Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 14:19:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://therightroadtopeace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2.png Palestine culture – The Right Road To Peace http://therightroadtopeace.com/ 32 32 Highlighting Palestinian Culture, Despite Israeli Restrictions | Israelo-Palestinian conflict https://therightroadtopeace.com/highlighting-palestinian-culture-despite-israeli-restrictions-israelo-palestinian-conflict/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 14:19:48 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/highlighting-palestinian-culture-despite-israeli-restrictions-israelo-palestinian-conflict/ Occupied East Jerusalem – For 29-year-old Palestinian cartoonist Azeez Azeez, the Yabous cultural festival in Jerusalem was an opportunity to present his work, for the first time, in an art exhibition. Unlike his art, which is often political and painfully brutal, Azeez is a light and youthful character. “Today, we don’t need to imagine much […]]]>

Occupied East Jerusalem – For 29-year-old Palestinian cartoonist Azeez Azeez, the Yabous cultural festival in Jerusalem was an opportunity to present his work, for the first time, in an art exhibition.

Unlike his art, which is often political and painfully brutal, Azeez is a light and youthful character.

“Today, we don’t need to imagine much to produce an image that depicts the high contrast of the struggle on the pitch,” Azeez told Al Jazeera during the exhibit.

Showing his two hanging artworks of Palestinian children confronting the Israeli army, he said: “You can just look at the news and literally transfer it – as it is – and these are the results.

“They’re not radical – they’re very direct and clear,” Azeez added.

The Yabous Cultural Center held the 19th edition of its week-long cultural festival earlier this month, this year titled “Stand Up Jerusalem!” The event ran from September 16-21 and included an art exhibition, plays, music and dance performances, comedy and workshops.

Located on Az-Zahra Street, a five-minute walk from Jerusalem’s Old City, the center’s largest venue was packed to capacity every night, with around 2,000 to 2,500 people in total attending.

Rania Elias, the centre’s director, donned a colorful kaftan printed with Arabic calligraphy on the festival’s opening night.

“Joy is not an easy thing in Jerusalem,” Elias explained on stage, emphasizing “the importance of the relationship between culture and liberating thought.”

“The difficulties of staying, persevering and carrying on, in light of difficult political, financial and funding conditions, have become incapacitating.”

This is where Yabous comes in, continues Elias, with his work “to preserve national identity”.

“We see our cultural projects as a tool in the struggle against the ongoing cultural eradication that is being waged against our institutions and the Palestinian people,” she added.

Azeez Azeez, 29, standing next to the left of two of his artworks at the Yabous festival in occupied East Jerusalem [Eyad Tawil/Al Jazeera]

“Arise Jerusalem”

The audience cheered and cheered throughout the opening performance of locally revered singer and producer Dalal Abu Amneh, 39, from Nazareth, which is located in Israel but whose inhabitants are Palestinians.

Abu Amneh began with his own Palestinian songs, singing his love for his country, and ended with favorites from the wider Arab world.

Bassem Shraydeh, a 73-year-old chemistry professor at an-Najah University in Nablus, who attended the show with his family, was a fan of the show.

“Dalal Abu Amneh is well known; she is the pinnacle of singing and originality. She is much loved,” he told Al Jazeera after the event.

In the days following Abu Amneh’s concert, the festival, held since 1996, included performances by world-renowned Palestinian electronic music group 47Soul, a Palestinian folk dance group dabke, stand-up comedy, a play and an orchestra bringing together more than 80 musicians from all over historic Palestine.

But the cultural scene cannot escape the reality of the Israeli occupation.

In July 2020, Israeli forces attacked the Yabous Cultural Center, the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music and the Shafaq Cultural Network in occupied East Jerusalem, over allegations of “money laundering, terrorist financing and tax evasion”.

The offices of the three organizations were ransacked and their documents, electronic devices including laptops and phones were confiscated.

The directors, including Elias and her husband Suhail Khoury, who runs the Conservatory, were arrested at their homes and released 12 hours later.

“They [Israeli authorities] always target us on a personal level and as an institution,” Elias told Al Jazeera.

Yabus
The opening night featured Palestinian singer Dalal Abu Amneh of Nazareth [Zena Al Tahhan/Al Jazeera]

Restricting the lives of Palestinians in Jerusalem

Israeli authorities have for decades restricted Palestinian civil society institutions in occupied East Jerusalem.

The eastern half of Jerusalem was militarily occupied by Israel in 1967 and illegally annexed. There are currently 350,000 Palestinians in Jerusalem, including at least 220,000 Israeli settlers living in illegal settlements.

Some 86% of occupied East Jerusalem is under the direct control of the Israeli government and settlers. Local NGOs and rights groups have long pointed to a series of Israeli practices and policies in Jerusalem aimed at changing the demographic ratio in favor of Jews, a goal defined as “maintaining a solid Jewish majority in the city” in recent municipal master plans.

Dozens of Palestinian institutions and hundreds of events since the early 2000s in occupied East Jerusalem have been arbitrarily ordered to close by Israeli authorities on the grounds of ‘ties to the Palestinian Authority‘ or ‘to Hamas’ , the group that administers the blockade of Gaza. Undress.

According to the Jerusalem-based Civic Coalition for Palestinian Rights (CCPRJ), since 2001, Israeli authorities have temporarily or permanently closed at least 35 public institutions and Palestinian NGOs in occupied East Jerusalem.

In May 2017, authorities banned a lecture on Al-Aqsa Mosque at the Yabous Cultural Center. Israeli police and intelligence services arrived an hour before the scheduled start of the conference – which aimed to raise questions about Jordanian custody of the holy site – and ordered it closed, saying it had been “organized by the Hamas”.

In June 2021, Israeli police banned a popular market in the residential neighborhood of Beit Hanina in occupied East Jerusalem. The market was part of Palestine Economic Week, a local initiative of pop-up Palestinian bazaars to support local products.

