Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 07:02:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 Coffee and Arab Culture Week in Campinas Schools https://therightroadtopeace.com/coffee-and-arab-culture-week-in-campinas-schools/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 04:34:15 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/coffee-and-arab-culture-week-in-campinas-schools/ (MENAFN- Brazilian-Arab News Agency (ANBA)) São Paulo – Students from public schools in Campinas, São Paulo, are having a special week. It’s Education and Coffee Week, which introduces coffee into school meals and lessons as a subject for study, art projects, musical activities and recreation. The initiative includes references to Arab culture such as the […]]]>

(MENAFN- Brazilian-Arab News Agency (ANBA))

São Paulo – Students from public schools in Campinas, São Paulo, are having a special week. It’s Education and Coffee Week, which introduces coffee into school meals and lessons as a subject for study, art projects, musical activities and recreation. The initiative includes references to Arab culture such as the study of the Arab origin of coffee and the presence in the meal menu of kofta, a food widely consumed in Arab countries like Lebanon. In the photo above, launch of the week.

Coffee expert and project creator Ali El-Khatib said the week should now be a tribute to the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People on November 29 and Lebanese Independence Day on November 22. . The Education and Coffee Week program started on Monday and ends on Friday (26). Saturday (27) will see a closing event for guests still celebrating Black Awareness Day which took place on November 20.

The week was opened last Monday by the municipal secretary of Education of Campinas, José Tadeu Jorge, at the Professor Francisco Ponzio Sobrinho school in Vila Joaquim Inácio. El-Khatib says that through the project, children will carry out projects on the importance of coffee, the origin of coffee culture by Arabs, the history of coffee in Campinas, São Paulo state and from Brazil, coffee in sports, etc.

The project will involve 9,000 students. In addition to the school projects and explanations on the subject by the teachers, the pupils will consume coffee-based products such as coffee cake, coffee brigadeiro, Arabic kofta with coffee sauce, rice in the school lunch. coffee, beef with coffee sauce and banana smoothie with coffee. Cartoons and recreation will also focus on coffee. All these coffee-based products were evaluated and tested in the CEASA-Campinas school food kitchen and presented to the nutritionists involved in the project. The president of CEASA-Campinas, Valter Greve, participated in the launch of the initiative.

Coffee promoter

El-Khatib is a promoter of Arab coffee and culture. He has organized other events on both topics, including Campinas Coffee Festival, Arabic Coffee on the Maria-Fumaça Train, Coffee Run & Walk and Barista Courses, always in coordination with the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). At the launch of Education and Coffee Week, El-Khatib said that the Arab and Brazilian people are united in the cultivation of coffee. Tadeu Jorge also touched on the historical relevance of coffee in Arab countries and in Brazil.

The Education & Coffee program is coordinated by the Education Secretariat of the City of Campinas in partnership with the Jerusalem Institute of Brazil, led by Ali El-Khatib. The partners of the event are SESI, SENAC and the Arab-Brazilian Chamber of Commerce (ABCC); it is supported by the Agronomic Institute of Campinas, CIESP-Campinas, Campinas Convention & Visitors Bureau, CEASA-Campinas and the School of Physical Education of UNICAMP. ABCC President Osmar Chohfi is expected to participate in the closing of the week with other authorities and guests such as Ibrahim Alzeben, Palestinian Ambassador to Brazil.

Translated by Guilherme Miranda

RonconGraça / Supplied

The week of coffee and Arab culture in the schools of Campinas appeared first on Agáncia de Notácias Brasil-árabe.

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Palestinian festival celebrates films about life under Israeli occupation | Arts and culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestinian-festival-celebrates-films-about-life-under-israeli-occupation-arts-and-culture/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 12:29:04 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestinian-festival-celebrates-films-about-life-under-israeli-occupation-arts-and-culture/ Ramallah, Occupied West Bank – The curtains have been raised on the eighth edition of the Palestinian Film Festival, with the final screening of the winning films focusing on life under Israeli occupation and in exile which took place earlier this week in the West Bank city of Ramallah. busy. The Palestine Cinema Days film […]]]>

Ramallah, Occupied West Bank – The curtains have been raised on the eighth edition of the Palestinian Film Festival, with the final screening of the winning films focusing on life under Israeli occupation and in exile which took place earlier this week in the West Bank city of Ramallah. busy.

The Palestine Cinema Days film festival which celebrates Palestinian filmmakers and films focused on Palestine, which have received significant monetary prizes, with the top prize of $ 10,000 being awarded for film production.

A short film, Siri Miri, which means “to and fro” in Arabic, received $ 3,000 and a feature documentary, Little Palestine: Diary of Siege, $ 5,000, in the Sunbird Awards competition.

At least 2,000 people attended over the six-day festival, with screenings in the cities of Ramallah, Jerusalem, Bethlehem, the Gaza Strip and Haifa, where some 60 different independent Arab and international dramas, documentaries and short films were shown. been presented.

Viewers were caught in a whirlwind of emotions; they finished the first – a six-minute short – with laughs, and the second, a documentary, with non-stop tears and an air of devastation.

At least 2,000 people attended over the six-day festival, with screenings in the cities of Ramallah, Jerusalem, Bethlehem, the Gaza Strip and the Israeli city of Haifa [Abbas Momani/AFP]

While presenting two very different aspects of Palestinian reality, the films overlap in the emotions they describe and evoke, of being locked up.

Siri Miri, by 23-year-old director Luay Awwad reflects the dark humor of life under Israeli military occupation.

Two young men, who are struggling to find something to entertain themselves, ask Siri from the iPhone for suggestions. Presented with a list of activities one would normally be able to do, such as “going on a road trip”, the two friends find themselves unable to make any of the suggestions.

“Young people will be able to identify themselves”

It ends with Siri’s suggestion, “go to the beach,” after which viewers are presented with a photo of their car blocked by the Israeli separation wall in Bethlehem. “Siri, baby, we live in Palestine!” One of the young people replies, to which Siri says, “Did you mean Pakistan?” – a response common to many Palestinians, which made viewers laugh.

