sort of Taybeh altar. There were also typical Palestinian food stalls, handicrafts and a thousand other trinkets. And people, lots of people, a mix of Palestinians, foreigners residing in the West Bank and Israel and even the occasional Jew who, wearing his yarmulke, was cooling off with a cold beer. It looked like a warm, wonderful Tower of Babel where everyone drank beer, enjoyed Palestinian dances and competed in skills, like holding a huge mug of beer the longest.

Taybeh Brewing Company was founded in 1994, after the Oslo Accords of 1993, when Palestinian Nadim Khoury, exiled in the United States, decided to return to the land where his family had lived for more than half a century , excited about the creation of a Palestinian state and determined to make a living from what until then had been his hobby: making beer. “Taste the Revolution” was the slogan chosen to promote the brand. The Golden, the first variety produced and today the most accomplished.

This is how Taybeh, the first craft beer in the Middle East, was born. “A natural beer, without preservatives or additives, with only four ingredients: cereals, hops, yeast and water. Made to German purity standards,” Nadim proudly said.

Both times I visited Taybeh Brewery, I had the chance to speak ― she speaks eloquently and pleasantly as I try to decipher her perfect English ― with Madees Khoury, Nadim’s daughter and first wife with the title of master brewer in the Middle East. A double merit if we consider the machismo that reigns on this side of the world, where in addition the Muslim population does not consume alcohol for religious reasons.

Madees, who currently runs the successful family business, tells me that Taybeh, which emerged as a small business, is now marketed in 17 countries including Germany, Belgium, France, USA, Spain and Japan, all of which have a brewing tradition. It is also sold in Jerusalem, which obviously suits me very well.

“Today we have more than 10 beers and some very special ones,” Madees explains to me, “we have a pineapple Ipa, a salty lemon, a chocolate and a double Ipa. We are also experimenting with Palestinian spices like shumak, zatar or Arabic coffee.”

Interesting experiences, but I’m sticking to the classics, so I’m coming back from Taybeh Oktoberfest with a box of Taybeh Golden, to cool off the hot Jerusalem afternoons and, incidentally, to remember my first beers with my old.


ALEJANDRO ERNESTO

Cuban photographer. More than 30 years of experience as a photo reporter for Cuban and international media. Worked for the press agencies EFE and Notimex. Now independent, in Spain en route to Jerusalem. I have a passion for photographing people, their customs and traditions, their daily lives. Write, tell stories; a new passion that has come to stay.

Alexander Ernesto

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Austin’s housing market will see the most dramatic change in the United States, plus other headline stories https://therightroadtopeace.com/austins-housing-market-will-see-the-most-dramatic-change-in-the-united-states-plus-other-headline-stories/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 10:25:51 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/austins-housing-market-will-see-the-most-dramatic-change-in-the-united-states-plus-other-headline-stories/ Famous Texas Jewelry Star Kendra ScottThe ability to juggle a work-life balance is truly impressive. The founder of her eponymous billion-dollar brand is a newlywed, a returning guest shark for the next season of shark tank, and she is about to file her first memoirs, Born to Shine: Do good, find your joy, and build […]]]>

Famous Texas Jewelry Star Kendra ScottThe ability to juggle a work-life balance is truly impressive. The founder of her eponymous billion-dollar brand is a newlywed, a returning guest shark for the next season of shark tank, and she is about to file her first memoirs, Born to Shine: Do good, find your joy, and build a life you love.

Between a dizzying schedule of brand management, philanthropic endeavors, a multi-state book tour, shark tank duties and nurturing a new blended family of eight, we wonder when the Austin-based entrepreneur will have time to breathe.

Apparently, queso, margaritas and finding joy in the little things keep the entrepreneur going. Scott also credits her marriage to Thomas Evans (her wedding ring is the only piece of jewelry she never takes off) and the relationship with her family, including three sons – Kade, Beck and Gray – as the foundations of her success.

And while her jewelry has been a go-to accessory for more than two decades, her first foray into the literary world was one of vulnerability and determination.

After kicking off his book tour in Houston earlier this week, Scott will be at the company’s South Congress Flagship in Austin this Saturday, Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets for the event are still available on Eventbrite, and each ticket includes a copy of the book, a meet and greet with Kendra, an exclusive tote bag, and more.

Ahead of the Austin event, Scott sat down with CultureMap in Houston to get an exclusive on his next chapter.

CultureMap: How long did it take you to write Born to shine?

Kendra Scott: It took a little over two years from the time I decided to write the book, but in reality I’ve been writing this book for years. I never realized that my journal notes would one day turn into a book. It’s been a long process, but after 20 years of our business, it was honestly the perfect time to write this book.

CM: How did you juggle writing, running the business, and being a working mom?

KS: You know, it’s always a challenge. If someone tells you it’s easy and they get it, I think they’re lying. I wrote this during the pandemic so I was working from home with the support system of my loved ones with me. All our meetings were virtual, so it allowed me to have time to reflect.

I had also just stepped down as CEO and could just focus on being president, designer, and founder. I was able to focus more on our philanthropic endeavors, like our school at the University of Texas (Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership Institute), and focus on writing this book. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do.

CM: How do you relate to yourself personally in the book?

KS: I become very vulnerable in the book and I feel there is power in vulnerability. I hope being vulnerable allows other women or people to share their failures, successes, ups and downs and be authentic.

I also hope that the stories of my childhood, my marriage, my divorce, starting a business and failing a business – all of these things are part of what makes me who I am. In the book, I talk about the power of gemstones. Gems all have veins that are considered imperfections, but that’s really what makes them beautiful.

CM: Is there anything you wrote but then changed your mind?

KS: I pulled out the whole first chapter, and I wasn’t going to put it in there. My editor, who is also my editor, told me the chapter was great and she thought it should be the first chapter.

It made me realize that I had to be honest because the book starts out in a tough place but then takes readers on an amazing adventure.

CM: Can fans expect more books in the future?

KS: You know, I thought about it. Now that this book is out in the world, I don’t think it will be the last. It’s a different way of being creative, and I think I have other stories to tell.