Yabus
Rania Elias, director of the Yabous cultural center in occupied East Jerusalem [Zena Al Tahhan/Al Jazeera]

“The institutions of Jerusalem are skeletons”

Amer Khalil, director of the Palestinian Al-Hakawati National Theater in Jerusalem, said he believed festivals like Yabous were essential.

“I think the cultural scene is one of the most important tools that remain at our disposal as Jerusalemites, to preserve the identity of Jerusalemites and Palestinians,” Khalil told Al Jazeera.

“The main objective of the occupation is to empty Jerusalem of Arabs, Palestinians. Culture is a weapon, it is a type of resistance, it increases awareness, it teaches people perseverance, it gives them the breath of patience,” the 58-year-old added.

He said that since its opening in 1984, the Al-Hakawati Theater had received hundreds of notices from the Israeli police ordering it to close for several days.

“They come, they put a notice of the theater being closed for three days for ‘security reasons’, which they suspect is the Palestinian Authority [PA] funding for a specific performance, or that the event includes people who have communications with the PA,” Khalil said.

Other obstacles, Elias said, include the imposition of politically conditional aid from foreign donor states on Palestinian institutions.

“The European Union has started to impose conditional aid to civil society in Palestine. We see this as a humiliation for the role of institutions and their struggle and work with society,” she told Al Jazeera, adding that Yabous refused conditional aid and, with additional pandemic-related issues of COVID-19, had financial difficulties. .

“When you condemn all political parties, and consider them as terrorist groups, what is this help you are giving us? Why? For humiliating our struggle?

“Jerusalem institutions are skeletons,” she continued, noting that her own team in Yabous had been reduced from 11 to four employees.

The geographic separation of Jerusalem from the occupied West Bank has also isolated Palestinians in the city.

“The borders are closed to us – when we try to get groups from the West Bank, we have a problem, when we want to bring in groups from outside, it’s no longer easy to bring in foreigners,” a- she explained.

“The checkpoints prevent us from connecting with the West Bank. Services, audiences, artists have become limited to Jerusalem alone, and this is killing the cultural movement, and killing the movement in Jerusalem as a whole.

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The best events you must attend during Culture Night 2022 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-best-events-you-must-attend-during-culture-night-2022/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/the-best-events-you-must-attend-during-culture-night-2022/ Culture Night 2022 is finally here as the nation prepares to indulge in the best of Irish arts on September 23. With over 1,000 events taking place across the country, this Friday looks to be our biggest celebration of the arts yet. Launched in 2006, Culture Night highlights all our favorite things that make Ireland […]]]>

Culture Night 2022 is finally here as the nation prepares to indulge in the best of Irish arts on September 23.

With over 1,000 events taking place across the country, this Friday looks to be our biggest celebration of the arts yet.

Launched in 2006, Culture Night highlights all our favorite things that make Ireland special. Including music, dance, literature, comedy, sports and more.

Culture Night 2022 is finally here as the nation prepares to indulge in the best of Irish arts on September 23. Photo: Julien Behal Photography

After attracting 1.1 million people last year, the national event, organized by the Arts Council in partnership with local authorities and organisations, will seek to connect more people with their artistic side.

In a year that includes the new Culture Night Late, giving public events that go on late into the night, it can be a bit daunting to decide what to go for. Do not be afraid ! We here at Extra.ie have a guide to all the events you don’t want to miss.

If you can’t leave the house, RTE will broadcast the event described by organizers as “a national moment, celebrating all that is rich and diverse in culture in Ireland today” live from the Midlands.

Performers Lisa O’Sullivan and Mike (Tosh) O’Sullivan, who feature in Dragon’s Tail, by Marie Brett, which is set in the Cork Printmakers Yard on Wandesford Quay for Culture Night. Photo: Clare Keogh

Dublin

The Irish capital offers more than 300 free events for the public. There is plenty to choose from with cathedrals, studios, libraries, parks, museums, galleries and theaters all opening their doors for many exhibitions and tours.

Anyone in Tallaght can catch a live performance of As If By Chance, while Dublin’s Leopold Bloom Press will pay tribute to Ulysees writer James Joyce.

Those near Phoenix Park should learn about the Edwardian period when they visit Farmleigh House or look back on the lives of soldiers on a tour of the National Museum of Ireland. The Trinity Geological Museum’s Story of the Earth exhibit will also be open!

Galway

Galway seems to be one of the best places for this cultural evening. Street performers from Fibin sa Taibhdhearc will parade to the Spanish Arch. On Wednesday evening, at the Town Hall Theatre, those present will soak up music and dance from Palestine and Ireland

The Galway Arts Center will see a live Q&A from the artists of the Array Collective, who will discuss the work of The Druthaib’s Ball. Live music will also be played!

Cartoon fans should head to Galway Distillery for the Galway Cartoon Festival, which includes the launch of the 2022 festival program and an exhibition of ‘Moon Cartoons’.

Cork

Local artists and collectives will take to Cork City Hall, which is a cultural hub for the evening, to perform live music and dancing.

All ghost hunting fans will love the nighttime tour of the paranormal site at the Sirius Arts Center in Cobh. The Circus Factory will open its doors to show how their performances come to life.

Green Party Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media Catherine Martin and Arts Council Director Maureen Kennelly (L) and Sophia Bikova, Circus Factory Cork Pitch’d Festival on stage at the Sugar Club Dublin for the launch of Culture Night. Photo: Maxwell

If that wasn’t enough, popular Cork band Da Buttera will show people how they rehearse when creating their hits. Don’t forget to make your annual visit to the English Market after dark, where you can browse stalls through famous sites.

The Douglas Library honors lyrics by Rory Gallagher, Taste, Microdisney and the Sultans of Ping, while there will be a performance by the Cork Light Orchestra in Cork City Gaol.

Limerick

The Sionna Festival in Limerick will see King John’s Castle invaded by electronic, hip hop and trad music performed by digital and street artists. The history of St. John’s Cathedral will be explored with a free tour focusing on the iconic stained glass windows.

A series of comedy films written by Limerick Youth Theater and director Myles Breen will be screened in what looks to be a highlight of the festival.

