Palestine demographics – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 17:34:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine demographics – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 Is Israel using the Ukraine crisis to tilt demographics in its favor? https://therightroadtopeace.com/is-israel-using-the-ukraine-crisis-to-tilt-demographics-in-its-favor/ Tue, 29 Mar 2022 16:36:20 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/is-israel-using-the-ukraine-crisis-to-tilt-demographics-in-its-favor/ The Middle Eastern country’s concern about the European conflict may go beyond humanitarian reasons. Israel has made numerous statements in recent weeks welcoming Ukrainian Jews”residenceto Israel, if they seek to emigrate. Unlike the Ukrainians with Temporary protected status (TPS) in the EU – which, as its name suggests, offers temporary protection – all Jews can […]]]>

The Middle Eastern country’s concern about the European conflict may go beyond humanitarian reasons.

Israel has made numerous statements in recent weeks welcoming Ukrainian Jews”residenceto Israel, if they seek to emigrate. Unlike the Ukrainians with Temporary protected status (TPS) in the EU – which, as its name suggests, offers temporary protection – all Jews can claim citizenship without questions under the Law of Return, even if they have never visited .

“This is an important moment, a moment for which we were destined and for which the State of Israel was created,” Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said two weeks after the start of the conflict in Ukraine. Tel Aviv said it expects up to 100,000 Jews to arrive from Ukraine — and even Russia — in the coming months.

“The great mission is to open doors, to open hearts, to welcome our brothers and sisters fleeing a difficult war. Be sure that [they will have a reception that] will even alleviate a bit of the trauma they are going through, an inconceivable trauma – uprooting themselves in a matter of hours or days and moving to a distant and different country,” Bennett continued.

Despite talk of humanitarianism amid the trauma, Israel announced that only 5,000 new non-Jewish Ukrainians could come to Israel as refugees, while 20,000 would already be permit remain during the conflict.

This positioning exposes Israel’s discriminatory motives and alludes to a policy of opening borders to a population – not necessarily because they are in need – but rather as a means of modifying the national framework. demographic.

This is a perfect opportunity for Tel Aviv to use Ukrainian refugees as a means to gain demographic dividends, knowing that global sympathy for Ukrainians could overshadow such a politically motivated resettlement plan.

Unknowingly or not, President Zelenskyy and other members of his team have brought water to Israel by repeatedly reiterating that Ukraine is to like Israel, defending itself against “total destruction”. It is unclear what the purpose of this rhetoric is – whether to win the sympathy of the Western public or to attempt to distort all the violations of international law and human rights that Israel commits on a daily basis.

Achievement of the resettlement objective

The UN recently announced that about 3.7 million Ukrainians have fled the violence in their country since it began on February 24, adding that in the first ten days of the conflict, some two million people have been displaced.

The majority of these people have sought refuge, mainly in countries neighboring the European Union. In fact, Ukrainians and residents of Ukraine are eligible for TPS and are therefore granted a renewable residency period of one to three years and access to health care, education and housing.

The European Commission has even allocated 500 million euros — a quarter of its total humanitarian budget — to the Ukrainian crisis, so that support is both available and easily accessible.

Since the beginning of the crisis, the media like certain politicians have continued to vomit racist rhetoric against refugees from diverse backgrounds, while the rhetoric about Ukrainians has been consistent and unqualified.

This then begs the question of why Israel, a country in the Middle East, which is both currently and persistently violating international human rights, is stepping in and vouching for support for Ukrainians, especially when a large part of the international refugee “problem” is centered in the Middle East region?

To underscore both the conscious construction and dedication to this project, two key observations can be made. First, the announcement of the World Zionist Organization dedicating 1,000 new units to Ukrainian Jews, who have become Israelis. These units are located in the occupied Golan Heights as well as in the occupied Naqab region. The Golan Heights is still disputed by Syria as sovereign Syrian territory. This statement has been validated by many international organizations including the United Nations.

Second, Israel has established, through the Jewish Agency for Israel, an organization that supports and funds Jewish immigration and settlement in Israel and occupied Palestine, several Ukrainian border stations for Ukrainian Jews, and provided direct flights to Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv. In a single week, the agency raised $15 million.