I would like to make a children’s book one day. My eldest son was one year old when I started this business; now he’s 20, so he grew up with the business. Now I have a nine-year-old, and I’ve always read to him. I really hope that children’s books will be part of my future.

KS: Why did you decide to start your reading tour in Houston?

CM: Houston is part of who I am. That’s where I became a Texan. I moved here from Wisconsin when I was 16 and graduated from Klein High School. Moving at 16 and as a junior can be tough, but I was adopted to Klein – the community was so welcoming.

Houston made me the woman I am today. It made me realize that there is more to the world than the small town in Wisconsin where I grew up. Houston is such a dynamic city, full of culture and diversity – I felt like it was really important for me to start here because it was my first start in Texas.

CM: You come back to shark tank for Season 14. How was the experience this time around?

KS: I love to be on shark tank. I’ll be flying to Los Angeles for the premiere with all the other guest sharks on September 23, and it’s exciting because there’s never been a live premiere.

Nothing inspires me more than other entrepreneurs. There are long shooting days, but they pass quickly because it motivates me to meet other entrepreneurs. Many of these people had ideas before the pandemic, and the downtime during the pandemic gave them the opportunity to put their ideas into action. I can witness it a bit in the tank – it’s so much fun.

CM: There’s a lot going on, but is there anything else fans can look forward to before the end of the year?

KS: We just launched engagement rings and a whole bridal collection which is so exciting. We’re expanding into other fine jewelry categories, including diamonds and gold, and adding more customization options than ever before.

Scott Brothers, the line I started with my boys during the pandemic, is also expanding. It’s so much fun that our male customers who were here to buy for the women in their lives can now buy something for themselves. We just expanded to watches as well, so there’s a lot going on.

If you think about it, it took Ralph Lauren 25 years to expand into other categories. Our company has been around for 20 years, so I really love that Kendra Scott’s next phase is so fun and exciting. From a philanthropic perspective, we have given more than $50 million since 2010 to charities for women and children. We are, in many ways, a philanthropic organization within a brand. This is how we measure success, so I look forward to announcing our charitable efforts in the years to come.

We have a solid base and know what we stand for and stand for – I feel like the best is yet to come.

Kendra Scott’s first memoir comes out September 20.

Courtesy of Kendra Scott

Kendra Scott’s first memoir comes out September 20.

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King Charles III: a friend of the Arab world https://therightroadtopeace.com/king-charles-iii-a-friend-of-the-arab-world/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 22:14:33 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/king-charles-iii-a-friend-of-the-arab-world/ LONDON: In November, the Prince of Wales and his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, embarked on the first overseas tour by a member of the British royal family since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, which had temporarily interrupted these trips two years earlier. For those familiar with the interests closest to the prince’s heart, […]]]>

LONDON: In November, the Prince of Wales and his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, embarked on the first overseas tour by a member of the British royal family since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, which had temporarily interrupted these trips two years earlier.

For those familiar with the interests closest to the prince’s heart, the choice of the Middle East as his destination comes as no surprise.

By visiting Jordan and Egypt, the Prince was honoring his lifelong commitment to building bridges between different religions and cultures, and exercising his fascination and love for a region with which he has always been deeply engaged.

During his visit to Jordan, the prince was keen to express his admiration for the work being done in the country on behalf of refugees, many of whom had been displaced by the war in Syria.

Prince Charles plays with children during his visit to King Abdullah Park for Syrian refugees in the town of Ramtha, north of Amman, on March 13, 2013. (AFP)

He was particularly concerned about the plight of refugees throughout the region. In January 2020 he was announced as the first UK patron of the International Rescue Committee, the organization working in 40 countries “to help people survive, recover and take control of their future”.

In Jordan, he met and spoke to some of the 750,000 people hosted by the country, many of whom depend on support from donor countries including the UK and Saudi Arabia.

The prince’s sense of the region’s history, which in many cases is inextricably linked to that of his own country, is acute. While in Jordan, he planted a tree to symbolize the Anglo-Jordanian partnership and to mark the centenary of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan – a product of the Allied defeat of the Ottoman Empire in World War I, and which eventually gained independence from the British Mandate in 1946.

In Cairo, the prince and the duchess were welcomed by President Abdel Fattah El-Sissi. It was the prince’s second trip to Egypt. He had previously visited in 2006, as part of a tour which also included Saudi Arabia and which was carried out to promote better understanding and tolerance between religions, and to support environmental initiatives and the promotion of sustainable employment and training opportunities for young people. .


Sheikh Ahmed Al-Tayeb (CL), Grand Imam of al-Azhar, receives Britain’s Prince Charles and Camilla upon their arrival at the mosque in Cairo on November 18, 2021. (AFP)

After visiting the Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo, the prince highlighted his commitment to interfaith harmony in a speech delivered at Al-Azhar University.

He said: “I believe with all my heart that responsible men and women must work to restore mutual respect between religions, and we must do everything in our power to overcome the mistrust that poisons the lives of many. people.

Similar to his mother, who died on Thursday, Charles has always been dedicated to ecumenism and promoting harmony among religions.

As King Charles III, he now inherits Queen Elizabeth II’s role as Supreme Governor of the Church of England and the title of Defender of the Faith – and, like her before him, he has always made it clear that he considered this role to be better defined. as an advocate for all faiths.

During a BBC interview in 2015, he said: “It has always seemed to me that while at the same time being a defender of faith, you can also be a defender of religions.

“The Church has a duty to protect the free practice of all religions in this country.”

With over 3 million Muslims in the UK, Islam is the country’s second largest religion and Charles’ interest in this religion is well known.

In 2015, during a tour of the Middle East that took him to Jordan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, it emerged that the prince had spent the previous six months learning the Arabic with a private tutor, in order to be able to read the Koran in its original language, and to better decipher the inscriptions in museums and other institutions during his many trips to the region.

A royal aide revealed the prince was “hugely interested in the area”.

Known for his passion for Islamic history, art and culture – at Cambridge University in the 1960s the prince studied archaeology, anthropology and history at Trinity College – Charles is always very interested in the heritage of the Middle East.