Local musicians, singers and storytellers should head to Glenbrohane Community Hall to show off their talents and drink free tea!

For more information on Culture Night and to see what’s happening in your area, visit this link.

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Dinner Japan House’s 10 Ways to Rice: An Exploration of Asian Culture: Food and Drink: Smile Politely https://therightroadtopeace.com/dinner-japan-houses-10-ways-to-rice-an-exploration-of-asian-culture-food-and-drink-smile-politely/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/dinner-japan-houses-10-ways-to-rice-an-exploration-of-asian-culture-food-and-drink-smile-politely/ On rare occasions, Japan House invites chefs from different cultures who work together to create a truly memorable experience. This time I had the privilege of sharing The 10 Ways of Rice: An Exploration of Asian Culture. Photo by Matthew Macomber. Led by Archana Shekara, professor of graphic design at Illinois State University (India) and […]]]>

On rare occasions, Japan House invites chefs from different cultures who work together to create a truly memorable experience. This time I had the privilege of sharing The 10 Ways of Rice: An Exploration of Asian Culture.





Jennifer and Archana welcome everyone to dinner.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Led by Archana Shekara, professor of graphic design at Illinois State University (India) and Jennifer Gunji-Ballsrud, director of Japan House, University of Illinois (Japan), they brought together eight other chefs to represent ten different cultures (represented between brackets) and how they use the rice. The leaders were: Annie Sungkajun (Thailand), Eman Al-Zubeidi (Palestine-Lebanon), Jason Reblando (Philippines), Jimmy Luu (Vietnam), Ladan Bahmani (Iran), Erol Sozen (Turkey), Suejung Han (South Korea ) , and Tak Cheung (China). Several chefs came from across the country to help organize this event.

A table with a penguin chopstick holder, a rice cracker in a small bowl, a wooden utensil, a cloth napkin, and a brochure of food and chefs for the night.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

A lovingly designed booklet described some of the dishes and instructions on how to prepare them. The chef in charge described each item as it was brought to our tables.

Yarong Rachel Guan playing a Yamaha electronic keyboard.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

While we ate, PhD student Yarong Rachel Guan played some amazing piano pieces for the attendees.

A sake cocktail in a tall wine glass.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

To start, we tasted a sake cocktail (Japan) made with rice alcohol. There was a good bite of bubbles in this cocktail, and the evening started well. Rice crackers also waited for us at our tables and provided a small savory snack while Japan House’s chefs and staff finished preparing the food in the kitchen.

Makgeolli alcohol in a small glass.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Continuing the alcohol cure, the makgeolli (South Korea) was served to us next. This rice wine was soft, sweet and vaguely milky in taste. It wasn’t quite like anything I’ve had before.

A halved goi cuon with dip artfully splashed onto one side of the rectangular plate.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Then goi cuon (Vietnam). Tofu and vegetables rolled in rice paper made this appetizer nice and light. A good thing too, because we still had twenty dishes to take away!

Appe and coconut chutney with a single mustard leaf topping in the chutney pool.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

The appe and coconut chutney (India) was a fun dish. Almost bite-sized, the balls (appe) were the perfect size to eat as an appetizer with the chutney. There was a surprising amount of spice in the rice balls, but not unpleasant. It added to the overall experience and made it more memorable.

Warak enab with eggplant and potato slices on a square plate covered with olive oil and dark sauce.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

The warak enab (Palestine-Lebanon) was the tastiest dish so far. Grape leaves wrapped around vegetables with a slice of potato and eggplant on the side, the sauce covering it all gave it a deep, dark and rich flavor. Surprisingly strong compared to previous dishes. We also enjoyed a cold glass of genmaicha (Japan), a roasted rice tea.

Jok with thick slices of fresh ginger layered over the porridge.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Finishing our appetizers was a cup of jok (Thailand). Rice porridge with shitake mushrooms, ginger and coriander, I surprised myself how much I enjoyed the porridge. I embraced the intense palate cleansing taste of fresh ginger and the simple warmth of rice. We were told that it is a popular dish when people are sick in Thailand because it takes little effort to enjoy it, and I believe it.

Bansang where the white rice is in a small bowl and a small three-compartment tray holds the slices of seaweed, kimchi and fried tofu/vegetables.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Starting our main course was simply bansang (South Korea). This simple bowl of white rice was served with crispy seaweed, kimchi, tofu and a fried vegetable. A bit of everything, it’s hard to go wrong with a simple, well-made table like this.

Garlic fried rice in a small bowl with rosemary on top of the rice.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

For garlic lovers, you’ll be happy to hear that we enjoyed the Garlic Fried Rice (Philippines). Topped with rosemary, this hot rice dish certainly had enough garlic to satisfy anyone, like me, who enjoys the taste.

Rice paper salad with the black sesame rice paper sticking out of the salad and the chili oil gathering in the opposite corner of the square plate.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

A rice paper salad (Vietnam) spiced things up (literally) with chili oil alongside strips of mango, vegetables and black sesame rice paper. One of the more unusual main courses, every bite was interesting and different.

Tahchin with barberries on top of the cake and raisins scattered all around the slice of cake.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

At first glance a dessert, the tahchin (Iran) was certainly not after biting into it. Made with white rice, saffron, eggs and yogurt, this dish almost tasted like cake. Scattered raisins and barberries provided not only a little extra sweetness, but also my first consumption of barberries. They tasted like cranberries.

A dible ball in the middle of a square plate with a single leafy filling on top.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Dible (Turkey) was a great way to enjoy green beans and rice. Served hot, it makes sense that it’s a comfort food in Turkey. It’s simple but satisfying all the same.

Cong dan mixian with green onions placed on the noodles and half a hard-boiled egg on the side.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Cong dan Mixian (China) was another satisfying run. Rice noodles, green onions, a hard-boiled egg and vegetables for a pleasant taste. The dots of hoisin sauce and oyster sauce were nice artistic flourishes.