To elaborate, Ukrainian Jews were essentially called to return “home”. This assertion in itself is contradictory because Ukrainians have faced violence in their country of origin and are waiting for this to be resolved before they can return. Israel, unlike the EU, however, does not see it that way. This injustice is not only observed by comparing the treatment of said refugees with that of native Palestinians, but also by considering migration and the mistreatment of Ethiopian Jews.

This plan, while ostensibly created to support those facing a humanitarian crisis, appears to be just another method to “increase” the number of Jews in Israel. Israelis would do well to remember that these are people fleeing a conflict zone and may not be as eager to erase their nationality and culture to claim demographic dominance in a country as they probably have never visited before.

Disclaimer: The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views and editorial policies of TRT World.

We welcome all pitches and submissions to TRT World Opinion – please email them to opinion.editorial@trtworld.com

Source: World TRT

]]>
Housing demand and demographics https://therightroadtopeace.com/housing-demand-and-demographics/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/housing-demand-and-demographics/ NORTHAMPTON: Demography plays an important role in influencing house prices. Seminal research on housing prices in the United States by N Gregory Mankiw and David N Weil in 1989 showed that the quantity of housing demanded exhibits a sharp increase between 20 and 30 years, with a large proportion of households becoming owner-occupiers, which stabilizes […]]]>

NORTHAMPTON:

Demography plays an important role in influencing house prices.

Seminal research on housing prices in the United States by N Gregory Mankiw and David N Weil in 1989 showed that the quantity of housing demanded exhibits a sharp increase between 20 and 30 years, with a large proportion of households becoming owner-occupiers, which stabilizes around the age of 40 and declines thereafter.

These age groups may vary from one country to another, but the central hypothesis is that older households consume less housing than middle-aged households. Therefore, a lower proportion of prime-age buyers leads to lower house prices.

There is a large body of literature that examines various factors contributing to housing prices (supply, demand, institutional development of financial and mortgage markets), however, the role of demographics in influencing housing demand and prices has received little attention.

How do demographic changes affect house prices?

Demographic changes affect house prices through a number of different channels. These include the impact of changes in life expectancy, international immigration, urbanization and fertility.

In advanced economies, sustained increases in life expectancy over time, resulting in aging populations, declining fertility and changing family structures, can be seen to have a negative impact on prices overall housing.

A recent Brookings Institution report on US housing shows that US demographics have changed significantly over the years.

Among other trends, multigenerational and mixed family households have increased as US households “double down” to reduce housing costs. However, this has not kept pace with the proportional increase in the housing stock.

This finding is also supported by a recent report by the Greater London Authority, which shows that the overall housing stock has not kept pace with population increases in various global cities such as London, New York, Sydney and Vienna.

The Pakistani case

Pakistan’s population explosion and rapid urbanization have put immense pressure on decent and affordable housing. The latest data from the 2017 census shows that Pakistan’s population grew by 57% between 1998 and 2017.

A report by the IGC “A Framework for Affordable Housing in Pakistan” states that with an urban population expected to grow by 2.3 million per year over the next 20 years, this translates into a demand of 360,000 households. , or 6.3 individuals per household.

A demographic breakdown of the population from the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics from 2007 shows that nearly 53% of the population is in the youngest age group ranging from 0 to 19 years.

Applying Mankiw and Weil’s (1989) life-cycle hypothesis, with little or no likelihood of the youngest age group becoming homeowners, it is generally expected that Housing prices remain high due to strong demand from older age groups (30s and beyond).

Policy responses

Growing pressure on urban areas of Pakistan due to migration and population expansion is leading to increased demand for housing. However, no proportionate policy response exists to deal with the provision of affordable and decent housing in the country’s growing urban cities.

Moreover, the lack of open access data from statistical agencies also reflects a general lack of attention or priority towards data-driven decision-making.

Access to quality and timely data sources can prove very beneficial for public sector authorities, not only in terms of providing adequate and affordable housing, but more importantly in regulating any potential property price bubbles. .

The writer is a PhD student at Bartlett, UCL

Published in The Express Tribune, February 7and2022.