In particular, he closely followed and repeatedly visited the extensive archaeological works taking place in and around AlUla and the ancient Nabatean city of Hegra, inscribed in 2008 as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


Next, Prince Charles (3R), accompanied by then-Saudi tourism chief Prince Sultan bin Salman (4R), visits the historic town of AlUla in the province of Medina on February 11, 2015. (AFP)

During a visit to Saudi Arabia in 2013, he enjoyed a tour of Wadi Hanifa and watched with great interest a presentation on the Diriyah project, which is transforming the historic Wadi into a destination for global cultural tourism, with the Preserved ruins of Diriyah, capital of the first Saudi state and birthplace of Saudi Arabia, in its heart.

Charles is a keen artist, and this interest is reflected in his personal website, princeofwales.gov.uk – in the process of being updated to reflect his new position – on which four watercolors he painted in the Middle East are presented.


In this combination image from Prince Charles’ personal website, his Middle Eastern paintings are shown clockwise from top left: Gulf of Aqaba, Jordan (1993); Port of Suez, 1986; overlooking Wadi Arkam, Asir Province, 1999; and Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia, 2001.

The oldest, dated 1986, is that of a ship in Port Suez, Egypt. Two others are landscapes painted in Saudi Arabia – a view of Wadi Arkam in the remote southwestern province of Asir in 1999, and a study of a historic palace in Diriyah, painted in 2001.

Since his investiture as Prince of Wales in 1969, Charles has made countless visits to countries in the region, both formally and informally. Private visits aside, as Prince of Wales Charles has made five official visits to Jordan, six to Qatar, seven to Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates and 12 to Saudi Arabia.

It was a tradition that began in 1986 when he embarked on a nine-day tour of the Middle East, during which he visited Oman, Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia with his wife. ‘then, Diana, Princess of Wales, from whom he would separate in 1992.


Prince Charles and Princess Diana in Jeddah in the late 1980s. (Getty Images)

The number of meetings he has had at home and abroad with members of royal families in the Middle East – more than 200 over the past decade, including those in Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates.

As Prince of Wales, it was part of Charles’s job to promote the mutual interests of Britain and its allies, and in pursuit of this duty he made numerous formal and informal visits to Saudi Arabia, Britain’s most influential ally in the region.

The prince’s role as a bridge between his country and all the Gulf nations, in particular, has always been mutually beneficial. For example, the day after a visit to Riyadh in February 2014, during which the prince valiantly accepted an invitation to don traditional Arab dress and participate in a sword dance, it was announced that the British aerospace company BAE had reached an agreement for the sale to the Kingdom of the 72 Typhoon fighter jets.

As Prince of Wales, Charles had many charitable interests, but perhaps none have been as global in vision as the Prince’s Foundation, dedicated to “realizing the Prince of Wales’ vision of building communities for a more sustainable world”.

Focused on education, heritage appreciation and creating equal opportunities for young people at home and abroad, the foundation has conducted satellite programs in more than 20 countries, including Saudi Arabia. and Egypt, where it operates permanent centres.

In Saudi Arabia, the foundation has set up a vocational training program in building arts and crafts in Jeddah’s old city, Al-Balad, giving students the opportunity to get involved in the restoration projects of the Ministry of Culture in the city.

During the Winter at Tantora festival, held in AlUla from January 10 to March 21, 2020, the foundation held an exhibition titled “Cosmos, Color and Craft: The Art of the Order of Nature in AlUla,” and curated a series of hands-on workshops in conjunction with the Royal Commission for AlUla.

In the United Arab Emirates, since 2009, the foundation has worked with the Abu Dhabi Music and Arts Foundation to offer traditional arts workshops in the capital.

During his visit to Egypt last year, the prince met young artisans from the Egyptian Heritage Rescue Foundation and the Jameel School. Supported by the Prince’s Foundation, the school teaches young Egyptians lessons in traditional Islamic geometry, drawing, color harmony and arabesque.

Unsurprisingly, the foundation attracted donations from many influential friends in the area. As Prince of Wales, Charles’ ties to the royal families of the region have always run deeper than the necessary ties required by wise diplomacy.

For example, he considered King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia a personal friend and, after the monarch’s death in January 2015, flew to Riyadh to pay his last respects and express his condolences to his successor, King Salman, in person.

In the person of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, who died on Thursday, the Middle East and its peoples had a lifelong friend, close to its leaders and committed to building and maintaining bridges between religions and cultures.

In King Charles III, this precious friendship is clearly destined to continue uninterrupted.

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Collective exhibition at the Jameel Arts Center to explore the urgent theme of water https://therightroadtopeace.com/collective-exhibition-at-the-jameel-arts-center-to-explore-the-urgent-theme-of-water/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 09:19:51 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/collective-exhibition-at-the-jameel-arts-center-to-explore-the-urgent-theme-of-water/ Detail of Asuncion Molinos Gordo How many rivers up there! installation at the Travesía Cuatro gallery in Madrid. Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer Art Jameel opens a major new group exhibition, An Ocean In Every Drop, at Jameel Arts Centre, Dubai’s center for contemporary arts (September 22 – April 2, 2023). With its title inspired by […]]]>

Detail of Asuncion Molinos Gordo How many rivers up there! installation at the Travesía Cuatro gallery in Madrid.

Mohammad Yusuf, Feature Writer

Art Jameel opens a major new group exhibition, An Ocean In Every Drop, at Jameel Arts Centre, Dubai’s center for contemporary arts (September 22 – April 2, 2023). With its title inspired by a 13th century poem by Rumi – “You are not a drop in the ocean. You are an ocean in every drop” – the exhibition speaks to the centrality of water in forming of our world and the complex web of relationships produced by water and its use.

It features 15 regional and international artists from 14 countries, First Nations and Indigenous communities, from ancient Persia to the United Arab Emirates. Bringing together existing works and new commissions ranging from large-scale installations and audiovisual works to manuscripts and works on paper, An Ocean in Every Drop seeks to rekindle our relationship with water throughout history, from 10th century to the present day, exploring the vast and ancient ways in which water shapes human development, produces history, culture, language and social relations.