Awwad, from the small town of Beit Sahour in Bethlehem, said this film shot in Palestine is the first he has ever made, and that he produced it during his second year as a university student. in Bethlehem.

“This film is the closest thing to me; I have suffered from this problem since I was a teenager and started going out in the city. I’m going to be 24 and I’m still suffering from the same problem – when someone really wants to switch off and have fun, there’s nothing they can do, ”Awwad told Al Jazeera.

“I think a lot of young people will be able to relate,” he continued, adding that he did not expect to win. “I think the judges really got to understand how the film comes from a deep place, from the spirit of the youth here.”

Awwad said he hopes to buy his own camera with the $ 3,000 so he can make films. “I feel like the film festival really enjoys supporting young people and emerging people – the award means a lot to me.

The second film screened Wednesday: Little Palestine: Diary of Siege was directed by Palestinian refugee Abdullah Khatib. The documentary tells the painful daily reality during the Syrian government’s siege on the Palestinian refugee camp of Yarmouk in Syria between 2011 and 2015. It tells the story of famine and bombing, and of being doubly displaced, first from Palestine then from Syria.

Support the film industry

Hanna Atallah, artistic director of the film festival, told Al Jazeera that the festival is proud to be able to award such awards to films focused on Palestine.

“We don’t have a local fund for film production, and there are no specialized institutions to support young people who are just starting their journey here, making their first films,” Atallah said. “At least we now have a production award for Palestinian filmmakers in their country. “

The third and largest prize – a production award of $ 10,000 – is intended to help filmmakers get their scripts through filming, post-production and distribution.

The money for the price of the production comes from tickets sold for the Palestine Cinema Days festival, Atallah said.

“Everyone in the audience who bought tickets is a producer in this movie, and it came from the idea of ​​helping each other, cooperating and raising money for someone who has a movie. and wants to produce it, ”he explained.

The winner of the production award, Amman-based filmmaker Dina Naser, said she feels very grateful. “It’s kind of a seed fund for me to be able to finish the movie.”

She told Al Jazeera that the award was particularly moving for her because, like millions of other Palestinian refugees settled in Jordan and stranded by Israel, Naser, 40, was never able to visit her.

“This is an award given by the most important place in my life – Palestine, but which I am forbidden to visit,” Naser said.


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Amira to represent Jordan at the 2022 Oscars | Culture & Society https://therightroadtopeace.com/amira-to-represent-jordan-at-the-2022-oscars-culture-society/ Sat, 13 Nov 2021 09:08:56 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/amira-to-represent-jordan-at-the-2022-oscars-culture-society/ Ammon news – Jordan nominated the narrative feature film “Amira”, by Mohamed Diab, as the official entry for the 94th Academy Awards (Oscar) to compete in the International Feature Film category. Based on the recommendations of an independent committee made up of Jordanian experts involved in the field of writing and the audiovisual scene, the […]]]>

Ammon news – Jordan nominated the narrative feature film “Amira”, by Mohamed Diab, as the official entry for the 94th Academy Awards (Oscar) to compete in the International Feature Film category.

Based on the recommendations of an independent committee made up of Jordanian experts involved in the field of writing and the audiovisual scene, the committee chose this feature film shot entirely in Jordan in 2019 and co-produced by Jordan, the Egypt and Palestine. The nine-member independent committee was formed by the Royal Film Commission – Jordan (RFC), as the country’s official Oscar submission body. The RFC announced last September an open call for nominations for narrative feature films to be nominated for the Oscars, organized the process and compiled the nominations.

The cast includes Jordanian star Saba Mubarak, emerging Jordanian actress Tara Abboud, who plays “Amira”, Jordanian actor Suhaib Nashawan as well as Palestinian actors Ali Suliman, Waleed Zuaiter and Kais Nashif.

While the film was shot in Amman and Salt, the majority of the crew was made up of Jordanians with around 128 people, who worked in the different departments and two local entities were involved in the production.

“Amira” had its world premiere at the 78th Venice International Film Festival where it won the “Lanterna Magica” collateral prize awarded by the jury of Cinecircoli Giovanili Socioculturali (CGS) and the “Enrico Fulchignoni” prize. The film also received a Special Mention at the Carthage Film Festival (JCC) and participated in the El Gouna Film Festival, the Palestine Film Days, the Chicago International Film Festival and the Montpellier Mediterranean Film Festival.

Regarding the selection of the film, a statement from the committee said: “” Amira “is a powerful examination of identity and humanity seen through the eyes of a young girl in search of herself . Mohamed Diab’s masterful directing absorbs the viewer through the nuances of the conflict interior so beautifully portrayed by its incredible cast, principally: Tara Abboud, Saba Mubarak and Ali Suliman. It is a daring film at its best. “

The Academy of Cinema Arts and Sciences will announce the films shortlisted for the 2022 Oscar on December 21, while the nominated films will be announced on February 8 next year. The 94th Academy Awards will take place on March 27, 2022.

With this selection, Jordan had presented, in recent years, a total of six films for the same category: “Captain Abu Raed” by Amin Matalqa, “Cherkess” by Mohyeddin Qandour, “Theeb” by Naji Abu Nowar, “3000 Nights “by Mai Masri,” 200 meters “by Ameen Nayfeh. The Kingdom was last nominated in 2016 for” Theeb “by Naji Abu Nowar. Another Jordanian short -” Baheya and Mahmoud “by Zaid Abu Hamdan – had also made its way into qualifying for the Oscar nomination in 2012.