A scoop of biryani with a mint leaf on top and cucumber raita gathered in a pool along one side with another leafy garnish.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Trying my best to keep up with the fast pace of the dishes, we were then served biryani and cucumber raita (India). With just a hint of heat, this dish of rice, vegetable, paneer and curd sauce was quite filling. The mint leaf on top served as a refreshing reminder that we weren’t far from dessert.

Ochazuke where there is a bowl of white rice (before the tea is poured into it) on a large platter with a small container of crispy toppings and another platter with small leafy greens and two pickled vegetables.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

To conclude our main course, we enjoyed the ochazuke (Japan). A collection of odds and ends with a few heavily marinated extras, we’ve been told this dish is a popular way to use up whatever’s left over at home. It’s common to always have rice and green tea on hand in Japan, so putting whatever you want on a bed of hot rice and pouring hot green tea over it makes for a simple and easy meal.

A large tray with mochi, halbai, jian dui and bibingka on a wooden tray in the larger tray and sutlac, shole zard, khao niaow ma muang and roz bi haleeb all in their own bowls in the larger tray.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

For dessert, they were all taken out at once on a single tray to browse according to our desires. I will list them here and mention a few of my personal highlights. The chefs prepared: sutlac (turkey, rice pudding with nuts), shole zard (Iran, rice pudding sweetened with saffron with slivered almonds), khao niaow ma muang (Thai, sticky rice topped with coconut milk and slices of mango), bibingka (Philippines, coconut rice cake), roz bi haleeb (Palestine-Lebanon, sweet rice pudding topped with pistachios and rose petals), jian dui (China, fried glutinous rice balls filled beans topped with sesame seeds), halbai (India, rice sweetened with jaggery and topped with dried coconut and saffron), mochi (Japan, rice cake with red bean paste), and finally a cup of genmaicha hot (japanese, roasted rice tea).

Of all this wonderful assortment of desserts, I enjoyed the roz bi haleeb and the halbai the most. The halbai was surprisingly soft and had a subtle sweetness that I liked. Archana learned this recipe from her family, as it was one of her great-grandmother’s favorites. With the roz bi haleeb, I loved the rose syrup added to the rice. Floral flavors in desserts are rare in our area so I try to savor them whenever possible.

Archana and Jennifer sharing a warm and friendly hug.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

When it was all over the chefs and staff came out so we could thank them for the hard work they put into the evening. Archana, a former graduate student of Jennifer’s, gave her a warm hug to close this wonderful event. Since these dinners are truly unique events, I’m glad I took the time to attend Japan House.

The eight guest chefs and some of Japan House's staff and interns stand by the windows smiling.  Photo by Matthew Macomber.Photo by Matthew Macomber.

Japan House
2000 Lincoln Ave S
Urban

Open during tea ceremonies (reservations required)

Open during other public events (see Japan House program)

Top image by Matthew Macomber.

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KUNA: Opening of the Palestine International Book Fair in Surda – Culture & Art https://therightroadtopeace.com/kuna-opening-of-the-palestine-international-book-fair-in-surda-culture-art/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:41:02 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/kuna-opening-of-the-palestine-international-book-fair-in-surda-culture-art/ 09/14/2022 LOC18:37 15:37 GMT A pavilion at the Palestine International Book Fair RAMALLAH, Sept. 14 (KUNA) — The 12th edition of the Palestine International Book Fair kicked off Wednesday in the town of Sudra, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, with the participation of 350 publishers and 150 authors.Palestinian Deputy […]]]>




LOC18:37
15:37 GMT


A pavilion at the Palestine International Book Fair

RAMALLAH, Sept. 14 (KUNA) — The 12th edition of the Palestine International Book Fair kicked off Wednesday in the town of Sudra, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, with the participation of 350 publishers and 150 authors.
Palestinian Deputy Prime Minister Ziyad Abu Amer said during the inauguration of the 10-day event that this cultural event carries a message of Palestinian resilience as the Palestinian people continue to pursue their national cultural and humanitarian activities.
The Deputy Prime Minister hailed the fair, held at the National Library located in the city of Surda, a significant event as it comes after a hiatus caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
“We are satisfied with the participation of our brothers,” he said, adding that the Arab presence in Palestine instills a sense of confidence and power in the Palestinian people.
For his part, Tunisian Ambassador to Palestine Al-Habib bin Farah, whose country is this year’s guest of honor, affirmed that participation in the 12th edition of the fair testifies to Tunisia’s continued support. to the Palestinian people. (end) nq.tma.aai

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Music, culture and the arts shine in Qatar’s September calendar https://therightroadtopeace.com/music-culture-and-the-arts-shine-in-qatars-september-calendar/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 06:52:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/music-culture-and-the-arts-shine-in-qatars-september-calendar/ The latest version of Qatar Calendar (www.qatarcalendar.com) features many activities across the country. From live theatrical performances to contemporary art exhibitions and sporting events, the September schedule has something for everyone. Philharmonie at the Library: Schubert Octet – September 14, 6pm – Eight members of the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra will perform Schubert’s Octet in F […]]]>
The latest version of Qatar Calendar (www.qatarcalendar.com) features many activities across the country. From live theatrical performances to contemporary art exhibitions and sporting events, the September schedule has something for everyone.

Philharmonie at the Library: Schubert Octet – September 14, 6pm – Eight members of the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra will perform Schubert’s Octet in F major, inaugurating the 2022-23 ‘Philharmonic at the Library’ series. This beloved titan of the chamber music repertoire spans six movements and exudes tender warmth of expression and lyrical beauty from first to last note.

Gopi Sundar Live Ensemble
– September 15, 7 p.m. – Popular composer from southern India; The Gopi Sundar live set will take place at Al Arabi Sports Club and will feature artists such as Amritha Suresh, Mohamed Jasim and Swetha along with their band members.

Pierre and the Wolf – September 16, 6 p.m. – The Hamilton International School will host the musical composition of the great Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev. The story of “Peter and the Wolf” is told by a narrator, the orchestra illustrating the events musically.