By relating bodies of water as living beings, the show attempts to mark a transformation in our own approach to the climate emergency, by centering our role and our relationship to the issue today. Exhibiting artists include Jumana Emil Abboud, Martha Atienza, Raven Chacon, Cian Dayrit, Leuli Eshraghi, Asuncion Molinos Gordo, Abul Hisham, Candice Hopkins, Sohrab Hura, Hussein Naserreddine, Thao Nguyen Phan, Daniel Otero Torres, Karan Shrestha, Fatima Uzdenova and Munem. Wasif, as well as the works of the 10th century geographer and writer, al-Istakhri. Abboud (b. 1971) is a Palestinian artist living and working in Jerusalem.

A dazzling shot from Becoming Alluvium single-channel color video by Thao Nguyen Phan.

She draws inspiration from her own past and Palestinian culture and traditions in her installations. She explores memory, storytelling and oral history through the body and its use of Palestinian folklore and fairy tales. Her art frequently features the Palestinian landscape and she focuses on memory, the impact of memory fragmentation, and the impact of history on a person’s current life. His piece Hide Your Water from the Sun, is a three-channel video installation, which features video of the sites featured in a 1920 survey of places that once contained springs and other bodies of water that have since been lost , but whose locations are part of Palestinian folklore.

Born in Manila, Philippines to a Dutch mother and Filipino father, Atienza’s video installations are visions drawn from her Filipino and Dutch sides. His work is a series mostly constructed in video, of a sociological nature that studies his direct environment. Chacon (b. 1977) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning artist known as a composer of chamber music.

His visual and sound works have been widely exhibited in the United States and elsewhere. Dayrit works in painting, sculpture and installation. His interdisciplinary practice explores colonialism and ethnography, archaeology, history and mythology. Eshraghi is active across Samoa, Australia and Canada, and is of Samoan/Persian/Cantonese ancestry.

The artist prioritizes the global visuality of indigenous and Asian diasporas, spoken languages, and ceremonial and political practices. In his practice, Gordo explores different forms of dominance in intellectual inquiry, from urban to rural. Hisham’s works manipulate characters he has seen and experienced in his social environment.

Hopkins (b. 1977) is an independent Carcross/Tagish First Nation curator, writer and researcher who primarily explores the fields of Indigenous history and art. Hura (b. 1981) is an Indian photographer based in New Delhi. He is a full member of Magnum Photos. Naserreddine lives and works in Beirut.

Her installation, writing, video and performance work originates from a practice around language that constructs fragile monuments anchored in collective histories such as ruins, construction and the making of images. Phan (b. 1987) is a Vietnamese visual multimedia artist, whose practice encompasses painting, filmmaking and installation.

She references her country’s turbulent past while observing social conventions, history and tradition. Torres’ work is grounded in the reconstruction of ideology through handmade drawings on aluminum and steel. With stories from every day and every people, Shrestha’s work seeks to blur the opposites that construct and define our individual and collective identities, presenting them as flawed – and therefore effectively human.

Uzdenova’s practice is rooted in the idea of ​​a garden as a place of conquest, spiritual ground, and source of nourishment. Wasif’s installations often mix photography with moving images, archival documents or collected objects, to reveal notions of impermanence and insecurity. Istakhri was a 10th-century author-traveler and geographer who wrote valuable accounts in Arabic of the many Muslim territories he visited during the Abbasid period of the Islamic Golden Age.

His account of windmills is the oldest known. Nora Razian, Head of Exhibitions, Art Jameel, said: “The exhibition is part of a multi-faceted attempt by Art Jameel to address the climate emergency and the role of arts and culture in shaping of our understanding of it. With Cop27 in Cairo in November 2022, then in the United Arab Emirates in 2023, this is a key moment for the region to commit to reducing its footprint and tackling resource scarcity responsibly.

An Ocean In Every Drop takes place alongside Art Jameel’s participation in the World Weather Network (WWN), which includes a “weather station” at the Jameel Arts Centre. Art Jameel is one of 28 arts organizations around the world forming WWN, a global ‘weather report’ project that will run until June 2023 in which artists and writers share ‘weather reports’ in the form of observations , stories, images and imaginations about their local weather and our common climate, creating an archipelago of voices and points of view on this global platform.

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The Bristol DA candidate has voted five times in 17 years https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-bristol-da-candidate-has-voted-five-times-in-17-years/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 16:13:05 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-bristol-da-candidate-has-voted-five-times-in-17-years/ Bristol County District Attorney candidate Shannon McMahon appears to have voted five times since 2005, including in a single mayoral election in her hometown of Swansea in April 2022. This is according to his voting history listed on the Votebuilder subscription vote tracking service and confirmed by Swansea Town Hall. McMahon is challenging current Bristol […]]]>

Bristol County District Attorney candidate Shannon McMahon appears to have voted five times since 2005, including in a single mayoral election in her hometown of Swansea in April 2022.

This is according to his voting history listed on the Votebuilder subscription vote tracking service and confirmed by Swansea Town Hall.

McMahon is challenging current Bristol DA and fellow Democrat Thomas Quinn for the seat, marking the first contested race for the Bristol County prosecutor in 16 years.

Shannon McMahon Voting History

Screenshot from Votebuilder.com

Quinn has voted 33 times during the same period, including 11 municipal elections, six municipal primaries, eight state/national primaries and eight general elections, according to Votebuilder.

Voting history of Thomas Quinn

Screenshot from Votebuilder.com

From 2005 to 2016, McMahon appears not to have voted at all, while Quinn has voted regularly in municipal and general elections and primaries since at least 2005.

McMahon did not respond to multiple requests for comment on her voting history or questions about when and why she chooses to vote.

Quinn has served as district attorney since 2015.

Her campaign focused on her experience in the role and various initiatives her office has undertaken to address elder abuse and resolve cold cases.

Quinn said McMahon’s previous arrest for domestic violence should disqualify her from the role of DA.

