Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 An Alitalia employee who saved Jews from the 1967 pogrom in Libya – Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/an-alitalia-employee-who-saved-jews-from-the-1967-pogrom-in-libya-culture/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:19:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/an-alitalia-employee-who-saved-jews-from-the-1967-pogrom-in-libya-culture/ (ANSAmed) – ROME, 10 MAG – An unsung Italian story of heroism and solidarity involving the Jews of Libya during the 1967 pogrom returned to center stage on Monday night at an event in the Italian capital dedicated to employees of the flagship carrier Alitalia and their descendants. The occasion was given by the distribution […]]]>

(ANSAmed) – ROME, 10 MAG – An unsung Italian story of heroism and solidarity involving the Jews of Libya during the 1967 pogrom returned to center stage on Monday night at an event in the Italian capital dedicated to employees of the flagship carrier Alitalia and their descendants.

The occasion was given by the distribution of a book entitled “Fermi, non Sparate, Sono Walter! (“Stop, don’t shoot, I’m Walter!”), which details the life of Walter Arbib.

Arbib is a Jew born into a family of Libyan descent who became a successful businessman in Canada and an internationally renowned philanthropist.

The biography, written by journalist Yossi Melman, who for years was editor-in-chief of the Israeli daily Haaretz, tells through Arbib’s life what happened in Libya in 1967 when the Six-Day War began. and that pogroms have been perpetrated. against the country’s Jewish community, which had been in the country for more than 2,000 years.

Editor of the Italian newspaper La Repubblica and host of the event, Maurizio Molinari noted that Italians – with the support of the Italian government and the active interest of the Chief Rabbi of Rome, Elio Toaff – had helped Jews flee a country become hostile.

The heroism of the Italian flag carrier’s employees saved people from Libyan persecution and “represents something that deeply binds Italy to the Jews of the Mediterranean,” Molinari said.

In an emotional speech, Arbib commemorated “the heroes of Alitalia, who at the time showed extraordinary courage and generosity, from managers to company drivers who, despite the risk , continued their work of transporting Jews from their offices to the airport”.

Arbib then named the man who, 55 years ago, saved his life and that of his mother: Renato Tarantino, the former foreman of Alitalia in Tripoli, now missing.

“Helping the Jews was helping people in great difficulty. We took a lot of risks because solidarity came first,” said Umberto Vaccarini, Tarantino’s assistant during the pogroms, on the sidelines of the event.

Vaccarini estimated that some 2,500 Jews were saved.

Dror Eydar, Israel’s ambassador to Italy, pointed to the coincidence between yesterday’s date and the Jewish date of 8 Iyar: when, 102 years ago, the Jews of Jerusalem fell victim to an Arab pogrom in the old Town.

It was April 4, 1920, he noted, and it had begun three weeks after the Balfour Declaration – on a national home for the Jews in Palestine – was inserted into the Sanremo Conference, “the embryo of which, 28 years later became the State of Israel.

The Ambassador noted that “out of all the countries in the world, Italy was chosen to host this event of biblical proportions of the return to Zion, during which the world called upon the Jews to end their long exile and return home to their old homeland”. (ANS Amed).

]]>
After controversies, Georgetown law students call for culture change | https://therightroadtopeace.com/after-controversies-georgetown-law-students-call-for-culture-change/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/after-controversies-georgetown-law-students-call-for-culture-change/ When Nick Rawlinson, a third-year student at Georgetown University Law Center, heard that a poet accused of anti-Semitism would be giving a talk on campus, he grew concerned. Mohammed El-Kurd is a Palestinian activist whose work has revolved around his family’s experience living under occupation in East Jerusalem. But the Anti-Defamation League accused him of […]]]>

When Nick Rawlinson, a third-year student at Georgetown University Law Center, heard that a poet accused of anti-Semitism would be giving a talk on campus, he grew concerned.

Mohammed El-Kurd is a Palestinian activist whose work has revolved around his family’s experience living under occupation in East Jerusalem. But the Anti-Defamation League accused him of having a “disturbing pattern of rhetoric and slander that goes far beyond reasoned criticism of Israel” – an assessment that a group of students who invited El -Kurd on campus called it “baseless.”

Yet the April 26 event involved Rawlinson and other Jewish students, who wrote emails to law school administrators saying El-Kurd should not be allowed to speak. After learning that the event would continue anyway – a manager told students in an email: “Your safety and sense of belonging on this campus and in this community matters to me, and to every member of the school administration” – they felt their feelings had been brushed aside, with little explanation of how officials made their decision.

“Free speech has limits when it comes to incitement and when it comes to violent speech,” Rawlinson said. “It’s a question of safety for the students.

The dispute over El-Kurd’s appearance was the second major campus speech controversy this year, reflecting pressure on administrators nationwide to portray their schools as sites of diverse viewpoints. while ensuring that students feel safe and welcome. In January, a new faculty member was placed on administrative leave for his tweets about President Biden’s pledge to appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court, a move that drew both praise and criticism.

But the students say recent events underscore a culture in which the needs of racial and religious minorities are often ignored. Georgetown Law has been under the microscope since last year, when two instructors were recorded discussing how black students behaved in class – comments that were later called “objectionable” by school management. school. In the months since, student groups have called on authorities to address “deep-rooted” issues after a professor used an anti-Asian slur in class, and Muslim students have accused a professor of longstanding Islamophobia.