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How a film festival seeks to improve film culture in Palestine https://therightroadtopeace.com/how-a-film-festival-seeks-to-improve-film-culture-in-palestine/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 11:06:11 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/how-a-film-festival-seeks-to-improve-film-culture-in-palestine/ From fiction and short films to documentaries and real life, the Palestinian Film Days this year presented a rich, diverse and unique selection of Palestinian, Arab and international films. Hundreds of Palestinian, Arab and international actors, directors and artists gathered in Ramallah to mark the 8th Palestinian Film Days festival. Created by the Film Lab […]]]>

From fiction and short films to documentaries and real life, the Palestinian Film Days this year presented a rich, diverse and unique selection of Palestinian, Arab and international films.

Hundreds of Palestinian, Arab and international actors, directors and artists gathered in Ramallah to mark the 8th Palestinian Film Days festival. Created by the Film Lab Palestine Foundation, in partnership with the Ministry of Culture and the Municipality of Ramallah, the festival presented a number of local, Arab and international films, including 11 films which will be screened for the first time around the world. Arab.

The festival opened on November 3 with the premiere of The foreigner, directed by Amir Fakher El-Din from the Golan Heights, a region in southwestern Syria. It is the region’s first feature film and is a co-production of Syria, Palestine, Qatar and Germany. Recently, it was chosen to officially represent the Palestinian Territories in the category of Best Foreign Language Film in competition for the 94th Academy Awards 2022.

The film has been translated into English and includes dialogues in Hebrew. It takes the audience through eight actors and their families residing in the Golan Heights and reports on what happened in the region in 1967, after Israel captured the region, triggering a mass exodus of local residents and the evacuation of towns and villages. .

Director Fakher El-Din said The New Arabic, “I am delighted that my film has been chosen to open such an important cinematic event. I am proud of the Golan Heights and the film is living proof that we are all in the same boat, living under occupation and hoping that ‘one day we will have a state,’ he said.

“It’s a film about each of us… it’s about our fathers, our grandfathers and even the generations to come,” added the director.

“Our partnership with the Palestine Film Days Festival comes from our conviction of the importance of this artistic section by being present on international platforms to consecrate the Palestinian story”

About 65 films from Palestine, Arab countries and other countries including Egypt, Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, Syria, Iran, Malta, Bosnia, Serbia, France, England, America, Denmark and Sweden participated in the festival.

Most Highlighted Movies Included Princess by Egyptian director Mohamed Diab, Son of the Sun from Iranian director Majid Majidi, the historical drama Where, Aïda? by Bosnian director Jazmila Španić, Father by Serbian director Sardan Golbovic, The third war by Italian director Giovanni Aloi, No special place by Italian director Uberto Pasolini, Lozo by Maltese-American director Alex Camilleri, In peace by French director Emmanuelle Bercotte, and concluding its edition on November 8 with the film Ali your voice by Moroccan director Nabil Aayush.

The festival also presented a distinguished group of documentary productions, including President by Danish director Camilla Nilsson, My name is greta by Swedish director Nathan Grossman, Their Algeria by Lina Sweilem, Our memory by Syrian director Rami Farah, An X photo of a family by Iranian director Firouzeh Khosrovani, A room without a view by Rose Corella, and Beautiful things that we left behind by Catherine Philippe.

In cooperation with the Claremont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival, the festival also presented a set of short films, including children’s films. Aiming to build a culture of cinema and its importance to future generations, the festival projected Song of the sea by Irish director Tom Moore, Fahim by French director Pierre François Martin-Laval, and The Moulin Noir by Polish director Mariusz Palij.

Participants arrive for the opening of Palestinian Film Days in Ramallah, West Bank, November 3 [Getty]

“There is no doubt that our partnership with the Palestine Film Days Festival stems from our conviction of the importance of this artistic section by being present on international platforms to consecrate the Palestinian narrative on the one hand, and to know others. stories of peoples who do not go through official cinema or the general public, ”said the mayor of Ramallah Mousa Hadid The new Arabic.

He said the festival intersects with the municipality’s vision of decentralized cultural work. It widens the circle of the public through the historical space of Palestine on the one hand and elevates the network of relations of Palestine to the world through the various programs of the festival.

“We want to create a productive and dynamic film industry in Palestine based on professional and creative filmmakers”

Festival founder and director Hanna Attalah said the festival aims to promote film culture in the Palestinian territories and create a platform that celebrates the emerging talents of Palestinian directors and those in the diaspora. He also wants to support local cinema. He called on all local, Arab and international cultural institutions to unite their efforts to support the cinema sector in the Palestinian territories and help the sector overcome the obstacles it is going through.

On the sidelines of the festival, Film Lab Palestine inaugurates the fourth edition of the Palestinian Filmmakers Forum, where participants exchanged lessons learned from their experiences. The forum was the scene of a series of meetings and workshops specializing in film production, with a focus on how to strengthen the production infrastructure to support a local film industry, especially as the film industry around the world is now trying to overcome the repercussions of the Coronavirus. pandemic.

Hundreds of Palestinian, Arab and international actors, directors and artists gathered for the festival [Getty]

Ola Salama, Executive Director of Film Lab Palestine, said The New Arabic that the festival continues to build on the successes accumulated in previous sessions, noting that the festival stems from the strategic vision of its foundation.

“We aim to enhance film culture in Palestine by providing an ideal space to produce and screen films, exchange experiences, learn, share and inspire. We want to create a productive and vibrant film industry in Palestine based on professional and creative filmmakers. She explained.

Sally Ibrahim is a Palestinian journalist from the New Arab based in the Gaza Strip


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A window on tribal life and culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/a-window-on-tribal-life-and-culture/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 11:12:54 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/a-window-on-tribal-life-and-culture/ A knee-length loincloth tied around their waists and a series of ethnic jewelry covered all of the men’s bodies as they joked with the women. The women responded to the openings in tune with the music of the tapping, and the soft lighting in the background complemented the mood. Draped in saris and heavily adorned […]]]>

A knee-length loincloth tied around their waists and a series of ethnic jewelry covered all of the men’s bodies as they joked with the women. The women responded to the openings in tune with the music of the tapping, and the soft lighting in the background complemented the mood. Draped in saris and heavily adorned with ornaments, the women also returned the favor through subtle smiles and flushed cheeks. In a world almost entirely fueled by transient social media content on apps like Twitter and WhatsApp, the vision seemed almost surreal. What unfolded in front of me, however, was just another depiction of daily life and celebration among the tribes.