McMahon and her husband Bryan Dunderdale say the arrest was linked to an unusual assault caused by Dunderdale’s brain cancer treatment.

The charge was dismissed.

WATCH: Milestones in women’s history from the year you were born

Women have left their mark on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics and technology. Each passing year and each new milestone makes it clear how recent this history is compared to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still have to go. The resulting timeline shows women consistently making history worthy of best-selling biographies and textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll to find out when women in the United States and around the world won rights, the names of women who broke the glass ceiling, and which country’s women banded together to end a civil war.

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what these places are used for today. (If they remained standing.)

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Hornet Football Goals: Improve Every Day, Compete for IVC Title https://therightroadtopeace.com/hornet-football-goals-improve-every-day-compete-for-ivc-title/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 17:45:21 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/hornet-football-goals-improve-every-day-compete-for-ivc-title/ Malvern Football head coach Matt Chiurco will be leading a young side this year but he has plenty of returning experience. Of the 13 returning scholars, only two are seniors. The team lost several at graduation, including Tristan Phillips, Bryson White, KJ Thomas, Noah Ball (IVC North Player of the Year), Sam Foster, Will Steinberg, […]]]>

Malvern Football head coach Matt Chiurco will be leading a young side this year but he has plenty of returning experience.

Of the 13 returning scholars, only two are seniors. The team lost several at graduation, including Tristan Phillips, Bryson White, KJ Thomas, Noah Ball (IVC North Player of the Year), Sam Foster, Will Steinberg, Kaden Grinder, Johnny Walker and Trevor Slider.

“We have 11 guys who started at least one game last year. Our young lads want to carry on the Malvern tradition and create their own legacy,” Chiurco said. “Even though we are young, we really like the team we have. We have a lot of young talent and we know we will improve as this season goes on.”

Frank McClelland and KJ Wafler are back from senior letters. McClelland was named 2nd team DVII East District last year. At 6’5” and 280 lbs., he will anchor a very good offensive line. Wafler, will be key as a wide receiver (WR) and defensive back (DB).

Returning junior men of letters include Zach Babiczuk, Kyle Bossert and Chance Miller, all over six feet tall, who will work with McClelland on the offensive line. Charles Motz, running back (RB)/WR/linebacker (LB); Dante Passio, tight end (TE)/RB/LB; Dylan Phillips, WR/DB; Ryan Runyon, RB/outside linebacker (OLB)/Kicker; and Manny Walker, RB/LB. Bossert had 41 tackles; Motz, 20; Walker, 11; and Phillips, seven. Phillips recorded 97 yards. Reception, one touchdown and one interception last season. Runyon was 26/33 in point-after-touchdown kicks.

Returning sophomore literati include Drake Hutchison, RB/LB with 58 yards. on the ground, one touchdown and 21 tackles; Rodney Smith, WR/DB; and Jared Witherow, quarterback/free safety, 30 tackles and one interception in 2021.

“We have a new quarterback in Jared Witherow. Jared is a very smart kid with a huge arm,” Chiurco said. “Even though he’s just a sophomore, I think he can have a very good year for us. We are really excited about its potential.

Top newcomers include OL/DL sophomores Conner Chalmers and Corey Thompson, who are both tagged as starters. Chalmers will work with McClelland and company. Top freshman newcomers include Darnell Jackson, RB/LB; Julius Gore, WR/RB/DL; Rocco Marinucci, WR/DB; and Owen Ball, WR/DB.

With nearly 30 players, the Hornets will be able to play a full JV season and Chiurco noted, “for our freshmen and sophomores, that’s huge.”

On offense, Phillips, Smith and Wafler will be wide receivers. “We’re really going to try to get the most out of Dylan. He is a very good athlete,” added Chiurco.

They also have quite a few players to carry the ball into the backfield; Hutchison, Phillips, Runyon, Motz and Jackson.

“Defensively, I think we will have a solid unit. We think we have a really good secondary and we’re relying heavily on our front seven at the start of the season to stop this run,” Chiurco said, adding, “We have a really good junior kicker Ryan Runyon.

Even though the squad is young and inexperienced for the most part, Chiurco said they were a fun bunch to be around.

“They always come ready to work. We want to focus on improving every day as the season progresses,” he said. “We feel like we have a team that can win a lot of football games, but we have to develop and more importantly we have to stay healthy.”

As for the outlook for the season, Chiurco expects the Inter Valley Conference (IVC) North to be wide open.

“We expect to win and fight for another IVC championship. Even though we’re young, our guys still expect that,” Chiurco said. and now they think it’s their turn. It seemed like every team had a big senior class (last year). It’s going to be a fun year.

Jeremy Taylor, Curtis Metzger, Todd Phillips, Adam Haught and Jim Rittenhouse assist Chiurco in its fifth year. Dan Clear and Travis Tucci are college coaches.

The Hornets open the road season Aug. 19 in East Palestine. Kick off is at 7 p.m.

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Central Indiana’s best players talk about hometown pride https://therightroadtopeace.com/central-indianas-best-players-talk-about-hometown-pride/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 10:53:33 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/central-indianas-best-players-talk-about-hometown-pride/ There’s a new energy at the start of every high school football season. It’s the start of something new. A new school year. A new season. The opportunity for some teams to change fortunes and others to keep to raise the level of already well-established traditions. It’s also a chance for us to do something […]]]>

There’s a new energy at the start of every high school football season. It’s the start of something new. A new school year. A new season. The opportunity for some teams to change fortunes and others to keep to raise the level of already well-established traditions.

It’s also a chance for us to do something new. Our “First and 10” project, coordinated by award-winning photojournalists Grace Hollars and Robert Scheer, captures 10 of Central Indiana’s top high school football players away from the field and in their hometown or near school. Each of the players explains what playing for their respective schools on Friday night means to them.