Georgetown Law officials acknowledged the series of recent incidents and outlined existing and upcoming initiatives designed to support students, including expansion of the office of equity and inclusion, anti-bias training and inclusive pedagogy workshops for teachers.

“We are focused on how we create a better environment for all of our students and, in particular, those who may not always feel heard or supported, or have not always done so in the past,” Sheila Foster, a professor and inaugural associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion, said in an interview. “We see the potential for significant innovation as a law school that is one of the most diverse in the country.”

Georgetown Law Students for Justice in Palestine, who welcomed El-Kurd to campus, defended the activist and highlighted his place on Time Magazine’s 2021 list of 100 Most Influential People. of his presence on campus, however, revealed broader questions about how students understand anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, and members called on the law school community to “reflect on their biases.”

“The allegations of anti-Semitism made against him are groundless, in bad faith and aimed at silencing the voice of Mohammed,” the group said in a statement. “Mohammed’s record speaks for itself: he is a principled advocate of Palestinian freedom and justice for all.

In a statement, Georgetown officials condemned acts of anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and hatred – while affirming their commitment to “providing a space for the free and open exchange of ideas”, even if those ideas are considered by some to be difficult or objectionable.

“While we affirm that open discourse, discussion and debate are essential elements of university life, we also have core values ​​that clearly oppose bigotry, hatred and racism, and clearly support the assurance that every student is welcomed and respected in our community,” a spokesperson said in an email.

Georgetown has the largest law school in the nation, with nearly 3,000 students enrolled in 2021, according to university data. Last year, 1 in 5 prospective law students nationwide sent applications to Georgetown, resulting in a 41% increase in applications that shocked officials.

Danielle McCoy, a third-year student who transferred from a New York law school to Georgetown in 2020. She said she was drawn to the school’s first criminal defense and prisoner advocacy clinic, as well as by the reputation of the school’s black law student association. — one of the largest and most active in the country.

“Georgetown is a top law school and as a black law student who is all first generation, it’s very important to me to really look at the opportunities that are going to advance my career,” McCoy said. “There are already a lot of obstacles that I have to face.”

Still, she faced more challenges in Georgetown. In March 2021, a video clip went viral showing a conversation between two adjunct faculty members, Sandra Sellers and David Batson. On student performance, Sellers said, “A lot of my lowers are blacks.”

Batson, in a second clip, appeared to question his own unconscious bias. But students, including the BLSA, criticized Batson for failing to condemn Sellers’ comments.

Both teachers apologized. Sellers was fired from her position and Batson resigned.

William Treanor, dean of the law school, condemned the comments at the time, calling the content of the video “odious”. He also announced a series of initiatives, including additional voluntary non-discrimination training for faculty, plans to raise awareness of the school’s bias reporting system and increased funding for a program that supports students. from underrepresented backgrounds.

But the incident left McCoy disgusted.

“Hearing a professor talk about black students like we’re not able to do well and perform well and always at rock bottom is unfortunate,” McCoy said. “I’m already struggling with impostor syndrome.”

She said those feelings resurfaced after Ilya Shapiro, who was to take over as executive director of the law school’s Center for the Constitution in February, apologized for a thread of deleted tweets he wrote after that Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer has announced his intention to step down.

In a tweet, Shapiro suggested that Sri Srinivasan, Chief Justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and the first person of South Asian descent to head a federal circuit court, would be Biden’s top pick. “But alas, this doesn’t fit into the latest intersectionality hierarchy, so we’ll have fewer black women,” Shapiro tweeted, “Thank goodness for the little favors?”

Shapiro has been placed on administrative leave as school officials launch an investigation into whether his remarks violated university policy. He confirmed that he was still on leave.

“I don’t know why it’s taking so long, but I look forward to joining the faculty and standing up for the values ​​of free speech and academic freedom,” Shapiro told The Washington Post.

McCoy said the episode made him feel like little had changed at law school since the Sellers and Batson incident. “I’m just tired,” McCoy said. “Unfortunately, we have to continue to wear this armor and be prepared for all of this.”

In February, the law school addressed another faculty scandal after a professor called a student an anti-Asian slur. The teacher, Franz Werro, apologized for the remark and in a note to his class said that as a non-native English speaker he did not “appreciate that it was a pejorative term “.

In a letter written by the Asia-Pacific Law Students Association – and signed by other student groups – members said the episode was “the latest in a recent series of incidents that suggest a pattern of deeper systemic issues” in law school.

Treanor, in a statement, said students and employees need to take a “serious look” at the school’s culture and processes. “We have important work ahead of us to create a community where students can learn in an environment free of bias, where they are able to foster positive connections with others, and where everyone feels supported and valued for their contributions,” did he declare. written in February.

That month, members of the Muslim Law Students Association began circulating a letter accusing Susan Deller Ross, professor and director of the International Women’s Human Rights Clinic, of “Islamophobic and racist behavior”.

The students allege Ross discriminated against them because of their race and religion, and accused her of teaching “culturally deaf” classes that perpetuate stereotypes about Muslims and Africans. In a collection of anonymous testimonials compiled by MLSA, a student described an incident in which a classmate called Muslims “backward people” and Ross did not offer a correction. Another student said he felt “humiliated” after Ross asked “a white female student to ‘translate’ a technical concept that I was telling her about.”