The dance performance was part of the second edition of the National Tribal Dance Festival which recently concluded in Raipur, the capital of Chhattisgarh, with the participation of 45 tribal communities. Known as the Dhap dance, it is popular among the tribes of the Sambalpur district in Odisha.

The few hundred participants gathered through their performances presented the various traditions and the myriad of cultures of the ancient inhabitants of the forest.

This in turn has resulted in a unique opportunity for the urban masses and tourists to get acquainted with these traditions which are mostly rooted in pagan customs and nature.

Tribal communities spanning the entire country – from Andaman and Nicobar to Kashmir and from the northeastern states to the far west of Gujarat – presented a visual feast to the audience, filled with remarkable traditional costumes and adornments. Through their performances, the dancers tried to reiterate the similarities and differences in their lifestyles and lifestyle choices.

Many of the performances had themes based on traditional customs like wedding ceremonies and harvesting rituals. One group from Assam, for example, performed the Karbi Tiwa dance while a tribal group from Gujarat performed the endearing Mewasi dance. These two dances are usually part of wedding ceremonies.

Equally captivating were the tribes of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands who dance Nicobari who deepened their relationship with religion and agriculture.

The nomadic Gujjar tribes of Jammu and Kashmir, who reside in airplanes in winter but move to the high altitude areas of Kashmir, have left audiences spellbound with their Gojari dance that they normally hold for weddings and other celebrations. social.

Members of the dance troupes felt delighted to be a part of the event.

Kailash Sisodia, 40, who led a group of 16 dancers from the Bheel tribes of Madhya Pradesh, was proud to have organized the Bheel Bhagoriya dance with members of his team.

Dressed in a yellow turban, blue shirt and white dhoti, these tribes were armed with bows and arrows and swayed to the beat of drums followed by women in traditional golden saris.

“The dance performed during Holi in local markets where young boys and girls participate to brighten up their marriage prospects. We really feel blessed to be here and to present our culture to such a large audience, ”said Sisodia, who is a local BJP leader in addition to being a farmer.

Another team leader, Sumit Kumar Pradhan, 30, led a tribal group of 22 members from Sambalpur to Odisha to perform the Dhap dance.

“During wedding ceremonies, the groom’s friends tease each other about the rules of marriage and that is the point of this dance,” said Pradhan, who had only wrapped a piece of cloth around his waist until knees. The troupe were decked out in local jewelry and heavy makeup.

A member of the Oraon tribe from Ranchi, the capital of Jharkhand, whose group performed the tribal dance called Bandi Oraon, said he was delighted to see the encouraging response from the audience.

“It is a dance that is performed on all occasions, whether it is a wedding or birth ceremony or even a death ceremony. Only our dress, our dance steps and our music change according to the occasion, ”he said, adding that the trip from his village from Ranchi to Raipur is like a dream come true.

The groups competed for a reward of five rupees, three lakhs and two lakhs respectively, according to a press release issued by the administration in charge of managing the event.

The dance forms in the wedding ceremony category included Gour Sing from Chhattisgarh, Karma from Madhya Pradesh, Dhimsa from Andhra Pradesh, Gojari from Jammu and Kashmir, Kadsa from Jharkhand, Guryaballu from Andhra Pradesh, among others. “, did he declare.

“Dance forms under the category of traditional festivals and rituals included Karma from Chhattisgarh, Gussadi Dhimsa from Telangana, Urav from Jharkhand, Sidi Goma from Gujarat,” he added.

Besides 45 tribal groups from 33 States and Union Territories, seven tribal dance teams from countries such as Nigeria, Palestine, Kingdom of Eswatini (Swaziland), Uzbekistan, Mali, Sri Lanka and the Uganda brought an international touch to the whole event.

Thousands of visitors feasted as they watched Indian tribes and tourists shake their legs to the tune of Ugandan folk song Bakisimba.

Robert Musiikuua, 30, who was the leader of the group informed that the Bakisimba is a royal or Ugandan dance that is originally performed in front of the king.

The troupe also staged another popular dance, La Raka Raka, which young men and women in northern Uganda love to perform together.

“We are happy to be here to showcase Uganda’s cultural diversity and heritage. We will promote tourism in our country. This festival brought us together as a nation and a culture, ”said Musiikuua.

“Culture can be used as a tool to create unity, peace and fight against environmental degradation. When we play together, we learn something from each other and take that learning home, ”he added.

Thempekile, team leader of the Eswatini Kingdom dance group (Swaziland), echoed similar expressions as she also felt that performing at the National Tribal Dance Festival was an important cultural achievement for her.

The eight-member team, including two officials, performed the Sibhaca dance, a vigorous war dance popular in Swaziland. “It is performed on all occasions, but mainly on competitive occasions etc.,” said Thempekile, 28.

“It’s memorable to be here in India and to share our culture with others. Everyone appreciated our culture and it was a wonderful feeling, ”she added.

Mohan Dass from Sri Lankan Tamil Tribe Team said being in India was like a home for his team and he was thrilled to have the opportunity to perform some of the best folk dances from his community.

“We are Sri Lankan Tamils ​​and playing in India is always a source of great pride for us,” said Dass.

State administration officials believe that the 2nd edition of the tribal dance event shows its popularity and success as the attendance was much higher than the 1st edition held in 2019.

“In the first edition, there were only 24 states and 6 countries. But the 2nd, which is the first event of its kind in the post-Covid era, saw 33 states and Union territories and seven countries, ”said Chhattisgarh Tourism Secretary Anbalagan P.