Taysir Batniji: No Condition Is Permanent – September 16 to January 21, 2023 – Presented in a global context of social uncertainty and the fragility of historical narratives, the exhibition “No Condition Is Permanent” is designed as a space for reflection dedicated to the artist Taysir Batniji. Hosted at Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art – Doha, the exhibition features productions and reproductions of works by the artist created between 1997 and 2022. During this period, Taysir lived in France, but his life and his work meditate on Palestine. The exhibited works examine Batniji’s diverse practice using photography, drawing, video, installation and performance.

Sophia Al-Maria: Invisible Labors daydream therapy – September 16 to January 21, 2023 – Hosted at Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Sophia Al-Maria: Invisible Labors daydream therapy brings together existing and new works for the first solo exhibition by the Qatari American artist in the Middle East. For the exhibit, al-Maria invites diverse artists, curators, scholars, and communities for a dialogue around stories, science fiction, and the Gulf’s relationship to the surrounding region. The exhibition consists of a variety of media, including installations, videos, and commissioned soundscapes, all of which emphasize the importance of storytelling as a strategy for survival, imagination, and the retrieval of stories.

Majaz: Contemporary Art Qatar – September 16, 2022 to February 25, 2023 – Majaz

Contemporary Art Qatar highlights the success of the Fire Station Artist in Residence program and Qatar’s thriving art scene. Hosted in Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, the exhibition celebrates the program that has supported local and regional artists over the past five years.
Mucize 22 – Harisankar Living in Qatar – September 29, 7pm – ‘Mucize 22, Harisankar Live in Qatar’ will take place in the indoor hall of Al Arabi Sports Club. Audiences can expect a lively performance from the popular South Indian artist.

Abeer Al-Tamimi: Beyond the Rules (ending September 24) – This solo exhibition at the fire station explores the nature of human interactions, behaviors and emotions. The artist, Abeer al-Tamimi, takes a closer look at how culture shapes individual perception in a series of oil on canvas artworks.

Gathering of artists – Until December 31 – Every Saturday until the end of the year at Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, this free event aims to forge closer community ties with artists. The gathering will allow people to meet artists from the community and learn about their works, discuss important global topics, watch artists create live paintings, and learn about the latest happenings in the local art scene.

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Waters versus Pink Floyd: 35 years of conflict | Culture https://therightroadtopeace.com/waters-versus-pink-floyd-35-years-of-conflict-culture/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/waters-versus-pink-floyd-35-years-of-conflict-culture/ The last image of David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Nick Mason and Rick Wright together, after Pink Floyd’s performance at the Live 8 festival in London’s Hyde Park on July 2, 2005. Pink Floyd marked the history of music, but the writing of this one is not quite finished. A new song, a controversy over the […]]]>
The last image of David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Nick Mason and Rick Wright together, after Pink Floyd’s performance at the Live 8 festival in London’s Hyde Park on July 2, 2005.

Pink Floyd marked the history of music, but the writing of this one is not quite finished. A new song, a controversy over the war in Ukraine and a big financial deal in the works are some of the details waiting to be ironed out.

Guitarist and vocalist David Gilmour announced the breakup of the band in 2014 after the release of the album The endless river, which featured unreleased material dating as far back as 1994. Since the death of keyboardist Richard Wright in 2008, Gilmour and drummer Nick Mason have lost all desire to carry on. Gilmour’s announcement was seen as a final farewell to the iconic progressive rock band, whose success peaked in the 1970s. “It’s a shame,” he told the BBC. “But this is the end.”

Thirty-five years earlier, bassist and vocalist Roger Waters, the despotic leader who succeeded founder Syd Barrett in 1968 when Barret left due to mental health issues, had left the band. His departure sparked a legal battle over continued use of the name and material; teammates won. Now Gilmour and Waters are clashing again over politics: one backs the Ukrainian resistance and the other blames NATO, rather than Russia, for the conflict. Meanwhile, a deal is in the works to sell the band’s vast catalog of songs for around 500 million euros.

Despite announcing the band’s final end in 2014, Gilmour and Mason resurrected the band last April to do a track with Ukrainian vocalist Andriy Khlyvnyuk of Boombox. The song is called Hey hey get up and is an explicit and impassioned call to support Ukrainian resistance against Russia. The song was Gilmour’s expression of sympathy for the country of his daughter-in-law, the mother of his granddaughters. The question is why they didn’t just do the song under his own name.

Justifying his decision, Gilmour said Rolling stone: “When I spoke to Nick, and he said he was ready to do it as Pink Floyd, it seemed like a no-brainer. We want to spread this message of peace and we want to lift people’s spirits. defending their homeland in Ukraine, so why not?

Meanwhile, Roger Waters sparked controversy last August during an interview with CNN in which he explained why he had shown the image of Joe Biden during his last tour under the slogan: “War criminal”. He explained that the US president was guilty of inflaming the conflict in Ukraine instead of forcing Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelenskiy to negotiate. “This war is basically about NATO action and reaction pushing right to the Russian border, which they promised [former Soviet leader Gorbachev] they wouldn’t,” he said. Waters previously called Russian President Vladimir Putin’s attack on Ukraine “a criminal mistake in my opinion, the act of a gangster”, but argued for negotiation rather than resistance. Previously, he had supported Russia’s annexation of Crimea and criticized what he saw as Western “propaganda” against Russia. In the interview, which followed US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s controversial visit to Taiwan, he argued the island belonged to China and told the interviewer he should know. more. A week later, at a concert, Waters addressed the audience, telling them that CNN had edited his remarks to make him sound stupid.

Ukrainian organization Myrotvorets has put Waters on its unofficial blacklist. The musician told Russian news agency Tass he was not worried, calling it a futile effort by propagandists. Gilmour was laconic when asked about Waters’ political stance: “Let’s just say I was disappointed and move on. Read in there whatever you want,” he said. The Guardian in April.