Ross, through his attorney, has denied the allegations. She is cooperating with an investigation at the university and “looks forward to having these unsubstantiated allegations addressed in a reasoned and rational academic environment, and to having her reputation and her unblemished professional reputation for more than 50 years restored as soon as possible.” , Patricia Payne, who represents Ross, wrote in an email.

The university did not comment on the investigation, but reiterated its commitment to fostering an inclusive campus. “We have policies in place to ensure our classrooms are free of bias and focused on respectful dialogue,” a spokesperson said.

Sophomore and MLSA member Hamsa Fayed helped write the letter after taking Ross’ class last semester. She said she went through official channels to report the professor’s alleged conduct, but the process has now dragged on for more than two months.

“I have no hope in this administration,” she said. “I’m very jaded.”

]]>
May marks the end of the semester and the start of AANHPI Heritage Month | Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/may-marks-the-end-of-the-semester-and-the-start-of-aanhpi-heritage-month-culture/ Thu, 05 May 2022 14:20:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/may-marks-the-end-of-the-semester-and-the-start-of-aanhpi-heritage-month-culture/ May 1 marked the start of this year’s Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. (AANHPIHM). “Asian Americans” includes all US residents who share recent ancestry with a country in Asia. This includes countries in the Middle East, such as Qatar (which will host this year’s World Cup) and Palestine; Central Asia, which […]]]>

May 1 marked the start of this year’s Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

(AANHPIHM).

“Asian Americans” includes all US residents who share recent ancestry with a country in Asia. This includes countries in the Middle East, such as Qatar (which will host this year’s World Cup) and Palestine; Central Asia, which includes countries like Tajikistan and Uzbekistan; East Asia, which includes countries like China, Japan and the Koreas; South Asia, which includes countries like India, Nepal and Pakistan; and Southeast Asia, which includes countries like Vietnam and the Philippines.

“Pacific Islander” represents U.S. residents who share ancestry with people from Polynesian, Melanesian, and Micronesian islands in the Pacific Ocean. Historically, the term has also been used to account for people of Hawaiian descent, who are also celebrated in the AAPIHM; however, there has been a movement to identify Native Hawaiian identity as an ethnicity distinct from “Pacific Islander”.

“As some of the fastest growing racial and ethnic groups in the nation, [Asian Americans] and [Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander] communities represent a multitude of ethnicities, languages ​​and experiences that enrich America and strengthen our Union,” President Joe Biden said.

The AANHPIHM was first celebrated in 1977 when U.S. Representatives Frank Horton [R-N.Y.] and Norman Mineta [D-Calif.] proposed to designate the first 10 days of May as Asia-Pacific Heritage Week. It was later extended to an entire month in 1990 when former President George HW Bush signed a bill legalizing the expansion. Its purpose is to honor and celebrate the accomplishments of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders over the years.

As President Biden has said, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (AANHPI) have long played a vital role in the writing of American history, and recent years have been one of those. an example.

Evidence of this essential influence is the expansion of AANHPI’s representation in the entertainment industry.

In 2021, Riz Ahmed became the first Muslim to be nominated for Best Actor at the Oscars for his performance in “The Sound of Metal” (2019). Although he didn’t win that year, he finally won his first Oscar this year for his work in “The Long Goodbye” (2020). His animated documentary “Flee” (2021), which was named best animated film of 2021 by The Penn, was also nominated in this edition.

Additionally, last year, Chloe Zhao made history as the first woman of color to win Best Director for her work in “Nomadland” (2020). His work in the film also won him the “Best Picture” award; marking the second year in a row that someone of Asian descent has won both awards, like Bong Joon Ho did in 2020 for his work in “Parasite” (2021).

Simu Liu, who last year became the first Asian lead role in a blockbuster Marvel film, believes that this increased representation will teach children that they are capable of achieving anything they hope for, despite the fact that “sectarian” people say otherwise.

“I loved comic books as a kid, I loved superheroes, but I really didn’t see myself represented in that space,” Liu said in an interview. “I really hope that with this movie, kids who are like me, who grew up the same way, can have that.”

“That’s really the power of representation: seeing yourself on screen and feeling like you’re part of that world, which wasn’t always the case for Asian kids growing up in the West,” added Liu.

AANHPI’s impact in the entertainment industry is not limited to movies. This year’s Grammys presented a historic moment for AANHPI in music, as three awards out of four major categories were presented to individuals who identify as part of the AANHPI community.

Grammy veteran Bruno Mars, of Hawaiian and Filipino descent, and his musical partner Anderson Paak, of Korean descent, won Song of the Year and Record of the Year awards for their single “Leave the Door Open” (2020). The song also won two additional Grammys for Best R&B Song and Best R&B Performance.

Additionally, Filipino-American singer Olivia Rodrigo, who topped the charts last year with her hit songs “Driver’s License” (2021) and “Good 4 U” (2021), won the “Best New Artist” award. “. Rodrigo also won Best Pop Solo Performance for his song “Driver’s License” and Best Pop Vocal Album for “Sour” (2021).

Like Liu, Rodrigo expressed how she hopes her presence in the media will inspire AANHPI youth to pursue their dreams.

“I sometimes get DMs from little girls saying, ‘I’ve never seen anyone who looked like me in your position,'” Rodrigo said in an interview. “I feel like I grew up never seeing that. It was always like, [the word] ‘Pop star,’ [always meant] a white girl.”