He added, “These states and UTs, which do not have tribal populations like Delhi and Chandigarh, were unable to participate. Otherwise, this time we had a pan-Indian response which was quite encouraging. Anbalagan believes that such events will promote foreign tourism in the state.

Speaking about the event, Bhupesh Baghel, Chief Minister of Chhattisgarh, said that such festivals act as a bridge between us and the tribal community and this platform shows that tribes all over the world have something in common with each other. .

“The goal is to make them understand that they are not far from us. They are part of our culture and our tradition. They are as important to us as other companies. That’s why I’m holding him in the state capital, ”Baghel said.

He added, “The tribal people of a particular region feel that they are as much as their own geographic boundaries which are not true. But these kinds of events allow them to realize that tribes exist across the world and that there is a certain similarity in their way of life.


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Challenging Israeli narratives of queer Palestinian culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/challenging-israeli-narratives-of-queer-palestinian-culture/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 21:53:36 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/challenging-israeli-narratives-of-queer-palestinian-culture/ Breathtaking in its extent, Queer cinema for Palestine comes from a worldwide trend to redefine the scale and scale of a film festival. Taking place simultaneously in 12 cities on five continents, the event is anchored in a decentralized philosophy. There is not a single director, president or CEO. Instead, the organizers are as distant […]]]>


Breathtaking in its extent, Queer cinema for Palestine comes from a worldwide trend to redefine the scale and scale of a film festival. Taking place simultaneously in 12 cities on five continents, the event is anchored in a decentralized philosophy. There is not a single director, president or CEO. Instead, the organizers are as distant as they hope their films will travel, united mainly by their support for the Palestinian cause. Queer activists and artists from various cities have been asked to host screenings and in-person discussions, while other events will take place virtually across time zones.

Described as “an exercise in trust” by one of its main organizers, the festival represents an unprecedented number of queer filmmakers from around the world showing works in solidarity with Palestine. The festival is in part a response to the “Brand Israel” campaign that the Israeli government launched in 2005. One of its tenets was to portray Israel as a queer haven and tourist destination while portraying Palestinian society as homophobic and regressive. Activists opposed this, organizing their own gay-themed events and exposing how the Israeli security state has targeted gay Palestinians as a tactic in its prolonged occupation. Their work has attracted the attention of the mainstream media, with over 200 celebrities recently signed an open letter in support of TLVFest in response to criticism.

Ahead of the festival’s inaugural edition, Hyperallergic spoke to two of the organizers, the Toronto filmmaker John Greyson and feminist organizer based in Akka Ghadir Shafie, to learn more about the ambitious project.

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Of Marco (2018), dir. Saleem Haddad, member of the Tunis program

Hyperallergic: How was the Queer Cinema for Palestine born?

John Greyson: Since 2009, there has been a boycott campaign demanded by Palestinian civil society and queer activists in Palestine focused on an Israeli LGBT film festival, the Tel Aviv International LGBT Film Festival (TLVFest), especially because it receives funding from the Israeli government, in particular the Ministry of Strategic Affairs. This is part of a larger Israeli government propaganda effort that seeks to highlight Israel as a so-called “oasis” for gay rights in the Middle East. TLVFest receives this money as part of Israel’s pinkwashing effort to cover up their human rights violations.

In the early years, the campaign encouraged filmmakers to withdraw from TLVFest. Last year, the filmmakers were asked to sign an additional pledge not to submit or screen their work there. Now, we are not only honoring the Palestinians’ call to boycott the festival, but we are also creating an alternative global festival where we can screen the works of those who have retired in previous years and promote dialogue around these issues.

Ghadir Shafiie: In 2016, Aswat [a queer Palestinian feminist collective] spear Kooz, a queer film festival, to give visibility to the diversity of gender and sexuality within Palestinian society and counter Israel’s strategy of portraying us as backward and homophobic, their stereotypical image of queer Palestinians fleeing their family to live in Tel Aviv. We wanted to create this new platform to show stories of LGBTQ + people, and we saw that cinema is a way both to portray reality and to imagine better ones.

Of I have to say i love you (2018), dir. Ariel Nobre, member of the Brasilia program

H: What role does cinema play in the struggle for queer and Palestinian liberation?

GS: It’s a way of describing our stories, it allows people to identify with each other. Here we say, “The staff is political”, and I hope they say it everywhere. I was a Palestinian teenager living in Israel, attending Palestinian schools where Israel dictates the curriculum. I was 18 and had just started to question my sexuality. When I was young I moved to Tel Aviv, where I thought I would live free, but soon my Israeli friends wanted me to change my name to an Israeli name. I realized that there is no “pink door” in apartheid that allows gay Palestinians to escape occupation and oppression. I lived 10 years thinking that I couldn’t be both Palestinian and gay. It wasn’t until I discovered Aswat that I realized that I could be queer, Palestinian, feminist, and female at the same time.

JG: As queer people, we inevitably seek ourselves out on the screen. Especially those who are isolated within the patriarchy do not see themselves in our surroundings, except for what we might see on the screen. These relationships are necessary to create a sense of self and they have the power to fundamentally change society. Maybe I’m predisposed to see it that way as a filmmaker, but it’s hard to think of another art form that has had more of an impact on the way people see us. Portraying queer lives in movies can change opinions, humanize, promote empathy, and lead to debates about how to organize the society we live in. Queer cinema has always helped connect people and dismantle oppressive power structures around the world.

Of Stepmother (2019), dir. Shin Seung Eun, retired from TLVFest 2020, show in Seoul

H: A festival of this magnitude seemed almost unthinkable before the pandemic forced so many people to go virtual. How did you see the festival landscape evolving and how does that fit in?

JG: There is hardly any precedent in terms of a truly global festival. It has never really been done before, the principle of collective curation. Each individual event unfolded in its own direction; it has been an incredible exercise in trust. Kosovo makes Kosovo, Berlin makes Berlin, etc. Each city brings its interpretation of our mandate. It’s the excitement of finding out what we mean by “Queer Cinema for Palestine”. Anyone who attends the festival is going to be surprised – the definitions are very broad and different. QCP was inspired by confinement. As all the festivals started to go live, we realized that we could move forward with this long-held dream of a global festival. But it’s also a natural growth of those years calling on people to retire [from TLVFest]. Now there is an alternative. They will not see films in the context of Israeli apartheid, but in a global space that supports Palestine.