We hope you enjoy this new feature as we prepare for the 2022 high school football season:

Speedway senior running back Deejay McFerson pictured Friday, July 22, 2022, at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Speedway

Position: Athlete

To classify: Senior

Middle School: Undecided

What does it mean to you to play for Speedway? “Becoming a Sparkplug means a lot to me because I met a lot of great people around me who helped me become who I am today. When I started little league for Speedway, my coach was Jake Beyer, and he’s still my high school coach and made me a better player with my teammates who are still the same teammates I play with now Saying all this is because I’ve only met people I i want to surround myself and that they are just family so every friday night with my brothers is very personal because we are still the underdogs so we will keep working and accomplishing what we know what he gotta do and get that state championship.

Nick Patterson
Mooresville senior quarterback Nick Patterson (9) pictured Tuesday July 12, 2022 in the Mooresville countryside.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Mooresville

Position: QC

To classify: Senior

Middle School: Undecided

What does playing for Mooresville mean to you? “I love it. The Curry Crazies (student section) bring the energy on Friday nights and the coaching staff gives us confidence. It’s surreal when I see little children shouting my name. It’s like I’m famous but i’m not famous but it feels good and it gives me a lot of confidence I will definitely miss it because nothing is better than Friday night lights Winning is fun and it’s a fun environment for us in Mooresville.

leighton jones
Brownsburg senior offensive lineman Leighton Jones (65) pictured Tuesday July 5, 2022 at Mizell's Barber Shop in Brownsburg.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Brownsburg

Position: offensive line

To classify: Senior

Middle School: Iowa

What does playing for Brownsburg mean to you? “To me, Brownsburg is a football town. As a kid, I grew up counting the days until I could be the high school football player coming out of the tunnel with smoke. The citywide tradition of showing up and cheering us on every other Friday night is electric. Every home game seems to be sold out. No matter the game, homecoming, Avon week or even just a great game in general, the community shows us so much love. We raise over $50,000 in our fundraiser each year because the community and administration support the team so much. For me there is no better place to play than Roark Stadium, there are no better fans, they have won many Spirit Awards. If you go to eat at local breakfasts in town as a player, they’ll congratulate you on a hard-earned victory the night before. For anyone who hasn’t attended a Friday Night Football game at Roark Stadium, they won’t forget it. Each graduated player comes back for a few games a year and encourages us just as these players did before them. I can’t wait to take my last lap in the best community.

Danny O'Neil
Cathedral junior quarterback Danny O'Neil pictured Tuesday, August 2, 2022 at Cathedral High School in Indianapolis.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: cathedral

Position: Strategist

Year: Junior

Middle School: Undecided

What does playing for Cathedral mean to you? “For me, playing for Cathedral is like a brotherhood. You won’t find a better culture than that of the dressing room at Cathedral. The long history and greatness of all the teams that have come before us puts a target on our backs. That means get everyone’s best game. When teams see they have Cathedral on their schedule, they circle us because of who we are and what we’ve accomplished. I wouldn’t have it any other way. We play for the best coaches and the best school in the state. Running around on the field in those golden helmets is a special feeling. However, our coaches prepare us to shine when game time arrives and the lights are on. No one is no better prepared and more inspired to be great than our football team. We expect nothing less than what we have achieved in the past two years. With all the accolades that Cathedral has achieved es, winning a 6A state title is something that has never been done before. So that’s my expectation and my goal for the season.

Luke Burgess
New Palestine senior offensive lineman Luke Burgess (76) pictured Thursday, June 30, 2022 at New Palestine Hardware.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: New Palestine

Position: offensive line

Year: Senior

Middle School: Louisville

What does playing for New Palestine mean to you? “Playing for New Pal means everything to me. From head coach to players. I don’t think there is a better program to uplift me as a football player and as a young man. Being able to “Being the brilliant team and aspect of the community is a great feeling like no other. Having the stands full every Friday night is always a sight to behold. I wouldn’t want any other coaches, or community, for whom to play.

Trevor Lauck
Roncalli primary offensive lineman Trevor Lauck pictured Tuesday, August 2, 2022 at Roncalli High School in Indianapolis.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: roncali

Position: offensive line

Year: Senior

Middle School: Iowa

What does playing for Roncalli mean to you? “Playing football for Roncalli is really something special. When we go there every Friday, we know that we are playing for much more than ourselves. We are playing for the community and the thousands of men who have worn this uniform. I truly believe it’s an honor to wear this jersey every week. Fridays on campus are pretty electric. I think you can always feel a buzz at school that it’s game day, especially for home games. After the school day is over, we head to mass, then it’s time to concentrate. Then, when game time finally comes, there’s no better feeling than to run out of the woods with your best friends in front of a huge crowd full of friends and family. But once that’s over, there’s one more thing we know we still have to do. WIN.”

George Burhenn
Mt. Vernon senior tight end George Burhenn (81) pictured Wednesday July 6, 2022 at the Rockin 4W Ranch owned by Tony and Jodi Wills in Fortville.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Mount Vernon

Position: tight end

Year: Senior

Middle School: Purdue

What does playing for Mt. Vernon mean to you? “Playing for Mt. Vernon on Friday night is a very special thing because the whole week the game is excited and when it comes to game time it’s a cool feeling to realize that everyone is watching you, you and your team, and you were the little kids in the booth cheering for the team and now you’re the team I grew up watching Mt. Vernon football all my life and watching my brother play for a while time, that definitely makes playing for Mt. Vernon special.

Joshua Mickens
Lawrence Central defensive lineman Josh Mickens pictured Friday, July 20, 2022 at Fort Harrison State Park in Indianapolis.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Lawrence Central

Position: defensive end

Year: Senior

Middle School: USL

What does playing for Lawrence Central mean to you? “LC has become more than the place where I play football and where I go to school, it has become my home. So because of that, playing there is even more special and because of the love they showed me. It makes me want to put my best foot forward every time I step on this pitch. Friday nights are very special to me, but this year will be even more so because I I have a few more reasons to go harder than last year, so now I’m just ready to make it happen.