As Business on Facebook, to follow @TribuneBiz on Twitter to stay informed and join the conversation.

]]>
Latinos are leaving the workforce at higher rates than other demographics, report finds https://therightroadtopeace.com/latinos-are-leaving-the-workforce-at-higher-rates-than-other-demographics-report-finds/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/latinos-are-leaving-the-workforce-at-higher-rates-than-other-demographics-report-finds/ (CNN) – While Friday’s jobs report shows a robust job marketa record number of workers left their jobs in 2021. A new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that 4.3 million Americans quit in December alone. The latest figures come as data shows Latinas are leaving the workforce at higher rates than any […]]]>

(CNN) – While Friday’s jobs report shows a robust job marketa record number of workers left their jobs in 2021.

A new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that 4.3 million Americans quit in December alone.

The latest figures come as data shows Latinas are leaving the workforce at higher rates than any other demographic group, worrying economists.

But for many women who quit during the pandemic, the decision is paying off.

The University of California, Los Angeles’s Latino Policy and Politics Initiative found that between March 2020 and March 2021, the number of Latinas in the workforce fell by almost 3%.

“Some of our most discerning and critical workers are going to be pushed out of the workforce and that’s going to be detrimental to all Americans,” said Sonja Diaz, founding executive director of the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs.

Researchers say the mass exodus was caused by many women losing their jobs, with others leaving to focus on family needs, citing a lack of childcare support exacerbated by COVID-19.

For women like Erika Cruz, her six-figure technical work has simply become unsatisfying. The idea of ​​quitting was sparked while making TikTok videos, and she became the founder of Purpose Driven Latina.

“My account kind of exploded,” she said. “Once I decided to leave, I had already successfully completed part of my group coaching program, Purpose Driven Latina, and my job at that time almost took me away from that passion project.”

Cruz said her decision came with sacrifices, such as moving in with her mother, who lost her job as a housekeeper during the pandemic.

“It was hard to leave work because my mom was basically dependent on me,” Cruz said. “But I really had to trust my intuition.”

She’s not the only one. Personal finance expert Jully-Alma Taveras said more and more Latin clients are coming to see her, wanting to create “job exit plans”.

“When you think about equal pay, Latinas don’t make that dollar at all,” she said. “We’re talking about 57 cents for every white man’s dollar. So I think it’s really hard for Latinas to kind of stay.

It’s a trend that has some economists worried about how it might impact workplace diversity amid a national labor shortage.

“We need workers who are in the kinds of jobs that are both available now and will be in the near future,” Diaz said.

Copyright 2022 CNN. All rights reserved.

]]>
Gregg County Health Department Plans To Use Federal Grant To Educate Demographics With Low COVID-19 Vaccination Rates https://therightroadtopeace.com/gregg-county-health-department-plans-to-use-federal-grant-to-educate-demographics-with-low-covid-19-vaccination-rates/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/gregg-county-health-department-plans-to-use-federal-grant-to-educate-demographics-with-low-covid-19-vaccination-rates/ LONGVIEW, Texas (KLTV) – This week, the Gregg County Commissioners Court approved a $ 380,000 federal COVID-19 health disparity grant for the Gregg County Department of Health. “The four groups of people were the homeless, low-income, African-American and Hispanic communities, to provide education and also try to get more immunization rates if possible,” said Dr. […]]]>

LONGVIEW, Texas (KLTV) – This week, the Gregg County Commissioners Court approved a $ 380,000 federal COVID-19 health disparity grant for the Gregg County Department of Health.

“The four groups of people were the homeless, low-income, African-American and Hispanic communities, to provide education and also try to get more immunization rates if possible,” said Dr. Lewis Browne, the Gregg County Health Authority.

“Their percentages of vaccine levels are below average and we’re trying to reach those areas to get them involved in the process,” said Gregg County Judge Bill Stoudt.

The grant will provide funding for educational and community outreach programs, such as this weekend’s collaboration at the East Texas Yamboree with the Vaccine Awareness Coalition and Health on the Move in East Texas.