GS: I think the pandemic has allowed the world to reimagine life through the unknown. In a sense, this has ironically been a great way to challenge boundaries. We no longer have the excuse of “we cannot meet in person”. With the presence of online platforms, groups around the world that organize around Palestine can come together. It’s inspiring to see how we can create alternative places. This year we have seen popular uprising in Sheikh Jarrah has spread not only to other parts of Jerusalem, but also to Gaza, the West Bank, Palestinians living in Israel and the Diaspora. This wave of global solidarity was not only inspiring, but actually took us one step closer to freedom. This has allowed us as Palestinians to be creative in our efforts. We have seen queer artists around the world take a stand against apartheid. Israeli uses and abuses cinema to maximize its pinkwashing strategy. It links TLVFest to Israel Pride Month and Eurovision Song Contest. He tries to distract from his crimes by using art and culture. One way to react is not only to boycott, but also to offer alternatives that match the courage that the Palestinians have shown.

Of The white elephant (2018), dir. Shuruq Harb, part of the Beirut / Paris program

H: What do you say to artists grappling with whether to show their work at TLVFest or in Israel?

GS: Artists have a moral obligation to take a stand. I am disappointed by artists who say, “Don’t mix art and politics” because participating in a festival that accepts funding from the Israeli government is a very political statement. TLVFest says it’s the only queer festival in the region, but there are others in Palestine, Tunis, and Beirut.

JG: At the time, I participated in the boycott effort to end apartheid in South Africa. At the time, it was a general boycott until the end of apartheid. In the short term, South African filmmakers and academics suffered, but it was to make changes. Here the Palestinian Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) approaches things in a more nuanced way. It’s not about censorship or targeting of artists or artwork, it’s not about individuals, it’s about funding. It’s not the filmmakers or the films or even the festivals, it’s the money they get from the Israeli government. We are not targeting films or filmmakers; we invite them to join us. Even TLVFest could escape the boycott by denying state funding.

Of Land / Trust (2021), dir. Whess Harman, member of the London, Ontario program

H: Are there any highlights of the program that you think people shouldn’t miss?

JG: I am excited about so many of our programs – Brazil, Paris-Beirut, Seoul. But in particular, the London, Ontario program will bring together Indigenous and Palestinian filmmakers in a dialogue, looking at Palestine through the lens of Indigenous rights. I think it will be really special.

H: What are your goals for the future of this festival?

GS: I think it will only get fatter. I am optimistic because more people are aware of what is happening in Palestine. Something about this generation is different. It’s not that they aren’t afraid – we’ve all been afraid during the pandemic and the popular uprising that followed. But in a way, it gave us all more courage. The more oppressed you are, the more courageous you become to break your chains. I think this year will be a first among many, a queer world cinema for Palestine. I hope this will encourage more Palestinian artists to discuss queer issues in their films as well. Less taboos and more freedom for all of us.

Queer cinema for Palestine takes place November 11-20, with physical events in 12 cities and virtual events available worldwide.

Golden Array by Grimanesa Amoros invites viewers to reflect on connections through “the invisible trajectories of a wireless universe”.


Until now, descriptions of the city have mostly been limited to written accounts of European explorers, according to a new study published in the journal Antiquity.


Acquisitions include works by Michael Menchaca, Groana Melendez, Lucia Hierro, Justin Favela, and more.


Hosted by Carly Whitehead, this year’s series is titled Waht we carry forward and runs until February 28, 2022.



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Jordan and Palestine discuss educational cooperation | Culture & Society https://therightroadtopeace.com/jordan-and-palestine-discuss-educational-cooperation-culture-society/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 10:53:04 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/jordan-and-palestine-discuss-educational-cooperation-culture-society/ Jordan and Palestine discuss educational cooperation [07-11-2021 12:51 PM] Ammon news – Education Minister Wajih Owais on Sunday discussed with his Palestinian counterpart Marwan Awartani ways to further strengthen relations and cooperation between the two countries, mainly in the fields of education. During the meeting, Owais highlighted the ministry’s efforts to prepare a comprehensive education […]]]>

Jordan and Palestine discuss educational cooperation

[07-11-2021 12:51 PM]

Ammon news – Education Minister Wajih Owais on Sunday discussed with his Palestinian counterpart Marwan Awartani ways to further strengthen relations and cooperation between the two countries, mainly in the fields of education.

During the meeting, Owais highlighted the ministry’s efforts to prepare a comprehensive education development plan in line with the goals of the National Human Resources Development Strategy 2016-2025, indicating that the ministry was ready to provide its expertise to the Palestinian side to improve its educational process and activate the joint education committee.

For his part, Awartani said the Palestinian Authority was considering a new plan for the reform and development of education, calling for strengthening cooperation with Jordan to benefit from the Kingdom’s expertise in the areas of the national center of education. development of general secondary programs and examinations.





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Palestine Short Film Festival in Naples – Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestine-short-film-festival-in-naples-culture/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 11:08:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestine-short-film-festival-in-naples-culture/ NAPLES – The Neapolitan stage of the 4th edition of the NAZRA Palestine Short Film Festival begins Wednesday in Naples and ends on November 6 in San Domenico Maggiore. The festival is organized by the Cinema School with the artistic director Sabrian Innocenti and the coordinator Monica Macchi. Admission is free and more information is […]]]>

NAPLES – The Neapolitan stage of the 4th edition of the NAZRA Palestine Short Film Festival begins Wednesday in Naples and ends on November 6 in San Domenico Maggiore.

The festival is organized by the Cinema School with the artistic director Sabrian Innocenti and the coordinator Monica Macchi.