As AANHPI’s influence becomes increasingly evident in our everyday culture, The Penn wishes all students, faculty, and staff who identify as part of the demographic a Happy AANHPI Heritage Month. ‘AANHPI.

]]>
McConaughey Narrates Texas Wildlife Movie | Arts & Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/mcconaughey-narrates-texas-wildlife-movie-arts-culture/ Wed, 04 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/mcconaughey-narrates-texas-wildlife-movie-arts-culture/ Longview native Matthew McConaughey recounts deep in the heart, a visually stunning film about the wildlife and unique natural features of Texas. The film is written and directed by Ben Masters of Fin and Fur Films and will premiere at 6:45 p.m. Thursday, May 12 at the EarthX Film Festival in Strauss Square in the […]]]>

Longview native Matthew McConaughey recounts deep in the heart, a visually stunning film about the wildlife and unique natural features of Texas. The film is written and directed by Ben Masters of Fin and Fur Films and will premiere at 6:45 p.m. Thursday, May 12 at the EarthX Film Festival in Strauss Square in the Dallas Arts District.

Local screenings begin June 3 at theaters in Grand Prairie, Longview, Tyler and Waxahachie. A special screening was held on June 25 at the Pint and Barrel Drafthouse in Palestine.

The film celebrates what makes Texas unique – its varied landscapes and remarkable wildlife found nowhere else in the world. The story is told through the eyes of wildlife ranging from the mysterious blind catfish to the elusive mountain lion. The story follows our changing relationship with the natural world and the ability of humans to destroy, conserve and recover the wildlife and habitat we mutually depend on.

Two sequences from the film spotlight the Upper East Side of Texas. The crew filmed the alligator gar at the Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area, located in Anderson and Freestone counties. Producer Katy Baldock says the film focuses on the ancient fish’s unique spawning tactics.

“This footage highlights the importance of healthy rivers to ensure alligator gar continue to have floodwaters to spawn,” she says.

Another segment shows the biodiversity in Big Thicket National Preserve, America’s first national reserve and one of the most diverse habitats in the country. The film also highlights the need for forest conservation.

“[We filmed in] Angelina National Forest to showcase the regrowth of forests – particularly the longleaf pine forests – after the majority of the forests were cleared by logging in the early 1900s,” Baldock says.

The family-friendly film features cutting-edge cinematography on a journey from the peaks of the Guadalupe Mountains in West Texas through the state’s aquifers, rivers and bays, and deep into the Gulf of Mexico. deep in the heart aims to conserve our remaining wild places, show water and wildlife connectivity, and recognize Texas’ conservation importance on a continental scale.

Director and screenwriter, Ben Masters is a filmmaker and writer specializing in wildlife and adventure stories. He made a documentary titled The river and the wall in 2019 and produced Unbranded in 2015. Masters studied wildlife biology at Texas A&M University and founded Fin and Fur Films in 2015. He is the author of two books published by Texas A&M University Press and has written for National geographic and western rider.

Baldock is producing the film with Jay Kleberg. Skip Hobbie is directing photography and the film’s editor is Sam Klatt. deep in the heart features original music by Noah Sorota. For more information, visit www.deepintheheartwildlife.com.

]]>
Nothing Can Undermine the Palestinian Question: An Iranian Cleric – Society/Culture News https://therightroadtopeace.com/nothing-can-undermine-the-palestinian-question-an-iranian-cleric-society-culture-news/ Tue, 03 May 2022 09:13:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/nothing-can-undermine-the-palestinian-question-an-iranian-cleric-society-culture-news/ Ramadan this year, like last year, coincided with a new wave of Israeli aggression against Palestinians, which infuriated Muslims around the world, prompting them to attend mass protests to condemn the regime’s atrocities. Israeli against the Palestinians. Ayatollah Seddiqi, noted in his sermon that this year’s International Quds Day saw massive anti-Israel protests across the […]]]>

Ramadan this year, like last year, coincided with a new wave of Israeli aggression against Palestinians, which infuriated Muslims around the world, prompting them to attend mass protests to condemn the regime’s atrocities. Israeli against the Palestinians.

Ayatollah Seddiqi, noted in his sermon that this year’s International Quds Day saw massive anti-Israel protests across the Muslim world.

The protesters “showed that nothing can diminish the Palestinian issue and that al-Quds and Palestine are alive”, he said.

He said young Palestinians are sacrificing their lives to defend their homeland against the Israeli occupation regime.

“The Zionists, who had an aggressive attitude, are now terrified and anxious and they have an exhausted army,” he said.

“Their faces reveal that they have reached the end of the line and that the Palestinian youth, with their courageous resistance operations from Jenin to Haifa and Tel Aviv, have put Israel in a totally isolated and defensive state.”

The solution to the suffering of the Palestinian people and the key to victory, he continued, is to continue to resist and to insist on “confronting and breaking the horn of the usurper”.

Elsewhere in his sermon, the senior religious leader referenced the Afghan crisis, saying the innocent Afghan people have fallen victim to waves of hatred from the United States and Israel.

“We urge the governing body of Afghanistan to ensure the safety of all Afghan people, identify and punish terrorist networks and bring peace to the Afghan people,” he said. he adds.

Ayatollah Seddiqi also criticized so-called human rights defenders for keeping silent about the suffering of the Afghan people while making a big deal out of Ukraine.

Afghanistan has been in turmoil since the Taliban, who ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001, regained power on August 15 last year amid a chaotic withdrawal of US troops from the war-torn country .