“What we need to do is meet our customers where they are. And a lot of times that literally means going to where they live and meeting them where they are, ”said Anita Lowe, clinical instructor at UT Tyler Longview campus. “Specifically in communities that have a greater disparity related to social determinants and care. “

“There is a lot of mistrust within some communities, so we are trying to get, to regain their trust,” said Ashley Sloan, immunization program manager for the Gregg County Health Department.

“We’re finally in the third, fourth quarter, we’ve reached the 20-yard line, and we want to win on the goal line, but there are still areas that we need to address, and this grant is going to help us. to do it, ”Stoudt said.

The next Gregg County Health Department community outreach will take place on November 12 at the Highway 80 Rescue Mission.

Copyright 2021 KLTV. All rights reserved.


Source link

]]>
How the demographics of COVID-19 deaths have changed since vaccines became available: NPR https://therightroadtopeace.com/how-the-demographics-of-covid-19-deaths-have-changed-since-vaccines-became-available-npr/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/how-the-demographics-of-covid-19-deaths-have-changed-since-vaccines-became-available-npr/ NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Samantha Artiga of the Kaiser Family Foundation about racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths. LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST: We have repeatedly heard from officials that this is now a pandemic of unvaccinated people. Most people who die and get sick have not been vaccinated against COVID-19. So does this mean that the […]]]>

NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Samantha Artiga of the Kaiser Family Foundation about racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths.



LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

We have repeatedly heard from officials that this is now a pandemic of unvaccinated people. Most people who die and get sick have not been vaccinated against COVID-19. So does this mean that the demographic composition of those affected by this pandemic has changed? To answer this question, we are now joined by Samantha Artiga. She is Vice President and Program Director of Racial Equity and Health Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Welcome to the program.

SAMANTHA ARTIGA: Thank you very much for inviting me.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: At the beginning of this pandemic, it was mostly black people and Latinos who were affected. They were the front line workers – weren’t they? – those who were in low-income communities with systemic problems, with access to health care. And they may have had underlying conditions. Has this changed since the vaccine?

ARTIGA: So what we see when we look at the cumulative data since the start of the pandemic is that we continue to see disparities in terms of higher rates of infection, illness and death among people from color. And above all, when age differences are taken into account, these gaps are even greater. But when we look at trends in the data over time, we find that the disparities in illness and death, especially for blacks and Hispanics, have narrowed over time. And so those gaps are not as large as they were in the early stages of the pandemic.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So I guess the difference is that the vaccine is online. What do you think explains this narrowing of racial disparities?

ARTIGA: So I think a key factor is certainly the deployment of vaccination. Vaccinations provided increased protections across racial and ethnic groups, and we saw that while Hispanics and Blacks were less likely to have been vaccinated during the early parts of the vaccination rollout, these disparities in vaccinations are also shrinking now. I think at the same time, there are a series of other factors that may influence these trends, including an increased spread of the virus among the white population due to various factors.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We’ve seen a lot of stories, haven’t we? — about its impact on predominantly white communities in the Midwest and South, for example, where people might not want to get vaccinated for a variety of reasons, but some of them might be political. How big is this disparity now between white people and people of color in terms of impacts?

ARTIGA: So when we look at the very latest data on case rates and death rates, there’s little difference in rates per 100,000 among whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Again, this does not control age. When we control for age, we generally see larger disparities because people of color tend to be a younger demographic. If we look at how the pandemic has evolved over time, initially much of the push happened in urban areas, which are more racially diverse. We now see since the end of 2020 that much of the virus is occurring in more rural areas. At the same time, we know that vaccination rates are lower in rural areas and that rural areas are home to a higher proportion of white residents. So, this geographic shift over time in the spread of the virus may lead to increased spread among the white population.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How do you think these trends will change, if at all, when children under 12 start getting vaccinated?

ARTIGA: Well, we know that children under 12 are a particularly racially diverse population. I think expanding vaccine eligibility to children under 12 will also continue to narrow some of the gaps we still see in vaccination rates because they include a greater proportion of children of color. So really, this expansion only reinforces the continued focus on equity as we continue to work to increase immunization rates and recover from the pandemic.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Last question – obviously this country has been brutalized by the delta variant – 2,000 deaths a day, although those numbers are going down. As someone looking at this data for a living, what do you think we’ll see in the future?