Admission is free and more information is available on the festival website: www.nazrashortfilmfestival.com.

The aim of the festival is to give the public a look at Palestine through the work of young directors who use short films as language to convey topics such as freedom, justice and human rights in the delicate Israeli-Palestinian context.

Morning screenings start at 10 a.m. for two high schools involved in the festival, Elsa Morante High School in Naples and the Adriano Tilgher Institute in Ercolano, which will award the Young Jury Prize.

Public screenings will start at 4.30 p.m., after which discussions will take place with the directors in attendance.

Musical moments will take place on November 3 and 4 with Giuseppe Taranto from the group La Bestia Carenne.

Fourteen short films are in competition in three categories: fiction, documentary and experimental film.

Among the films in competition is “The Present” by Palestinian director Farah Nabulsi, winner of the 2021 BAFTA Award, nominated for an Oscar in the Best Short Film category, and purchased by Netflix for its Palestinian Stories series.

The only Italian film in competition is “Omar” by Luca Taiuti and Marco Mario De Notaris.

On November 5, the festival will organize screenings at Pozzuoli Women’s Prison, where inmates will present the Oltre le Mura (Beyond the Walls) prize.

The festival’s award ceremony will take place on 6 November at 10 a.m. in San Domenico Maggiore, with the screening of the five winning films after a speech by Riccardo Noury, spokesperson for Amnesty International Italy.

The NAZRA Palestine Short Film Festival is an international project coordinated by the Restiamo Umani (Stay Human) association with the VIK Italian Center for Cultural Exchange of Venezia, where the festival opens every year.

In Venice, the annual Vittorio Arrigoni prize is awarded to the film which presents the best solidarity project.

The Neapolitan stage of the festival is sponsored by the city of Naples and Amnesty International, and supported by the Campania region and the Campania Film Commission, in partnership with the Umberto High School Alumni Foundation.


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The 5th El Gouna Film Festival: Beyond Borders – Culture – Al-Ahram Weekly https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-5th-el-gouna-film-festival-beyond-borders-culture-al-ahram-weekly/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 12:45:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-5th-el-gouna-film-festival-beyond-borders-culture-al-ahram-weekly/ At the Fifth El Gouna GFF Film Festival, the Arab premiere of Amira and the Captains of Zaatari was held. Two feature films by Egyptians, respectively Mohamed Diab and Ali El Arabi, they depict the life of Arab characters outside of Egypt – which is unusual for Egyptian cinema. Amira deals with the social and […]]]>

At the Fifth El Gouna GFF Film Festival, the Arab premiere of Amira and the Captains of Zaatari was held. Two feature films by Egyptians, respectively Mohamed Diab and Ali El Arabi, they depict the life of Arab characters outside of Egypt – which is unusual for Egyptian cinema. Amira deals with the social and cultural life of an occupied Palestinian family, while Captains of Zaatari is a documentary about the dreams and aspirations of two football-obsessed boys in a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan. The two are different in terms of perspective and approach from previous films exploring Arab issues.

Amira

For El Arabi, the selection of his first film to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival was a dream come true. Another pleasant surprise was the positive response from the festival audience of different nationalities and origins. “This may be due in part to the fact that the dramatic structure of Captains of Zaatari is close to that of a fictional film,” he says. “There is also the dream, the hope and the friendship that unites the two boys who grow up in front of the public in seven years of filming.” Yet the Middle East premiere at El Gouna, where the film won the Gold Star for Best Documentary, was of a different order. “The El Gouna Film Festival supported the film at a crucial stage. We came to the CineGouna platform in post-production, after an arduous production journey, to present parts of what we filmed, and that’s how we ended up having co-producers. For foreign audiences, the friendship between two teenagers who dreamed of becoming professional footballers was at the heart of the story. For an Arab audience, however, the film had all kinds of political dimensions, even though its writer sought to avoid politics. That’s why El Arabi was concerned about the local response, and that’s why the payoff was doubly satisfying.

“It was a bit risky to make such a film, says El Arabi, because we had to follow the daily life of his characters in the camp for seven years without knowing where it would lead us: will they become professional players, give up and stay in? the camp, or will they return to Syria? All roads lead to my film, but the uncertainty is unpleasant for the producers. This is why Ali decided to take the risk of producing his film with his own sources, and then to look for partners. He feels he did the right thing. “If I could go back in time, I wouldn’t hesitate to make the same decision.

For many years El Arabi worked as a war correspondent for a news channel, during which he directed dozens of television documentaries. “But I had often felt guilty for feeding on the agony of victims of war who are just numbers and statistics for reporting, not human beings who have their hopes and dreams.” After a short time away from the news channels, he decided to tour refugee camps in 22 different countries so as not to be a passive observer. Its aim was to convey the stories of refugees from a closer and more human perspective. This is how he met Mahmoud and Fawzy in Zaatari in 2013. “When Fawzy asked me: ‘How is life outside the camp?’ I felt that to him we were aliens carrying cameras and chasing his life. At this point, El Arabi decided to stay a week or two to film, but the process took six years and 700 hours of footage.

Despite El Arabi’s background as a journalist, the structure and style of Captains of Zaatari is different from that of the news. He set out to free the work from expectations and prejudices, as he had no intention of showing the film in a festival or channel or an interest in persuading producers to support him. “I wasn’t afraid of failure, dissatisfaction or losing money, and my team supported me tremendously. We never interfered with the course of events or directed the characters in any way. We filmed so many recurring events of which we chose the most expressive during the editing phase, and it was quite a challenge. He adds that he has become closer to Mahmoud and Fawzy than to his own brothers, which is reflected in the way they appear on camera. They were more inspiring than others because of the “dream and their friendship”: “I can meet Mahmoud and Fawzy in India, China, Egypt, Tunisia – anywhere. Anyone will feel that they have something in common with their story. At their age, I had a similar experience myself. I dreamed of being world boxing champion in my poor village of Mansourah, and it was seen as madness. This is what he chose to make his fiction debut on. He is writing it.