The country has been the scene of recurring terrorist attacks, some of which have been claimed by the terrorist group Daesh (ISIL or ISIS).

In recent weeks, the latest wave of deadly attacks across the country has claimed the lives of dozens of civilians.

]]>
La Culture Couture returns in person after two years | Campus News https://therightroadtopeace.com/la-culture-couture-returns-in-person-after-two-years-campus-news/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:15:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/la-culture-couture-returns-in-person-after-two-years-campus-news/ Culture Couture returned in person for the first time in two years to the Becker Amphitheater on April 28. Hosted by the Association for Intercultural Awareness, the multicultural event highlights the diverse history and traditions of Cal State Fullerton’s cultural clubs and organizations. “This is just an opportunity for all organizations to come out and […]]]>

Culture Couture returned in person for the first time in two years to the Becker Amphitheater on April 28. Hosted by the Association for Intercultural Awareness, the multicultural event highlights the diverse history and traditions of Cal State Fullerton’s cultural clubs and organizations.

“This is just an opportunity for all organizations to come out and show students their mission statements and how much they value their culture, and try to exemplify the diversity here on campus,” said Isabella Galvan, president of the association.

Galvan said she wanted the event to feel like the students were traveling the world. Several organizations, including the Lebanese Students Association, the Philippine Business Association, Students for Justice in Palestine, and the Japanese Anime Club, were on hand to raise awareness and educate students about their cultures.

“I think what’s really cool is seeing how these organizations have flourished over time,” said Maysem Awadalla, the association’s events coordinator and second-year political science student. “(The association) is the fundraising council for cultural clubs and so to see them come to life with all that we’ve funded for them is really rewarding I think, because you see them there for it, you see them wanting to do it. , and then you watch it all unfold.

The event also included great performances from CSUF’s Ballet Folklorico, Long Beach’s Mahana Dance Company and a Dabke group from Los Angeles’ Sa’id Music and Dance Company.

Dancers from CSUF’s Ballet Folklorico, Odalys Garcia and Arnold Garcia, took the stage and performed the regional Mexican dance of Chihuahua. Influenced by polka music and Eastern European customs, the Chihuahua is a couple dance that showcases the wardrobe and footwork of its dancers.

“The wardrobe in this state is a much shorter skirt so you can really focus on the footwork that’s going on,” said Jennifer Uribe, president of CSUF’s Ballet Folklorico.

Uribe said she wants students to understand that Folklorico is more than just women in big dresses.

“We’re more about history and understanding than it’s a representation of our culture and how we can express who we are and where we come from,” Uribe said.

From the islands of Tahiti, members of the Mahana Dance Company performed a Tahitian dance that showed the beauty of Polynesian culture. Five students were encouraged to take the stage at the end of the show to learn some quick Tahitian dance moves as the audience cheered them on.

Galvan said the arrival of the Mahana Dance Company was significant for CSUF students who felt there was not enough Pacific Islander representation on campus.

“I brought them because a lot of people have expressed that there isn’t enough Pacific Islander representation, and while we don’t have a specific Polynesian group here on campus that I’m aware of, I would love to embrace all cultures as much as I can,” Galvan said.

Finally, from the southwestern region of North Africa, the Sa’id Music and Dance Company returned to CSUF after 25 years. The company performed a traditional Dabke dance which completed the whole event.

Dabke is a Levantine folk dance that originated in villages in Middle Eastern countries. Villagers gathered to help seal the cracks in the mud roofs. The process of forming a line and joining hands while stomping through the mud eventually became a dance to unite communities and celebrate with each other. The performance was so well received that several students ran onto the stage and joined in the dance towards the end.

Sa’id Judeh, founder of Sa’id Music and Dance Company, expressed his gratitude that CSUF continues to be a school that celebrates diverse cultures.

“The good thing about this school is intercultural, it’s that you get to know all cultures. I’m from Palestine and my dance company is from all over the world,” said Judeh “The idea is that music and dance is the only language that everyone understands, and we hope that we will all live in peace.”

]]>
Palestinian culture of seeking martyrdom Reason for Zionists’ failure: Hamas official https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestinian-culture-of-seeking-martyrdom-reason-for-zionists-failure-hamas-official/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 12:01:25 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/palestinian-culture-of-seeking-martyrdom-reason-for-zionists-failure-hamas-official/ TEHRAN (IQNA) — A senior Hamas official has pointed out that the Zionists’ failure is due to the culture of seeking martyrdom among Palestinian fighters. Addressing the International Quds Day rally in Tehran on Friday, Khalil al-Hayya, a member of Hamas’ political bureau and deputy head of the Gaza Strip, said the culture of seeking […]]]>

TEHRAN (IQNA) — A senior Hamas official has pointed out that the Zionists’ failure is due to the culture of seeking martyrdom among Palestinian fighters.

Addressing the International Quds Day rally in Tehran on Friday, Khalil al-Hayya, a member of Hamas’ political bureau and deputy head of the Gaza Strip, said the culture of seeking martyrdom was growing stronger day by day. among Palestinian resistance fighters.

He criticized those who seek concessions with the Zionist regime and said the Palestinian resistance defeated the regime and shattered the illusion of its invincibility.

Hayya added that the Palestinian nation will not allow the Zionist regime to carry out its plans to Judaize the holy city of Al-Quds.