ARTIGA: I think it’s important to recognize that while the demographic patterns of those most affected by the pandemic right now are changing, the underlying structural inequalities that have exposed people of color and low-income populations income at increased risk at the start of the pandemic have not changed. And so, they still remain at heightened risk as the pandemic continues to evolve and potential future health threats may emerge.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: This is Samantha Artiga from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Thank you very much.

ARTIGA: Thank you very much.

(MUSIC SOUND EXTRACTION)

Copyright © 2021 NRP. All rights reserved. Visit the Terms of Use and Permissions pages of our website at www.npr.org for more information.

NPR transcripts are created under tight deadlines by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative recording of NPR’s programming is the audio recording.

]]>
Ward 9: Candidates, demographics and voter mood https://therightroadtopeace.com/ward-9-candidates-demographics-and-voter-mood/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/ward-9-candidates-demographics-and-voter-mood/ Ward 9 encompasses a wide range of communities from the east of downtown to the eastern outskirts of the city. He has an incumbent councilor running for re-election. Scroll down for a list of candidates About 88,000 people live in the neighborhood, making it smaller than average in terms of population. They live in around […]]]>

Ward 9 encompasses a wide range of communities from the east of downtown to the eastern outskirts of the city.

He has an incumbent councilor running for re-election.

  • Scroll down for a list of candidates

About 88,000 people live in the neighborhood, making it smaller than average in terms of population.

They live in around 39,000 houses, with a mix of housing types.

About 43% of the homes in Ward 9 are single-family homes. Duplexes, multiplexes and townhouses account for 23%, while apartments and apartment-style condominiums account for another 23%.

Ward 9 Debates

Ward 9 candidates debated local issues at a candidates’ forum on September 21.

You can read the forum coverage here:

Are you organizing or planning to attend another forum or debate in the future?

Let us know! Please email: calgarynewstips@cbc.ca with details.

Survey Results by Neighborhood

In partnership with the University of Calgary, CBC News conducted a poll in July to find out what Calgarians think about municipal issues.

The poll, conducted by Forum Research, asked more than 2,200 people a series of detailed questions on a wide range of topics.

The sample size was large enough to provide neighborhood-by-neighborhood results, although these results come with a higher margin of error due to the smaller number of respondents.

  • More details on the survey methodology can be found at the end of this article

Respondents were asked to rank the importance of several high-profile – and often controversial – municipal issues addressed by city council over the past year.

The results presented below represent the importance people place on an issue for them personally, not whether they agree or disagree.

Here’s how the people of Ward 9 reacted. (Click on an issue for a recent CBC News article on this topic.)


Residents of Ward 9 were also asked if they were happy with Calgary’s current mayor and city council.

Remember: This poll was taken in July, so it’s a snapshot of voter sentiment at that time.

Residents were surveyed at the same time about their satisfaction with the provincial government. The results for this question are included here for comparison purposes.


To gauge how Ward 9 residents feel about the future of Calgary and their own future in the city, we also asked them to consider whether they would still be living here in five years.

Residents were asked to rate the likelihood that they would still live here on a scale of 0 to 100%.

Here’s how they responded.


So that’s a snapshot of how Ward 9 voters feel.

Next, here are the candidates vying to be the next councilor to represent the ward.

Click on a candidate’s name to visit their website or social media page, if available.

Citizen satisfaction over time

The City of Calgary also conducts annual citizen satisfaction surveys.

Taken together over several years, these surveys offer insight into how attitudes in each neighborhood have changed over time.

Here’s how the feelings of Ward 9 residents have evolved over the past five years:

Ward 9 Communities

The neighborhood includes the following communities:

  • Albert Park/Radisson Heights
  • Alyth/Bonnybrook
  • Applewood Park
  • Belvedere
  • Bridgeland/Riverside
  • Dover
  • Erin Woods
  • Forest Heights
  • forest lawn
  • Inglewood
  • Manchester
  • Ogden
  • Penbrooke Meadows
  • Ramsay
  • Red carpet
  • renfrew
  • southview
  • twin hills

Click here to return to the main Municipal Elections page.