Politically, the paths of the members of Pink Floyd diverged considerably. The lyrics of their glory years were decidedly anti-war, though masked with symbolism in order to remain ambiguous. Launching his solo career, Waters sharpened his left-leaning profile: On his previous tour, there were anti-Trump messages and imagery in the form of the former U.S. president as a floating pig wearing a Klu Klux Klan balaclava and endowed with a very small penis, causing boos and walks.

But the band’s legacy is strong enough to survive these controversies. songs like Silver, wish you were Here and comfortably Numb continued to be enjoyed in concerts by its two main band members. Waters staged dramatic performances – in 1990 he gave a live concert of The wall where the Berlin Wall once stood. In 2018, the us+them The tour also shone with a stage brilliance, which was documented in a film by Waters and Sean Evans. Now Waters is touring North America with Roger Waters: This is not an exercise.

Much more restrained in his performances, Gilmour’s voice on stage still managed to transport us to the golden age of Pink Floyd until his retirement in 2016 – the year he performed the Living in Pompeii concert to promote his solo career in the same Roman amphitheater in Pompeii where Pink Floyd recorded the album of the same name in 1972.

Songs requested by the public at concerts are usually those composed by both Waters and Gilmour. The Dark Side of the Moon (1973) and wish you were Here (1975) were team-created albums, and the band’s best songs were a joint effort – in some cases with Wright also in the mix. But Waters’ need to be at the forefront was evident on Animals (1977) and more on the 1979 album, The wall, whose lyrics reflect his own personal trauma very well. He took the reins so firmly that he went so far as to fire Wright and rehire him as an employee – a humiliation for Wright which, however, saved him from The wall disastrous financial fallout from the tour.

At the time of the next album, The final cut was released in 1983, all of the songs were by Waters and featured his vocals to such an extent that there was virtually no room for Gilmour’s vocals or guitar work. In 1986, Waters called for the group to be disbanded, disregarding the fact that the other three could continue without him. Since then, while Pink Floyd has maintained its style and performed well live, it has failed to match its earlier creative prowess, nor have Waters’ solo albums reached the dizzying heights of the band’s heyday in the 1970s.

There was a significant reconciliation in 2005, a truce which brought together the four main band members on stage in London to perform four songs at Bob Geldof’s Live 8 festival, broadcast worldwide. Only Syd Barrett was missing: his sister Rosemary confirmed that he was unable to participate. At the time, Barrett lived an isolated life and wanted nothing to do with his former bandmates; he died the following year.

Waters, Gilmour, Wright and Mason played for 24 minutes at the festival, a performance that could have put an elegant end to the band’s history. But a few collaborations followed between Waters and Gilmour during a concert in Palestine in 2010, and between Waters, Gilmour and Mason during a single performance in London on The wall tour in 2011.

The closest thing to a reconciliation we can expect today is an agreement to sell Pink Floyd songs. As Bloomberg reported in June, the band members are negotiating with Sony, Warner and BMG through representative Patrick McKenna. The Financial Times revealed last week that giant Blackstone is also making an offer. This investment group is not new to the business: its subsidiary Hipgnosis already owns the rights to the work of Neil Young, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Shakira and Justin Timberlake. A transaction of this magnitude, which would include both the compositions and the exploitation of the brand and its merchandising, would be a less emotional end than the Live 8 concert, but much more lucrative for the band members.

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4 pop culture highlights from across the Middle East https://therightroadtopeace.com/4-pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-middle-east/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/4-pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-middle-east/ Recipe for success: Saudi chef Rakan Al-Oraifi shares dessert recipe for Saudi National Day DUBAI: Rising Saudi food star and TV presenter Rakan Al-Oraifi was a semester after completing his master’s degree in marketing when he decided he wanted to pursue his lifelong love for food more seriously. A culinary degree from California later, Al-Oraifi […]]]>

Recipe for success: Saudi chef Rakan Al-Oraifi shares dessert recipe for Saudi National Day

DUBAI: Rising Saudi food star and TV presenter Rakan Al-Oraifi was a semester after completing his master’s degree in marketing when he decided he wanted to pursue his lifelong love for food more seriously. A culinary degree from California later, Al-Oraifi returned to Saudi Arabia to take the local culinary scene by storm.

Among the many accolades he has received, Al-Oraifi was hailed “Best Saudi Chef” at the 2018 Saudi Excellence in Tourism Awards and has worked in several international restaurants over the years. He has also participated in several international cooking competitions, including the second season of “Top Chef Middle East”.

In his work, Al-Oraifi particularly enjoys exploring traditional Saudi cuisine, but infused with modern elements. Her first memory of cooking dates back to making dolma with her mother. “It’s a dish I’ve been making since I was six years old. It was difficult to prepare it as a young child, but I always prepared it with my mother over the years and eventually learned to prepare it myself,” Al-Oraifi said in an interview with Arab News. .

Salad of fried dates. (Provided)

While he was the last executive chef of the Maiz at Diryah Gate, the 33-year-old is now in Paris perfecting the art of pastry.

To celebrate the Saudi National Day, Al-Oraifi will feature in an online cooking series for Fatafeat where he will use his experience of Middle Eastern cuisines to share recipes with Saudi flavors at their heart.

Here, Al-Oraifi talks to Arab News about his favorite cuisines, quick dinner fix and restaurant faux pas.

When you started out as a professional, what was the most common mistake you made when preparing/cooking a dish?
A common mistake is to copy the techniques of other chefs, which can lead to confusion at some point. You can inspire yourself, but it’s important to find your own style and cooking technique.

Corsan in the oven. (Provided)

What’s your best advice for home chefs cooking at home?
It is important for every chef to have a sharp knife. In addition to making the cooking preparation process easier and smoother, it is less likely to hurt you. Dull knives are actually more dangerous.

What ingredient can instantly improve any dish?
Salt is a fundamental ingredient as it enhances and enhances the flavor of any dish.

When you go out to eat, do you ever criticize the food? What is the most common mistake/problem you find in other restaurants?
I generally criticize the temperature of the food as it also indicates the efficiency of the service. For me, the most important thing is to heat up my food and prepare it fresh. I don’t like it when I get cold food.