He also praised the support of the Iranian people and the establishment for the cause of Palestine and Al-Quds.

Iranians held rallies on Friday, International Quds Day, to condemn the Zionist regime’s crimes and stress support for the Palestinian resistance against Israel until the liberation of Al-Quds.

Protests began at 10 a.m. in Tehran and 900 other cities and towns across the country.

Senior political and military officials, including President Seyed Ebrahim Raeisi, Speaker of Parliament Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf and Iranian Armed Forces Chief of Staff Major General Mohammad Hossein Bagheri also attended the rally in Tehran.

International Quds Day is a legacy of the late founder of the Islamic Republic, Imam Khomeini, who designated the day in solidarity with the Palestinians.

Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran, International Quds Day has been observed around the world on the last Friday of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

4053507

]]>
Mainstream media against resuuuuurch culture., by bluediamond | Surfing Forums https://therightroadtopeace.com/mainstream-media-against-resuuuuurch-culture-by-bluediamond-surfing-forums/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 08:34:26 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/mainstream-media-against-resuuuuurch-culture-by-bluediamond-surfing-forums/ “Monbiot never wrote a column about the worst attack on press freedom in a generation: the political persecution of Julian Assange. Soil erosion, he said, took precedence. Now, it prioritizes a witch hunt against left-wing heretics in Ukraine over the freedom of Assange.This is pure fraud. What is amazing is that Monbiot accuses people like […]]]>

“Monbiot never wrote a column about the worst attack on press freedom in a generation: the political persecution of Julian Assange. Soil erosion, he said, took precedence. Now, it prioritizes a witch hunt against left-wing heretics in Ukraine over the freedom of Assange.This is pure fraud.

What is amazing is that Monbiot accuses people like John Pilger of being Putin apologists not by refuting Pilger’s facts (which are documented) but by claiming that Putin said similar things. As if the truth becomes false as soon as it serves Putin’s interests.

Despite a headline claiming that the “anti-imperialist left” is amplifying Russian propaganda, Monbiot is simply throwing mud. Apparently, he doesn’t need to cite rebuttal evidence. He suggests that all critics of NATO or US foreign policy are heretics by definition.

Additionally, Monbiot rekindles a black propaganda talking point at the CIA. Pilger is discredited not because his facts are wrong – after all, they are well documented, including by senior US officials – but because the wrong people shared them on the net. It’s a puerile argument.

This dirty tactic is popular with the Israel lobby. Write an article exposing horrible facts about Israel and they’ll scour the net until they find a neo-Nazi site that reposts it. Then they don’t need to address the facts. The truth becomes a lie simply because it also serves the neo-Nazis.

There’s a reason Monbiot attacks the last of the old school foreign correspondents – Pilger, the late Robert Fisk and Seymour Hersh. They saw with their own eyes how “our” elites controlled the media to brainwash the public in order to maintain their power. Bravely, they said it directly.

Monbiot, on the other hand, falls far short of his depth on anything he can’t skim through his fingers. Listen to it on the environment. Otherwise, treat everything he has to say with the disdain he deserves.

I challenged Monbiot every time he wrote this kind of poison. He dodges a confrontation with those he insults: Chomsky, Pilger, Fisk (now dead), and others. He knows they would take him to the cleaners.” – Jonathan Cook

Learn more about Monbiot: https://www.jonathan-cook.net/blog/tag/george-monbiot/?fbclid=IwAR1EI5Y0…

]]>
Celebrating the contribution of Arab-American artists to culture – Eurasia Review https://therightroadtopeace.com/celebrating-the-contribution-of-arab-american-artists-to-culture-eurasia-review/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 23:00:57 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/celebrating-the-contribution-of-arab-american-artists-to-culture-eurasia-review/ By Rawaa Talas On April 1, US President Joe Biden released an open letter extending his “warmest greetings” to the Arab-American community in honor of Arab-American Heritage Month. Such a gesture was welcomed by many, including Lebanese-American artist Zughaib, who emigrated from Lebanon to the United States during the civil war. “Finally, you feel proud […]]]>

By Rawaa Talas

On April 1, US President Joe Biden released an open letter extending his “warmest greetings” to the Arab-American community in honor of Arab-American Heritage Month. Such a gesture was welcomed by many, including Lebanese-American artist Zughaib, who emigrated from Lebanon to the United States during the civil war.

“Finally, you feel proud and hopeful,” Zughaib told Arab News. She was commissioned by cosmetics giant Sephora to create a new piece of artwork for its social media platforms celebrating the special occasion. The result is this cheerful and colorful image of dabke dancers and musicians. Zughaib’s work is about finding beauty and hope in stories of personal and collective trauma. “I have a very strong desire to do something appetizing that can catch your eye,” she explained.

Rania Matar

Lebanese photographer Matar has lived in the United States since 1984. Her intimate images explore themes related to adolescence and femininity, capturing young women reclining in the privacy of their bedrooms or immersed in nature. In Matar’s ongoing series “Where Am I Going? the viewer is confronted with women photographed in abandoned spaces in Beirut, like this image of a theatergoer named Rhea, seated inside the old Piccadilly theatre. “I saw graffiti on the wall that said in Arabic, ‘Where am I going?’ These women are at this crossroads. Where are they going? I was their age when I left Lebanon. Some leave; others cannot afford to go anywhere. I want to empower them and tell their story,” Matar wrote in a statement.