Survey details and methodology:

The survey was conducted by Forum Research on behalf of Canadian Municipal Elections Study with results based on a web-based recruitment telephone survey of 2,209 randomly selected eligible voters in the City of Calgary. The survey was conducted between July 6 and August 4, 2021.

For comparison purposes, the margin of error for a random sample of the same size would be plus or minus 2.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Results at the neighborhood level and other subsamples have a margin bigger.

Sample sizes in wards range from 213 in ward 4 to 78 in ward 5. Therefore, estimates in ward 5, in particular, should be interpreted with caution as they carry a significantly higher margin of error . .

CBC News includes all neighborhood-level data, as it represents some of the most detailed neighborhood-level polls conducted in Calgary to date.

The Canadian Municipal Elections Study also used a statistical technique known as multilevel and post-stratification regression (MPR) to adjust subsamples at the neighborhood level to better match known characteristics of the population. in each neighborhood.

More details on the full survey and methodology can be found here.

The information at the top of this article on the population and housing composition in each neighborhood comes from the City of Calgary Open Data Catalog.

]]>
2020 U.S. Census Results: Demographic Trends in Falls Church https://therightroadtopeace.com/2020-u-s-census-results-demographic-trends-in-falls-church/ Mon, 16 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/2020-u-s-census-results-demographic-trends-in-falls-church/ FALLS CHURCH, VA – The past 10 years have marked a dramatic shift in the demographic makeup of the United States, with a marked decrease in the white population and rapid growth in the Hispanic / Latino community. These changes were reflected in Falls Church, where the city’s white population fell to 69.7 percent of […]]]>

FALLS CHURCH, VA – The past 10 years have marked a dramatic shift in the demographic makeup of the United States, with a marked decrease in the white population and rapid growth in the Hispanic / Latino community.

These changes were reflected in Falls Church, where the city’s white population fell to 69.7 percent of the city’s population in 2020, from 79.6 percent in 2010, while the Hispanic / Latino population is increased from 9.0 percent in 2010 to 10.4 percent in 2020.

Overall, the population of Falls Church has grown from 12,332 in 2010 to 14,658 in 2020.

In Virginia, the white population fell by 277,996 people (-5.1%), while the Hispanic / Latino population increased by 276,924 people (43.8%).

Falls Church has also shown an increase in the number of people who have identified as multiracial, although the reasons are complex. Experts say the increase reflects changes in the way people identify themselves as well as the number of children born to parents of mixed race or ethnicity, as well as changes in the wording of the census forms themselves. same.

In 2020, 11.9% of the population of Falls Church, or 1,737 people, identified as two or more races, up from 4.0%, or 489 people, in 2010.

In Virginia, the number of people who identified themselves as two or more races increased by 472,307, or 202.4%.

The Asian population in Falls Church totaled 1,499 in 2020. As a percentage of the overall population of Falls Church, the Asian population grew to 10.2% in 2020 from 9.4% in 2010.

The black population in Falls Church totaled 576 in 2020. As a percentage of the overall population of Falls Church, the black population fell to 3.9% in 2020 from 4.3% in 2010.


Source link

]]>
Dick Durbin: Demographics Republican Election Bills https://therightroadtopeace.com/dick-durbin-demographics-republican-election-bills/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/dick-durbin-demographics-republican-election-bills/ Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D., Ill.) Speaks during a press conference at the United States Capitol in Washington, DC on March 16, 2021. (Kevin Dietsch / Pool via Reuters) During a speech to Congress, Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin suggested that Republican-dominated state legislatures pass election bills as a defense mechanism because the GOP […]]]>

Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D., Ill.) Speaks during a press conference at the United States Capitol in Washington, DC on March 16, 2021. (Kevin Dietsch / Pool via Reuters)

During a speech to Congress, Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin suggested that Republican-dominated state legislatures pass election bills as a defense mechanism because the GOP has lost its competitive power and no longer represents the majority of Americans .

“America’s demographics are not on the side of the Republican Party. The new voters of this country are moving away from them, away from Donald Trump, away from the creed of their party that they preach, ”said Durbin. He said GOP defectors are switching allegiances to become independent or join the Democratic Party.