Aycen Stevens
Decatur Central linebacker Aycen Stevens pictured Thursday, August 4, 2022 at Decatur Central High School in Indianapolis.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: Central Decatur

Position: Linebacker/quarterback

Year: Senior

Middle School: Virginia Tech

What does playing for Decatur Central mean to you? “Man…. What does it mean to me to play under those lights in a Decatur Central jersey? It means the world to me, and I’m sure when the time comes, it will be hard for me to let it go. the feeling you get when you step out of that tunnel with your best friends you grew up with is something you can’t put into words. From being the little kid with long blonde hair running down the sidelines, d ‘Being the ballboy on Friday nights, to now enter my senior year, it’s been quite a journey but I wouldn’t trade my story for anything. This community has always been great for my family, and I have only respect for Decatur Central Growing up with the last name Stevens, I guess people probably expected me to play football, but I tried to write my own story with my older brother Tommy. has represented quite well, and I want to continue to lean er on that.”

Winston Berglund
Carmel senior defensive back Winston Berglund (5) pictured Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in downtown Carmel.
Grace Hollars/Indy Star

School: carmel

Position: Security

Year: Senior

Middle School: Purdue

What does playing for Carmel mean to you? “It’s definitely a privilege to play football for Carmel and her coach (John) Hébert. Everyone involved in the team holds each other accountable and supports each other – the culture is second to none. During my four years, I learned the art of discipline and humility. Playing for Carmel also taught me how to treat others and give back to his community. I love playing for coach Hébert. Playing on Friday night is so much fun, you just have to go out and compete against your butt and with your best friends. It’s also a time when the whole town can come together and support each other. There is nothing else like it. Go dogs.

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Brother Bits – News https://therightroadtopeace.com/brother-bits-news/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 15:55:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/brother-bits-news/ — Corrected: A souvenir from Ron Sider included in the latest issue of Newsline neglected to include the previous name of the organization Sider is best known for founding: Evangelicals for Social Action. This organization is now known as Christians for Social Action. —Galen Fitzkee ends his year of service with Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) […]]]>

— Corrected: A souvenir from Ron Sider included in the latest issue of Newsline neglected to include the previous name of the organization Sider is best known for founding: Evangelicals for Social Action. This organization is now known as Christians for Social Action.

—Galen Fitzkee ends his year of service with Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) on August 12. He has been associated with the Church of the Brethren’s Office of Peacebuilding and Policy in Washington, D.C. He will begin new work as a Legislative Associate for the Mennonite Central Committee Office of Peace and Justice Ministries.

— Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) Summer Unit 331 meets for orientation at Camp Wilbur Stover in New Meadows, Idaho, Aug. 9-17. BVS. “Ten volunteers, including five from EIRENE [a partner organization based in Germany]. EIRENE volunteers, from our winter unit, were able to obtain visas in the country. This is the first time orientation has been held at Camp Wilbur Stover. For more information on BVS, visit www.brethren.org/bvs.

—Taylor Peterson begins August 13 as youth coordinator for the Northern Ohio District of the Brethren Church. She is from the North Bend congregation, is a teacher, substitute teacher and works part-time in a hardware store.

— SERVV International has appointed Kate Doyle Betts as the new President and CEO. She has held senior marketing positions, including 22 years with Williams-Sonoma in merchandise and inventory planning. A fair trade organization founded by the Church of the Brethren 72 years ago, SERRV partners with 8,000 artisans in 24 countries to market craft and food products through e-commerce, catalog and wholesale operations. It has offices and warehouses in Madison, Wisconsin and at the Brethren Service Center in New Windsor, Maryland, as well as Westminster, Maryland.

— Community Peacemaker Teams (CPT) announced a new Palestinian delegation scheduled from November 3 to 14, 2022. “Olive trees have always been symbols used to describe Palestinian resistance in their land, and the olive harvest season is the season that brings Palestinian families together and reminds them of the importance of defend their homeland,” the ad said. “Join a delegation from CPT Palestine to find out how the Israeli occupation is making the annual harvest more difficult for these families, but also to find out how Palestinians still find joy in the area. H2 and the South Hebron Hills.” The application deadline is October 21. Go to www.cpt.org.

— A summit on climate resilience is scheduled as an online event for Thursday, August 18 from 5-8 p.m. EST with sponsorship from Creation Justice Ministries, among others. Creation Justice Ministries grew out of the National Council of Churches and is an ecumenical partner organization of the Brethren Church. An announcement said: ‘The impact of climate change on our communities is no longer in doubt. We all feel these impacts in one way or another, whether it’s heat waves, wildfires or floods. Often our faith helps us through these difficult times by providing us with food, shelter, or hope for a better future. But beyond reaction, how can faith communities be centers of resilience, helping our neighbors weather the physical, social and spiritual storms of the climate crisis? How do we plan and build a world in which the most vulnerable are not simply protected from these climate impacts, but empowered to thrive? The evening will include panel discussions, workshops and presentations from faith communities, scholars and government officials from across the country. Guest speakers and panelists include Queen Quet, Chief and Head of State of the Gullah/Geechee Nation; Beth Norcross of the Center for Spirituality in Nature; Emily Wirzba of the Environmental Defense Fund; Miyuki Hino, assistant professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at UNC-Chapel Hill; with Rick Spinrad, Administrator of the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA), delivering the closing remarks. Find a full program and register at https://secure.everyaction.com/FcF6s8F4kUeS8s0aQeR0EQ2.

Annual Conference leadership held meetings at the Brethren’s general church offices last week. The program and arrangements committee, including the annual conference officers, has met, as has the denominational leadership team and the worship leadership team for the upcoming 2023 annual conference.

Above: The Program and Arrangements Committee shown here in the General Offices Chapel (left to right): Beth Jarrett, Jacob Crouse, Conference Secretary David Shumate, Nathan Hollenberg, Moderator-Elect Madalyn Metzger, Moderator Tim McElwee and Conference Director Rhonda Pittman Gingrich.

Below: The Worship Leadership Team Shown here in one of the courtyards of the General Offices (from left to right): Don Mitchell, David W. Miller, Beth Jarrett (Chair and Program and Arrangements Committee Liaison) and Laura Stone.