When you go out to eat, what is your favorite cuisine/dish to order?
Usually I like French and Japanese cuisine, and some restaurants do a fusion of the two, which is even better. French cuisine involves a certain technique while Japanese cuisine requires a particular skill, and I think that fits well.

Meleyaha envelope. (Provided)

What is your favorite dish if you have to cook something quickly at home, say in 20 minutes?
Pasta is a must for me. Even when creating the sauce and batter from scratch, it normally takes no more than 30 minutes. It also offers flexibility and versatility, you can customize it to your liking, with your choice of creams and cheeses, for example.

What customer demand/behaviour annoys you the most?
Because I know the time and effort that goes into each dish, I’m not a fan of customers who dine in a hurry and don’t take the time to enjoy the food. In my opinion, you need at least 60 minutes to appreciate and enjoy your meal, especially if it’s a three-course dining experience.

As a chef, how are you? Are you disciplinary? Do you shout a lot? Or are you more laid back?
I’m cool 80% of the time. Keeping a cool head is important for running a successful kitchen and dealing with customers. You’ll just have better judgment overall.

What is the most difficult dish to succeed (whether on your current menu or not)?
Baking is actually tricky for me. Unlike cooking dishes where one can be spontaneous and rely on one’s own senses and sensations, baking requires specific measurements and strictly followed techniques. For this reason, I am currently in France to study the art of French pastry and improve my skills.

ERYKAH DESSERT RECIPE BY CHEF RAKAN AL-ORAIFI

(Provided)

INGREDIENTS
2 cups wheat flour
2.5 cups of water
5g salt
50g of ghee
50g of honey
30g brown sugar
30g butter
10 g soft dates
20 g of honeycomb

INSTRUCTIONS
1. In a kneader, add the dry ingredients with the wheat flour and salt, then mix gently.
2. Pour water at room temperature. Keep mixing until everything is well combined.
3. In a hot pan or flat grill, melt the ghee, then pour the mixture using a 200ml ladle.
4. Cook for a few minutes until the front side is bubbly.
5. Turn the dough over and cook it for a few minutes; the texture should be very soft.
6. Mix the bread in a dough mixer until you get a hard and smooth texture.
7. Shape them by hand, then stuff them with date paste.
8. Melt the ghee and honey, then pour it over the bread.
9. Garnish with a small piece of honeycomb then serve.

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Google employee who criticized Israel deal quits, alleging retaliation and culture of repression of pro-Palestinian staff https://therightroadtopeace.com/google-employee-who-criticized-israel-deal-quits-alleging-retaliation-and-culture-of-repression-of-pro-palestinian-staff/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 05:37:36 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/google-employee-who-criticized-israel-deal-quits-alleging-retaliation-and-culture-of-repression-of-pro-palestinian-staff/ – Advertising – A Google employee who spoke out against the company’s dealings with the Israeli military said on Tuesday she planned to quit because of what the tech giant had done to her. Former Google employee Ariel Koren left the company after seven years last year. Head of product marketing for Google for Education, […]]]>

– Advertising –

A Google employee who spoke out against the company’s dealings with the Israeli military said on Tuesday she planned to quit because of what the tech giant had done to her.

Former Google employee Ariel Koren left the company after seven years last year. Head of product marketing for Google for Education, Koren helped convince Google to cancel a $1.2 billion contract with Amazon to provide cloud computing to the Israeli government.

Shortly after expressing her concerns, Koren said she was informed that her position was moving to Sao Paulo, Brazil, and that she had 17 days to relocate or be fired.

After all, that was said and done, she didn’t have to uproot herself as her new job would have allowed her to do remote work from her current location.

A Google representative said the company has a zero-tolerance policy on workplace retaliation. The complaint was examined by the National Labor Relations Board and ultimately dismissed.

Our investigation found no retribution here, as we repeatedly stated for several months after our full assessment of this employee’s claim, as we do whenever concerns are raised.

Koren and others formed a splinter organization that was uncensored by the Jewglers. After Israel killed hundreds of Palestinians in Gaza, Koren said Jewglers demanded Google’s support for Israel. She claimed the company’s executives, including CEO Sundar Pichai, eventually did.

The dissidents she got to write to Google CEO Sundar Pichai and the company complaining about pro-Israel bias within the Jewglers group were ignored.

“We believe Jewglers management is using its platform and leadership positions to champion an agenda that many Jews abhor,” they said.

Google employees were invited to electronically tour Hebron, an Israeli settlement in occupied Palestine. A Jewish worker asked if the tour would cover “ongoing Israeli war crimes against the Palestinians.”

His response was tagged for discrimination, harassment and intimidation, which Koren said was a “simple” message of solidarity for Palestinian human rights.

– Advertising –

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St. George’s Middle East Festival returns to fishermen • Current editions https://therightroadtopeace.com/st-georges-middle-east-festival-returns-to-fishermen-current-editions/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 10:00:04 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/st-georges-middle-east-festival-returns-to-fishermen-current-editions/ What started as a small smorgasbord of women’s churches at St. George’s Orthodox Christian Church in Fishers has since grown into a popular festival that attracts thousands of people. The St. George’s Middle Eastern Festival is held annually at 10748 E 116th street, Fishers. This year, it will take place over three days starting September […]]]>

What started as a small smorgasbord of women’s churches at St. George’s Orthodox Christian Church in Fishers has since grown into a popular festival that attracts thousands of people.

The St. George’s Middle Eastern Festival is held annually at 10748 E 116th street, Fishers. This year, it will take place over three days starting September 16 from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., September 17 from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. and September 18 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The festival celebrates the Middle Eastern roots of the Orthodox Christian denomination. The church also invites those unfamiliar with the denomination and culture to take a look inside the gold-domed building on 116th Street.