In the 2020 election, former President Donald Trump won the support of a minority, among Latinos, African Americans, Asians and women, increasing the share of GOP votes among these identity groups.

The second-largest Senate leader said the wave of voting laws passed in Republican states was “on purpose” and a coordinated tactic to deny Americans the right to vote. Durbin referred to the Senate Rules Committee’s visit to Georgia on Monday to discuss what Democrats believe is voter suppression.

“Remember, this is all done against the backdrop of a former president, the biggest loser in US history, and his big lie about what was wrong with the last election. I can tell you what was wrong in the last election. Turnout in many states has broken records. More Americans, eligible to vote, have turned out to vote, and that’s a good thing in a democracy, ”Durbin told the Senate.

He dismissed former President Trump’s electoral fraud allegations and his exhaustive lawsuits, saying the investigations had validated only a “handful of cases” out of millions of votes cast.

“So there is no argument to change electoral and electoral laws on the basis of fraud. There is certainly no argument regarding the outcome of the elections. It was clear and it was clear to everyone, except for a long-time former president, ”he added.

To stop the bloodshed and preserve his eligibility and presence in government, Durbin asserted that “Republicans are reducing and restricting the ability to vote.”

Tip the press team at NR.



Source link

]]>
Israel is also changing the demographics of the Golan Heights https://therightroadtopeace.com/israel-is-also-changing-the-demographics-of-the-golan-heights/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/israel-is-also-changing-the-demographics-of-the-golan-heights/ Replicating the model of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv aims to create a Jewish majority with illegal settlements on the occupied Golan Heights. While Israel’s recent attacks on Gaza and the illegal deportations of Palestinians in East Jerusalem were in the media spotlight, there is another territory that Israel has illegally occupied and it is out of […]]]>

Replicating the model of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv aims to create a Jewish majority with illegal settlements on the occupied Golan Heights.

While Israel’s recent attacks on Gaza and the illegal deportations of Palestinians in East Jerusalem were in the media spotlight, there is another territory that Israel has illegally occupied and it is out of the sight of the media. since many decades.

The Golan Heights is part of Syria which has been under Israeli occupation since 1967. Its history is not much different from East Jerusalem or the West Bank.

Today, there are more than 30 Jewish settlements in the territory occupied by Israel, housing an estimated 20,000 Jewish settlers whose presence is illegal under international law.

This despite the fact that the Golan Heights is also home to some 25,000 Syrian Druze Arabs, who have already rejected Israeli citizenship in the hope that one day the region will be reintegrated into Syria.

But attracting settlers is no easy task. The area, surrounded by tall yellow grass and landmines, is next to the Syrian border but a half-hour drive from the nearest Israeli settlement. Despite the small agricultural activities, there is little or no industry.

As a result, Israeli officials aim to increase the number of Jewish settlers in the heights to establish a Jewish majority in the occupied territory.

Israeli Colonial Minister Tzipi Hotovely announced the construction of new settlements to house 300 Jewish families last year after President Trump officially recognized the strategic mountain plateau as Israeli territory in 2019.

Local leaders representing the settlements hope that with recognition of Israeli sovereignty, the region will attract investment as well as new settlers.

The mayor of the Katzrin settlement in the occupied Golan, Dmitry Apartzev, plans to outnumber the natural inhabitants of the heights.

Apartzev had previously said they aimed to increase the number of Jewish settlers to 100,000 in the occupied territory.

Israel captured the Golan Heights during the Six Day War along with armies from neighboring Egypt, Syria and Jordan and has occupied two-thirds of the strategically important territory since then. This decision has never been recognized by the international community.

Israeli officials believe the area belongs to Jews, as mentioned in sacred Jewish texts. But militarily, the area is strategically important.

The Golan Heights are over 300 meters above sea level and the highest mountain under Israeli occupation Hermon is located to the north, clearly overlooking Damascus, the Syrian capital.

The topography also provides a natural buffer against any military push from war-torn Syria.

Additionally, the region provides a third of Israel’s water supply from the Sea of ​​Galilee and the Jordan River. Previous peace talks collapsed after Israel refused Syria’s demand for a full Israeli withdrawal from the region in order to maintain control over major water sources.