(Photos by Cheryl Brumbaugh-Cayford)

In an update from the annual conference, the total bid received for Girls Inc. of Omaha, the “host city witness,” now stands at $14,162.71. The offer included monetary donations received on-site and online as well as by mail over the following weeks, and on-site donations of material goods filling three pallets overflowing with backpacks, school and art supplies, games, sports equipment, hygiene supplies, clothing, etc. . Read Newsline’s article on Girls Inc. of Omaha and how the annual conference offering will help at www.brethren.org/news/2022/brethren-donations-support-girls-inc.

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BREAKING: Longtime Oklahoma Sooners assistant Cale Gundy quits program https://therightroadtopeace.com/breaking-longtime-oklahoma-sooners-assistant-cale-gundy-quits-program/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 04:02:11 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/breaking-longtime-oklahoma-sooners-assistant-cale-gundy-quits-program/ In a shocking late-night development, Oklahoma’s longest-serving assistant coach steps down. Cale Gundy, who has been involved with the program as both a record quarterback, tireless assistant and top scout, announced on Twitter that “with great anguish I announce my resignation.” Gundy’s decision comes after an incident he described in a lengthy post: “I owe […]]]>

In a shocking late-night development, Oklahoma’s longest-serving assistant coach steps down.

Cale Gundy, who has been involved with the program as both a record quarterback, tireless assistant and top scout, announced on Twitter that “with great anguish I announce my resignation.”

Gundy’s decision comes after an incident he described in a lengthy post:

“I owe it to Sooner Nation to be transparent about what led to this decision,” he wrote. “Last week, during a cinema session, I asked my players to take notes. I noticed one player was distracted, picked up his iPad and read aloud the words that were written on his screen. The word displayed had nothing to do with football. A particular word that I should never have – under any circumstances – pronounced, appeared on this screen. At the time, I didn’t even realize what I was reading, and as soon as I did, I was horrified.

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Equestrian Dreams: A Hopeful Vision of the Sons and Daughters of Life https://therightroadtopeace.com/equestrian-dreams-a-hopeful-vision-of-the-sons-and-daughters-of-life/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 11:09:36 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/equestrian-dreams-a-hopeful-vision-of-the-sons-and-daughters-of-life/ RIYADH: Gamers8 welcomed the world’s best Fortnite teams and players to Saudi Arabia this weekend, with the elite competition concluding with a second winning pair on Sunday night. With a $2 million prize pool up for grabs in the highly anticipated four-day Fortnite tournament in a purpose-built arena at Boulevard Riyadh City, Nigma Galaxy’s Malibuca […]]]>

RIYADH: Gamers8 welcomed the world’s best Fortnite teams and players to Saudi Arabia this weekend, with the elite competition concluding with a second winning pair on Sunday night.

With a $2 million prize pool up for grabs in the highly anticipated four-day Fortnite tournament in a purpose-built arena at Boulevard Riyadh City, Nigma Galaxy’s Malibuca and TSM’s EpikWhale took the Standard version crown. The 359 points accumulated in Sunday’s final earned them the top prize of $250,000 in that format, with Malibuca also taking home an additional $100,000 to be the weekend’s MVP.

The winners of the Zero Build tournament, who also collected $250,000 in prize money, were Anas from Guild Esports and Pinq from Tundra Esports. They scored 320 points in their event, which ended Friday night.

Malibuca said: “I am delighted with the victory. I think I will be three times more confident in my online tournaments from now on because (I) was really nervous to play this tournament and a huge boost to win. I don’t know yet what I’m going to do with the money; I don’t have a lot of money and I’m saving up, so winning is great. I may be looking to buy a house.

Partner EpikWhale added: “The win adds a lot of confidence to my game, especially playing in a LAN event with top players from all regions, Brazil, Asia, Middle East, Europe and North America. Winning at this makes it easier to go back to playing only Western players. Money is really cool, but I’m also happy that I can do what I love and be successful at it.

“I want to thank the Saudi Esports Federation for hosting us. I never thought before that I would be in Saudi Arabia to play and my time here was truly memorable.

Meanwhile, Anas commented on his Zero Build victory saying, “We are so happy with this achievement. The competition was high level and we felt the pressure throughout the two days, but we are happy that we managed to bring it home at the end. Pinq is the perfect partner and I’m so happy that we were able to win this tournament together. I want to thank the Saudi Esports Federation for organizing such a great tournament, it’s our first time here in the Kingdom and we absolutely loved it.

Pinq said, “That feeling of winning is so special, but what’s even more special is playing against some of the best Fortnite players in the world and coming out on top. The second day was the hardest, but we worked well together and stayed calm until the end. The atmosphere was great, we could hear the fans cheering and supporting us even with our headsets on.

Pinq also sent a special message to young Saudis who aspire to one day hold his position, commenting, “Keep practicing and developing your skills, it will eventually pay off and you will be where you want to be.”

Zero Build – where building is disabled in this mode, but the Overshield is enabled – took place on July 28 and 29 over 12 matches and involving 44 duos, and on a points-based system. Second place in the tournament went to Manchester City Esports’ Trippernn and Hellfire, who claimed $150,000. Nigma Galaxy’s Malibuca and TSM’s EpikWhale won $100,000 after finishing third.

Duo Standard Battle Royale, using the standard ruleset, took place on July 30 and 31 – also involving 12 matches, with 44 duos – with second place going to Chapix and zAndy, from Saudi outfit Team Falcons, who won won $150,000. Setty and Kami of Become Legends claimed $100,000 after finishing third.

Faisal bin Homran, Head of Esports at the Saudi Esports Federation, said: “Fortnite weekend at Gamers8 was a special occasion for gamers and spectators alike, and fully demonstrates the level of global gaming events in elite that Saudi Arabia is capable of hosting. .

“By hosting high profile tournaments such as Fortnite at Gamers8, we know we can truly inspire and empower more fans and players in the Kingdom and beyond. The success of the Fortnite tournament, following the popularity of Rocket League and the Dota 2 Riyadh Masters, makes us very proud and determined to continue delivering an amazing Gamers8 season.

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