SHERIN GUIRGUIS

The works of Los Angeles-based Egyptian artist Guirguis are inspired by forgotten stories of marginalized communities, especially women. This work, “Here I Came Back,” was a site-specific sculpture created for an exhibition at the Pyramid Plateau in Giza, Egypt, last year. It is shaped like a sacred musical instrument played by Hathor, the ancient goddess of music and dance. Adorned with pharaonic symbols, the sculpture also pays homage to the revolutionary 20th-century Egyptian feminist, Doria Shafik, whose writings are featured. “Serving both as a memory of history and an invitation to connect these narratives to the present, the work aims to make visible once again the invisible work of generations of under-recognized women,” Gurguis said in a statement.

JOHN HALAKA

Halaka, born in Egypt, is the son of Palestinian and Lebanese immigrants who came to America in 1970. “Until the COVID pandemic, I traveled to Palestine almost every year to work on various projects,” said he told Arab News. In her evocative series, “Ghost of Presence/Bodies of Absence,” Halaka addresses the plight of exiled Palestinians by placing ink and stamped text, sometimes appearing in the form of a human face, over digital photographs of villages destroyed, creating a ghostly and imitating effect, Halaka said, “the incessant tension between the physical absence of Palestinians who have been exiled from their homeland and the psychological presence of millions of Palestinian refugees who continue the struggle to return to the lands that were stolen from them.”

JACQUELINE REEM SALLOUM

As a first-generation Arab-American, Salloum has devoted much of her time to challenging Arab stereotypes in Hollywood. But recently, the Syrian-Palestinian artist has been experimenting with lively and detailed collages, juxtaposing historic black and white photos with vibrant drawings. “My current work further explores the connections between personal, collective past, heritage and history through diasporic memory,” she told Arab News. “Remembering the Future”, this multimedia work, merges the personal story of Sumaya Yousef, a displaced Palestinian woman, and key events that took place in the 1960s, including the 1967 Arab-Israeli war and the World Expo in 1964-65 – based on the theme of “Peace Through Understanding” – in New York, Yousef’s future home. Salloum brings out the contradiction and irony of such events: spectators peering into a utopian bubble of Palestinian refugee girls at school, the voice of Umm Kulthum drowning out the noise of Israeli warplanes.

JORDAN NASSAR

Inspired by Palestinian embroidery and working with Arab artisans, Nassar, a Palestinian-born artist born in New York, is known for creating patterned and vibrant pieces that reveal imaginary landscapes of Palestinian lands. “I was talking to some Palestinians who had never been there, I noticed that they were talking about Palestine in a way that seemed really dreamlike – imaginary; a fantasy,” he previously told Arab News. “It was always this perfect, beautiful place with hills and goats and olive trees. I was really moved by this idea that Palestine is a fantasy for so many people in the diaspora. In this work, “Beyond the Boundaries”, Nassar revisits his recurring motif of the hills.

JACKIE MILAD

“I view my plays as a record of my decisions over time, a document of my story — my story to me,” Baltimore-based Milad, who is of Egyptian and Honduran descent, told Arab News. Works like this, “Nada Que Decir” (Nothing to Say) from 2021, are full of colors, words and symbols. “This work is an accumulation of multiple layers of collage and painted marks over two years,” she explained. “It includes world news and quotes from lyrics and poetry. I also mix languages ​​in the works, reflecting my upbringing. The title of the book is ironic; the artist expresses a lot of emotion, but has nothing to say in the face of the complexities of identity.

SAMA ALSHAIBI

A woman in a white dress carries a large water container above her head, while another woman in black carries eight vertically stacked pots. These are two of the powerful shots of Iraqi-born photographer Alshaibi, who said in a statement that she was interested in “the societal impact of unequal power relations between the West and the Middle East, and the the way in which this domination is articulated through the photographs”. Alshaibi’s “Carry Over” series recalls how Orientalist photographers portrayed women as “exotic” beings. “I aim to amplify the physical burden of their unfair portrayal by exaggerating the items (they) were carrying,” Alshaibi added.

]]>
Celebrate the contribution of Arab-American artists to culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/celebrate-the-contribution-of-arab-american-artists-to-culture/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 07:02:17 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/celebrate-the-contribution-of-arab-american-artists-to-culture/ HELSINKI: Two years after being forced to close due to pandemic restrictions, Helsinki’s Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art has reopened in Finland’s capital with a newly renovated interior and a sprawling exhibition that takes up all five floors of the building. “ARS22 — Living Encounters” brings together contemporary visual arts, performances and films from local […]]]>

HELSINKI: Two years after being forced to close due to pandemic restrictions, Helsinki’s Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art has reopened in Finland’s capital with a newly renovated interior and a sprawling exhibition that takes up all five floors of the building.

“ARS22 — Living Encounters” brings together contemporary visual arts, performances and films from local and international artists in a large-scale exhibition that will run until October 16, 2022.

ARS, a series of major international exhibitions of contemporary art, was first conceived in 1961 and held at the Ateneum museum in Helsinki. ARS22 is the 14th exhibition in the series and the 10th to be held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma. In total, the exhibitions welcomed more than one million visitors and featured works by around 600 artists or groups.

Since its opening 61 years ago, the gallery has addressed major issues around the world, and this year’s edition continues the tradition.

In addition to the 15 commissions produced exclusively for the exhibition, works by 55 artists from 26 countries, including Iraq, the United Arab Emirates, Australia and Mexico, explore the exhibition’s themes of coexistence, our relationship with the world and the challenges facing the planet and humanity. .