Israel’s complete annexation of the Golan Heights has not been recognized by any international organization.

Source: TRT World


Source link

]]>
Behind the demographic shifts that are reshaping political power in the United States: NPR https://therightroadtopeace.com/behind-the-demographic-shifts-that-are-reshaping-political-power-in-the-united-states-npr/ Thu, 29 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/behind-the-demographic-shifts-that-are-reshaping-political-power-in-the-united-states-npr/ NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Alexa Ura, reporter for the Texas Grandstandabout demographic shifts that are pushing Sunbelt states like Texas to grow in population and political power. MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: Here is an excerpt from new US Census figures released this week. The Northeast continues to stagnate or lose its population. And […]]]>

NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Alexa Ura, reporter for the Texas Grandstandabout demographic shifts that are pushing Sunbelt states like Texas to grow in population and political power.



MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Here is an excerpt from new US Census figures released this week. The Northeast continues to stagnate or lose its population. And places like Texas, Colorado, and Florida — well, they’re growing, so much so that those states will add seats to Congress in the next session. We wanted to understand how people and political power evolve in this country. And to do that, we’re going to focus on just one state: Texas. It gets two new seats, the only state that will get more than one. Here to explain why, Alexa Ura. She is a demographics reporter at the Texas Tribune. Salvation. Welcome.

ALEXA URA: Hello. Thank you for.

KELLY: Looks like we’ve been hearing about Texas growing for a while now. What jumped out at you about these new 2020 Texas Census numbers?

URA: I think as someone who has watched this very closely over the last few years, it has indeed ended up increasing largely because of residents of color and a growing population there. Although our growth was not as significant as it was in the 2010 census, it was still quite gigantic. And the implications of this both politically and economically are quite enormous. And I say that knowing what it’s like to hear a Texan say that.

KELLY: Just to unravel a little bit what’s driving population growth, is it also people who decide, hey; I’m going to move; I’m not going to put up with New England weather or whatever in other parts of the country, and move to Sunbelt states like Texas?

UR: Yeah. I think if you look at the growth in a place like Texas over the last decade, people often think of Texas and think of some kind of immigration hotbed. But in reality, much of our growth has come from growing families, especially families of color. When you look at the share of Texans who are 18 and under, they’re going to lean towards Hispanics and Blacks. And of course, you know, we’re known as a state that attracts people from many other states. And that’s largely driven by the economic pools that exist in Texas.

KELLY: And explain what it is.

UR: Yeah. We have quite a diversified economy, don’t we? So in Houston we have the oil and gas industry. In Austin, we have a lot of tech industry. But it’s also, you know, the farm workers of the Rio Grande Valley. And when you combine all of those things, you end up with a state that is creating jobs and has jobs available.

KELLY: At the heart of it all is political clout. Population as reflected in census counts, of course, determines how many members of Congress the state has, how federal resources are allocated. What are the implications of a more politically powerful Texas?

URA: When you think about that growth in congressional districts, that obviously translates to two more votes in the Electoral College. And Texas is one of those red states where the margin has narrowed dramatically at the presidential level in recent election cycles. And so when you think of emerging battleground states, those are states that are diverse. And when you look at a state like Texas, that might end up being kind of a really interesting case study of how politics changes when you have Hispanic and black people becoming a bigger and bigger part of it. global electorate and change politics.

KELLY: Do you think the demographic trends in Texas give us any idea of ​​where the rest of the country is heading?

URA: I don’t think what’s happening in Texas is unique to Texas, especially when you think of the biggest states in the country and those that are growing. They also have quite a large Hispanic population, when you think about Texas and what representation means and the people represented are from different backgrounds and different identities and what that means for who holds power in the state.

KELLY: Alexa Ura from the Texas Tribune, thank you very much.

URA: Glad to be here.

Copyright © 2021 NRP. All rights reserved. Visit the Terms of Use and Permissions pages of our website at www.npr.org for more information.

NPR transcripts are created under tight deadlines by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative recording of NPR’s programming is the audio recording.

]]>