The film may have cost El Arabi, but what he got from it on a personal and professional level is second to none. “It’s a claim that I can tell the stories I want however I want, and that a documentary can be popular, at least Western audiences have so far, and that it can be successful without a famous producer, director or actor as long as people believe it. This film changed me, it put me on the map as a director and producer. Through this film, I realized that as a generation, we can make films on our own without tutors. ”

For his part, Mohammed Diab’s Amira was presented in preview at the Venice Film Festival, where he received an impressive reception and won three awards. “I saw how Amira’s story pierced the hearts of the audience, who were touched by her journey,” he says. “On the other hand, the critical praise was pretty important to me. Diab was proud to show the film to El Gouna and confident that Egyptian and Palestinian audiences – who mattered most to him – would respond positively to such a “quick, exciting and mysterious” story as it was moving. This is Diab’s third feature film, and it’s the story of a young woman under occupation inspired by the idea – which he and his wife and producer Sahar Johar read years ago – of inmates Palestinians taking their sperm out of Israeli prisons so that their wives can have children in their absence. Working to develop the primse as a team with Johar as well as his brother Khaled and his sister Sherine, Diab imagined “a Greek drama full of existential questions”. That’s why he thinks the film is universal.

El Arabi

Diab thinks it’s risky to make a film about “a world other than yours”. You risk being harshly judged even if you don’t trip. “Our collective decision as a team, from the first moment, was to explore this world through familiar eyes. My dear friend, Palestinian director Hany Abu Assad, my role model, was the first person I turned to, along with his wife, producer Amira Diab. They were our partners in the project, from writing the script to filming. With the exception of directing, cinematography, and editing, the cast and crew were all Palestinian, and they include stars such as Ali Suleiman (who was already on Diab’s mind as he wrote the screenplay), Saba Mubarak, Ziad and Saleh Bakri. He focused on the human side of the Palestinian experience and on the gray reality as opposed to the black and white reality of life, taking the opportunity to explore a world he was unfamiliar with. The spirit of independent cinema in Palestine and the support of Abu Assad opened many doors. Written in Egyptian dialect in collaboration with Abu Assad, the script was then translated into Palestinian dialect, allowing the actors to add their own individual variations.

As for the choice of Tara Abboud in the role of Amira, a bewildered character faced with the question of who we really are, Diab says she was nominated by Saba Mubarak, who played the role of Warda, because she had already worked with her . “When I met Tara at the audition, I was fascinated by her angelic and severe features, as well as her natural talent as an actress. I felt that she was the girl I was looking for. Tara has a special talent. and I expect her to achieve a global position if she continues to cultivate this talent.

* A version of this article is published in the October 28, 2021 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly

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National Tribal Dance Festival: Affirming the Universality of Tribal Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/national-tribal-dance-festival-affirming-the-universality-of-tribal-culture/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 11:49:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/national-tribal-dance-festival-affirming-the-universality-of-tribal-culture/ Tribal dance groups from all over the world have started arriving in Raipur, the capital of Chhattisgarh, for the National Tribal Dance Festival, starting October 28. Preparation for this unique cultural festival has been completed at Science College Ground in Raipur. Chhattisgarh Chief Minister Bhupesh Baghel, who conceived the idea of ​​holding this festival, says […]]]>

Tribal dance groups from all over the world have started arriving in Raipur, the capital of Chhattisgarh, for the National Tribal Dance Festival, starting October 28. Preparation for this unique cultural festival has been completed at Science College Ground in Raipur. Chhattisgarh Chief Minister Bhupesh Baghel, who conceived the idea of ​​holding this festival, says the goal behind this festival is the unity of the global tribal community. Although people speak different languages ​​and have different cultures, the festival affirms the universality of the world’s tribal culture. Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam – the world is one family – is what this tribal unity and the rich aroma of different tribal cultures will establish.

Jharkhand Chief Minister Hemant Soren will be the main guest at the grand opening ceremony, which will be chaired by CM Baghel. KC Venugopal, PL Punia, Adhir Ranjan Choudhary, Dr. Charandas Mahant, chairman of the Chhattisgarh assembly, and others will also adorn the office. On the second day of the program, the Chief Minister of Punjab, S. Charanjeet Singh Channi, will be the main guest. The three-day festival will see performances by tribal dancers from seven foreign countries and the country’s 27 states and six Union Territories. Around 1,000 artists, including 63 foreigners, will perform.

Artists from Uganda, Uttar Pradesh, Palestine, Sikkim and Chhattisgarh will perform in the inaugural program of the National Tribal Dance Festival. The dance troupe from each State and Union territory will perform on two themes: “Vivah Sanskar” and the traditional dance of the States.

Artists from Sri Lanka, Maldives, Uzbekistan, Swaziland, Uganda, Nigeria and Palestine will also perform at the National Tribal Dance Festival. About twenty dance troupes will perform daily. About 3,500 officials were assigned to organize the event.

It will also be an opportunity for people to get acquainted with the costumes, jewelry, crafts, designs and food of the tribes. Besides various tribal dances, it will also offer tribal communities the opportunity to share their experiences in various fields including the arts, music, cinema, health, tourism and food. Thanks to this platform, they will also be able to share their thoughts on developments in their community and their projects. Tribal works will be showcased and people can get detailed information about their arts and crafts. Costumes, jewelry, designs inspired by tribal culture and crafts will be on display. This national festival will also be an opportunity for locals to get acquainted with the local and tribal food and drink of Chhattisgarh.

A senior state government official informed LA WEEK that the National Tribal Dance Festival will enhance mutual cooperation between communities and tribal organizations and explore opportunities to promote rural development, environment and tourism. Tribal artists from 25 states and 6 countries participated in the National Tribal Dance Festival in 2019. But COVID-19 and the restrictions that followed have prevented the festival from being held since then.


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