Michael Rakowitz, “The Ballad of Special Ops Cody” (2017). Provided

“The idea behind ARS22 was to build an entity where multiple voices would coexist together. To create a museum as a platform for encounters, we curated an exhibition where many stories, instead of a linear storyline, would exist,” said said Piia Oksanen, who curated the exhibit alongside museum director Leevi Haapala, chief exhibit curator Joao Laia, and a team including her twin sister Satu Oksanen, Saara Hacklin, Kati Kivinen, Patrik Nyberg, Jonna Strandberg and Jari -Pekka Vanhala.

“That’s why invitations were sent out to artists from different backgrounds, from different geographies, working with a variety of media,” she said.

According to Oksanen, “there is a growing interest in artists from the Arab world”.

Several artists from the Middle East have been invited to participate in ARS22, including Kholod Hawash, a self-taught textile artist from Iraq; Farah Al-Qasimi, an Emirati visual artist; Michael Rakowitz, an Iraqi-American multidisciplinary artist; and Slavs and Tatars, a collective of anonymous artists founded in 2006 by a Polish-Iranian duo.

Al-Qasimi told Arab News that “it’s always great to be able to show your work in new environments. The show-investigations are fascinating for the dialogues they offer between artists who work in different ways.

The Abu Dhabi-born artist is known for her color-saturated photographs, many of which are displayed on the second floor of the museum.

Farah Al-Qasimi, ‘Khaleeji Dance’ (2020). Provided

Al-Qasimi’s artwork, which features images of a woman watching an anime on her iPhone, butterflies sitting on a slice of orange and an injured falcon being treated in a hospital, was brought to the exhibition by chief curator Laia, who invited the artist for a studio visit while she was in quarantine last November.

“You have to attend the works one by one,” Al-Qasimi said.

NADA Artadia Prize winner is known for her seductive portraits illustrating materialism and gender relations in the United Arab Emirates.

“The work in the exhibition is part of my research into ideas of paradise in contemporary culture; specifically, in religion and in the leisure and entertainment industries,” she said.

“There are references to the little ways people try to embody their own versions of idealism in everyday life, through shopping, nature or worship. It’s joyful, but also a little critical at times.

The second floor of the museum also exhibits works of the Slavic and Tatar art collective.

This year’s edition of the exhibition is the first to include works from previous exhibitions.

“We are delighted that our work will be included in the first iteration to include works from decades past, given that Slaves and Tatars was designed, in part, to counter the amnesiac focus on the new, the present, the current “, the artists mentioned.

The group installed a carpeted seating area that is a cross between a rahle, a reading desk for religious texts, and the takht, a space to sit and converse in traditional teahouses. Titled ‘PrayWay’, the installation also references flying carpets from Middle Eastern fairy tales such as ‘Aladdin’ and an example of the group’s interactive work – a space to sit, chat and connect with others .

Slavs and Tatars, “Mother tongues and paternal throats” (2012). Provided

Next to the silk and wool rug is a five-meter-high hanging rug titled “Mother Tongues, Father Throats” which depicts a diagram of the mouth showing which parts are responsible for pronouncing the letters of the Arabic alphabet. In the middle (the throat), the artists have added the Hebrew and Cyrillic equivalents of the Arabic “kha” and “qaf”, which are not present in the Western language, and mark a clear boundary between East and West.

“We are interested in redeeming the other organs of language, be it the throat or the nose, often overshadowed by the tongue,” the art collective said. “Alphabets are eminently political vehicles. We tend to imagine them innocent, but Latin, Cyrillic and Arabic each accompanied the imperial projects.

Meanwhile, two floors above hang colorful patchwork quilts by Hawash, born in Basra, now based in Helsinki and known for her hand-sewn textile pieces using a traditional Iraqi technique.

The artist taught herself to sew after watching her mother make patchwork quilts by hand-sewing scraps of discarded fabric.

According to Hawash, sanctions against Iraq at the time meant that textiles and fabrics were in short supply, so Iraqis had to use old clothes and materials taken from home to sew their “jodaleia”, the Arabic term designating traditional handmade Iraqi quilts.

Three of his outstanding works occupy the fourth floor of the museum.

Kholod Hawash, ‘Wild Song’ (2021). Provided

Hawash and her husband, Saddam Jumaily, an Iraqi painter and sculptor, sought refuge in Amman from persecution before settling in Finland with the help of Artists at Risk. Exiled artists were the first residents of AR-ICORN Safe Haven Helsinki.

“I’ve been threatened multiple times for not wearing a hijab,” Hawash said, standing next to a quilt depicting a woman cutting her hair.

“In our culture, many women cut their hair as a form of resistance and a way to distance themselves from the ‘weaker sex’,” she said.

In addition to being beautiful, Hawash’s textiles deal with political decadence, social and economic justice, refugee and migration issues, religious freedom, and other humanitarian issues.

She also draws inspiration from Iraqi folklore, with figures of goats, fish, birds and horses featuring in her embroidered work.

“It’s relevant to look outside the western world and recognize how intertwined histories and current concerns are,” Oksanen said of the decision to include artists and works from the Middle East in the series. exposure.

Indeed, there is an endless supply of sophisticated and thought-provoking works from the Arab world and it is time dedicated spaces were made available to them.

]]>