Founded in 1926, St. George was one of the first Syrian churches in Indianapolis. According to arabindianapolis.com, the church’s goal was to hold “an Easter service in the city’s first and only Syrian church.” At the time, the church needed to raise $15,000 to open its own Orthodox church. Their first church was located at the site of the current Lucas Oil Stadium. And the road to its founding was not an easy one, but the church’s long history is part of what makes celebrating the festival so special, said Edward E. Curtis IV, professor of religious studies at IUPUI.

Although St. George is now a multi-ethnic church, the festival honors Syrians and Lebanese cultural heritage of its Arabic-speaking founders – their food, dance, music, poetry and commitment to establishing an Arab community Orthodox Indianapolis Church, Curtis said. “It is important to remember these pioneers, who showed us how, a hundred years ago, it was possible to be Arab, Christian and American at the same time. They prove that Indiana has always been diverse.

The church moved to Fishers in 2013, where it holds services and hosts the annual festival. Today, the parish is more diverse, but when it was established, it sought to provide a safe space for immigrants from the Middle East in Indianapolis.

Riyadh Bannourah, the president of St. George’s Middle East Festival, has attended the church since 1982, when he first arrived in Indiana from his home in Bethlehem, Palestine. Bannourah has been president of the festival since 2017. He said he has seen the church and the festival grow during his participation.

“Our community is growing. From a hospitality perspective, we welcome them (new people) to our facility, sharing our tradition of food, music and culture,” he said. “And of course we do a church tour and we talk about the ancient church in Antioch, which is our mother church in Syria.”

Reverend Anthony Yagaze, pastor of St. George, is delighted to welcome people to the festival.

“(My) favorite part of the festival is welcoming all the visitors who come here,” Yagaze said. “It’s also a wonderful time for us as members of the parish to just be together and serve others, because that’s really part of the heart of our Christian life, it’s showing the love of God to others through our hospitality.”

Bannourah said the festival is a good way to shed light on Middle Eastern culture.

“It’s about understanding what the Middle East is and where we come from,” he said. “We try to pretend that we are peaceful people, Christians and Muslims. Not all Muslims are bad. We want to make sure everyone understands that. We live in harmony and peace, so that’s what I want everyone to take away from this festival – that we bring people together, share our tradition with them and give them the comfort that we are a very peaceful and loving community.

IF YOU ARE GOING TO

Entrance to the festival is free. A dozen traders will be on site. Activities include live music, dancing, a market, church tours, a silent auction, traditional Middle Eastern dishes and desserts, beer and wine, and a children’s area with bouncy castles.

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6 pop culture highlights from across the region https://therightroadtopeace.com/6-pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-region/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 06:09:33 +0000 https://therightroadtopeace.com/6-pop-culture-highlights-from-across-the-region/ How Saudi fashion brand Atelier Hekayat mixes art, history and theater in its designs DUBAI: Launched in Jeddah in 2012, Atelier Hekayat was founded by fashion designers and sisters Abeer and Alia Oraif. With a mission to bring new meaning to outerwear through bold, contemporary designs that combine traditional Saudi women’s dress with the latest […]]]>

How Saudi fashion brand Atelier Hekayat mixes art, history and theater in its designs

DUBAI: Launched in Jeddah in 2012, Atelier Hekayat was founded by fashion designers and sisters Abeer and Alia Oraif.

With a mission to bring new meaning to outerwear through bold, contemporary designs that combine traditional Saudi women’s dress with the latest international fashion trends, the brand was recently chosen by the Saudi Fashion Commission to be part of of the Saudi 100 brand program. She exhibited her designs in New York (July 26-August 7) ​​in “Saudi 100 Brands,” a global traveling exhibition featuring a curated selection of apparel and accessories from 100 Saudi designers.

“We like to think of our creations as wearable works of art,” Alia Oraif told Arab News. The brand name “Hekayat”, which means “stories” and “tales” in Arabic, was chosen to reflect his vision. “Suspense is found in our designs through hekayat or stories,” Oraif said. “Mystery is our job and serenity is our slogan.”

The clothes reflect exactly that; a luminous explosion of colors, shapes and patterns on materials such as lace, silk, organza and chiffon. Bell sleeves and ruffles added to katfans, kimonos and dresses create elements of surprise and drama.

Oraif says she and her sister grew up in a creative family. Their father is an interior designer. From an early age, the sisters regularly traveled to Milan, Paris and Istanbul to attend fashion week.

“We used to design dresses for our relatives and friends, then we decided to study fashion and turn our passion into a business,” Oraif said.

Oraif holds a bachelor’s degree in nutrition from King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah and a certificate in design and sewing principles from the same university. In the faculty of home economics, she took courses such as clothing and textiles, knitting and crocheting and hand embroidery. In January 2022, she was chosen as a founding member of the Kingdom’s first non-profit professional fashion company, established by the Ministry of Culture and approved by the Minister of Culture, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan.

Abeer Oraif holds a Bachelor’s degree in International Business Management from King Abdulaziz University. She also holds a degree in Fashion Journalism and Fashion Business from Conde Nast College London.

The inspiration of the two sisters comes from art, theater and history. “We like to mix vintage pieces with modern pieces,” said Alia Oraif. “It’s the Hekayat style.”

They also practice sustainable fashion, which means their designs are timeless and can be worn from season to season. They also use and produce their own fabrics, with a preference for French taffeta, moiré and silk. “It all depends on the history of the collection,” Oraif said.

Over the past few years, Atelier Hekayat has collaborated with many luxury brands, including Mouwad Jewelry, Maserati and Chopard.

The brand also participated in the first Fashion Futures Saudi Arabia; an event launched in 2019 as the first dedicated fashion event in the Kingdom. Atelier Hekayat was one of nine Saudi fashion brands selected by Princess Nora bint Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud.

“The fashion industry in Saudi Arabia is brighter than ever,” Oraif said. “We know fashion very well and how it can be linked with craftsmanship and culture, tradition with art and heritage. Saudi Vision 2030 aims to become one of the pioneers in the fashion industry. fashion.We have many projects and surprises coming.Our goal is to go global.

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